Date   

Amel 54 Help for Specs.

John and Anne on Bali Hai <hollamby@...>
 

If I was ordering a 54 I would ask for the following (which it may
already have as I have not seen one and the Amel website does not
contain enough details).
Have the B&G instruments fully interfaced with the Raymarine so that
they can share the Raymarine fluxgate compass and wind instruments
to give you true wind speed and directionand to enable the pilot to
sail at a set angle to the wind.
Have telltales sewn on to the luff of the genoa and the leach of the
main. Sew on matching blue camber stripe in line with the Amel logo
on the main and at the same height on the genoa. Get sacrificial
strips sewn on to the leach and foot of the genoa.
Get the big 160 ltr per hour watermaker so that the watertank can be
filled up with minimum generator hours.
Have the pedestal for the helmsmans and charttable seats supplied by
the New Zealand company making Searider/Surfrider pedestals as it is
the only one made,so far as I know that has gas filled struts to
raise and lowerit and to move the seat in and out.It also swivels so
that it can be used facing against the heeling of the boat and to
face into the cockpit when dining etc. This would mean getting a
Swedish demountable table bracket so that the table can be tucked
away in the big cockpit locker when not in use. These fittings are
not expensive but, in my view are a huge improvement. I can give you
the details of the suppliers if you are interested.
Have teak grab handles fitted on the underside of the fixed part of
the windshield either side of the companionway for the helmsman etc
has something to use when getting up etc especially when it is rough.
If it is not already done have two vinyl windows put in the awning
in the two panels over and in front of the helmsmans seat so that
you can see the set of the two sails when the awning is open.
Test the water maker to ensure that the salinity monitor actually
works.

Good luck, John SM 319


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL 54 Help for specs.

John McDougall <j.c.mcdougall@...>
 

I took delivery of no 21 at end March in Hyeres. I don't know where you
are but if you require a Mediterranean type stern passerelle, don't get the
(current) Amel version. It is very awkward to extend and fold away and
wobbly in use.
John McDougall

-----Original Message-----
From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of bragliae
Sent: 04 April 2006 18:13
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL 54 Help for specs.


I am going to order a new AMEL 54. I wonder if some actual owner could
help me to better specify options with the manufacturer (size of
generator, type of watermaker etc.). Any help is very apreciated.
Thank you.



SPONSORED LINKS Sailing Sailing yacht Amel
Boating sailing


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U-drive oil

Judy Rouse
 

We pulled our Autoprop for service, thus draining the oil for the U-
drive. Looking for verification of weight of oil for replacement.
Notes we have from previous postings on this website state 15W40, but
the sticker in the engine room on the place where the oil should be
added states 20W40.

Can anyone confirm which is correct?

Judy Rouse
S/V Security
SM2 #387


Water Maker Question

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Several times on this site it has been mentioned that the water maker salinity sensor operates
at 500 hertz. On the actual solenoid valve on my boat it is labeled as 24 volt/50 hertz (50
Not 500). Does anyone know the source for the 500 hertz specification?

Thanks, Gary


[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Water maker power draw

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Ian
On my last trip I installed a Blue Sea System Part Number: 8247 Digital Multimeter
with alarm. It has a digital display for Amps, Voltage, Frequency, and Power (watts).
You can see this at their web site. Just google up Blue Sea Systems.

I wired it to the 220 VAC feed to the 220 Volt Breaker Panel so that it
shows all parameters for the power either from the gen set or shore power before
any breakers are set, and also load (either amps or watts) for any given circuit or
combination of circuits. It was a very simple installation. It uses a power
transformer around one of the feed wires to sense amperage and calculate
power. It is great. I only used it for a day or two before coming home and
so on my next trip (3 wks) I will compile a load chart for all 220 VAC circuits.
I'll post that when I finish it.

I did verify that the gen set is putting out exactly its design spec voltage,
frequency, and rated power even at full power load.

I am not sure what you mean by "bung ". The EC sensor has US 1/2 inch pipe
thread. I wrapped it with Teflon plumbers tape and screwed it into the
1/2 inch threaded PVC pipe T.

Sincerely,
Gary

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian Shepherd" <ocean53@...> wrote:

Gary,

I fitted an AC current meter by drilling two holes in the left hand side of
the grey plastic 220V box just to the right of the cupboard above the sink.
The holes matched the two threaded studs the poke out of the back of the
meter. I then bolted the appropriate leads in the AC system supply to the
studs and presto, one very useful bit of kit which is viewable whenever the
cupboard door is open. Total cost about $10. It measures AC load from both
shore power and the genset.

I have a 160 Ltr/hour water maker too, and the total AC current draw is 17
amps at full output.

I note your further investigations to the sality probe function. When I get
Crusader back in the water in abou 4 weeks time, I will do the same test
that you did. What did you use to bung the hole that the probe screws into?

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader

-------Original Message-------

From: amelliahona
Date: 02/19/06 11:03:14
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Water maker power draw

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "edmund_steele" <edmundsteele@>
wrote:
Ed and others:
I had similar trouble with my 160 l/hr watermater on SM # 335. This
behavior
began about 6 months after it was new (about the time we set off across the
Atlantic).
The 20 amp breaker would trip intermittently and periodically just as yours
did.

This problem continued intermittently until recently when it became more
frequent. So I checked the current draw at the 220 volt breaker panel
in the galley by using a clamp type AC ammeter and with the high pressure
pump running under load. The draw was only 13.5 amps. The breaker is a
20 amp breaker. Normally inductive motor start up loads are high and
you would expect the trip to occur with HP pump motor start, but this has
not been my experience. The trip would happen seemingly randomly and
unrelated to load or start. I didn't have a replacement breaker so I
adjusted
the existing breaker. This is done by turning the red painted "set" screw
on
the back of the breaker slightly. I turned mine each 1/8th turn. This
tensions
a spring inside the breaker and raises the tension that must be developed on
the bi-metallic conductive strip in the breaker that causes a trip when load
exceeds the "breaker size" limit. Of course I no longer know what the
actual
trip value of this breaker is. I intend to replace it with a 25 amp breaker
as
soon as possible.

Note that 13.5 amps is probably not the total current draw for the
desalinator.
The circuit box on the back of the watermaker control panel has a 25 amp
breaker labeled "HP" presumably for the HP pump, and also a 6 amp breaker
labeled "BP" which I presume is the "Brine Pump" or low pressure feed pump.
I will take some more measurements next time I am on the boat to verify this

I am trying to get a copy of the schematic and logic diagrams for the water
maker from Dessalator. So far they have only offered to supplly an
installation wiring diagram. I am prepared to reverse engineer this system
to get to the bottom of these questions.

Regards, Gary Silver s/v Liahona

I had a problem with the 160 l / hour watermaker on SM#331 which
tripped the breaker when it was first put into service. There had
been a seal failure problem with the pre-feed pump and I replaced
this with no change in the breaker tripping behavior. Sometimes the
unit would operate for 30 minutes or so before the breaker tripped. I
tried simply replacing the Amel supplied 20 ampere breaker, assuming
that it was faulty but the problem persisted. After several e-mails
to Amel, they agreed that I should replace the breaker with one rated
for 25 amperes. I did this and the unit has operated perfectly for
the past 12 months. I have since discovered that at least one other
Super Maramu owner has had to make the same modification. I have
assumed that the unit must be drawing around 22 amperes in normal
operation – around 4.8 kW but I have not metered this.

Ed Steele
#331 `DoodleBug'







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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Water maker power draw

Ian Shepherd <ocean53@...>
 

Gary,

I fitted an AC current meter by drilling two holes in the left hand side of
the grey plastic 220V box just to the right of the cupboard above the sink.
The holes matched the two threaded studs the poke out of the back of the
meter. I then bolted the appropriate leads in the AC system supply to the
studs and presto, one very useful bit of kit which is viewable whenever the
cupboard door is open. Total cost about $10. It measures AC load from both
shore power and the genset.

I have a 160 Ltr/hour water maker too, and the total AC current draw is 17
amps at full output.

I note your further investigations to the sality probe function. When I get
Crusader back in the water in abou 4 weeks time, I will do the same test
that you did. What did you use to bung the hole that the probe screws into?

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader

-------Original Message-------

From: amelliahona
Date: 02/19/06 11:03:14
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Water maker power draw

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "edmund_steele" <edmundsteele@...>
wrote:
Ed and others:
I had similar trouble with my 160 l/hr watermater on SM # 335. This
behavior
began about 6 months after it was new (about the time we set off across the
Atlantic).
The 20 amp breaker would trip intermittently and periodically just as yours
did.

This problem continued intermittently until recently when it became more
frequent. So I checked the current draw at the 220 volt breaker panel
in the galley by using a clamp type AC ammeter and with the high pressure
pump running under load. The draw was only 13.5 amps. The breaker is a
20 amp breaker. Normally inductive motor start up loads are high and
you would expect the trip to occur with HP pump motor start, but this has
not been my experience. The trip would happen seemingly randomly and
unrelated to load or start. I didn't have a replacement breaker so I
adjusted
the existing breaker. This is done by turning the red painted "set" screw
on
the back of the breaker slightly. I turned mine each 1/8th turn. This
tensions
a spring inside the breaker and raises the tension that must be developed on
the bi-metallic conductive strip in the breaker that causes a trip when load
exceeds the "breaker size" limit. Of course I no longer know what the
actual
trip value of this breaker is. I intend to replace it with a 25 amp breaker
as
soon as possible.

Note that 13.5 amps is probably not the total current draw for the
desalinator.
The circuit box on the back of the watermaker control panel has a 25 amp
breaker labeled "HP" presumably for the HP pump, and also a 6 amp breaker
labeled "BP" which I presume is the "Brine Pump" or low pressure feed pump.
I will take some more measurements next time I am on the boat to verify this

I am trying to get a copy of the schematic and logic diagrams for the water
maker from Dessalator. So far they have only offered to supplly an
installation wiring diagram. I am prepared to reverse engineer this system
to get to the bottom of these questions.

Regards, Gary Silver s/v Liahona

I had a problem with the 160 l / hour watermaker on SM#331 which
tripped the breaker when it was first put into service. There had
been a seal failure problem with the pre-feed pump and I replaced
this with no change in the breaker tripping behavior. Sometimes the
unit would operate for 30 minutes or so before the breaker tripped. I
tried simply replacing the Amel supplied 20 ampere breaker, assuming
that it was faulty but the problem persisted. After several e-mails
to Amel, they agreed that I should replace the breaker with one rated
for 25 amperes. I did this and the unit has operated perfectly for
the past 12 months. I have since discovered that at least one other
Super Maramu owner has had to make the same modification. I have
assumed that the unit must be drawing around 22 amperes in normal
operation – around 4.8 kW but I have not metered this.

Ed Steele
#331 `DoodleBug'







Yahoo! Groups Links








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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yacht Security

Ian Shepherd <ocean53@...>
 

I was boarded during the night whilst stern to the town quay in Marmaris
last July. The washboard was up and the companionway hatch cover pulled
closed (but regrettably not locked) as I was sleeping with the a/c on. It's
not easy to drop the washboards quietly for a newcomer, but never the less I
slept through the whole episode.

I lost video and still cameras and my briefcase containing credit cards,
passport, ships papers and VAT receipts etc. THey tried to steal my laptop
from the nav station, but gave up when they could not easily disconnect a
serial cable which was screwed into the computer casing. Luckily the
briefcase was found abandoned in a back alley a couple of days later. The
only item missing were the keys to my flat, which they may have thought were
the boat keys.

It turned out that an Italian boat was robbed in exactly the same spot
three nights previously. My advice is not to moor on the town quay, in
Marmaris but to anchor around the corner. Even there, I had to scare off two
suspicious characters that were very close to my boat in a wooden dinghy one
night.

I am about to build and install a beam sensor (not a PIR) in the right hand
side of the helmsman's seat just above the floor. The receiver would be
above the fuel tank in the cockpit side wall. When the beam is broken, it
will flash the deck and cockpit lights together with my air horn. It won't
be cat proof should one walk on board, but it will sure scare anyone who
crosses the line whilst at anchor!

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader

-------Original Message-------

From: John and Anne on Bali Hai
Date: 03/29/06 17:34:48
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yacht Security

I have copied an article about security into the files section. It
appeared in the latest issue of the Royal Yachting Association
magazine.
One of the alarming things about it, at least for those of us in the
Mediteranean, is that it indicates that there have been piracy or
perhaps robbery attacks in Greek and Turkish waters.
One of the worst aspects does not get covered, namely robbers coming
on board whilst the crew are asleep.
When we were in the Caribbean we met one couple who were totally
traumatised by two natives getting on board in the middle of the
night with machetes and assaulting them as well as robbing them.They
were on their way back to Europe to sell their boat and in the
meantime they locked themselves in every evening despite the heat. I
read a report that a similar thing happened to a couple anchored in
a bay in St Lucia. A Swan was boarded in Barbuda and the four people
on board were murdered about 15 years ago. When we were in Venezuela
about that time our boat was out of the water in the boat yard and
there was good security by patrols with dogs etc. but we met a
couple who had their boat in a slip and had locked their outboard on
the transom before retiring. Thieves got on board and took the
padlock keys off the chart table and made off with the engine
without waking them We also had our dinghy stolen whilst we were
asleep in a small marina at an offshore island. The thieves had cut
through the painter and made off with the dinghy with a 15 hp
outboard. Luckily we were able to buy a new locally made dinghy and
another engine in Venezuela quite cheaply. The loss of a dinghy is
potentially a major problem as it makes it very difficult to get
ashore when at anchor so we also bought a cheap plastic dinghy as a
precaution.
What should one do.
So far as the yacht is concerned it would be very easy to have a
mesh covered frame to slide in on top of the washboard/hatch and of
course to have some way of securing any hatches with grills so that
there is still ventilation. Joshua Slocombe used to spread thumb
tacks on the deck which made for the noisy departure of boarders.
So far as dinghies are concerned I believe in making up a long
length of strong but flexible stainless wire with eyes swaged on at
both ends. It should be long enough to secure it to a fixing point
at the front of the dinghy and still be long enough to have about 3
or 4 yards of scope for those many occasions when there is only one
place for all the cruisers to go ashore
I did have a nice long plastic covered wire made by Masterlock but
one day the eye splice fell off as the plastic had chafed through
and the non stainless wire had rusted through without any obvious
sign of weakness !

Happy sailing, Anne and John SM 319







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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Fuel dip stick

Ian Shepherd <ocean53@...>
 

Hi Dave,

I have not broken the dip stick, but the piece of cord at the top came off a
couple of years ago and disappeared into the bowels of the fuel tank never
to be seen again despite removing the inspection covers and having a good
look.

So far, no problems.

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader

-------Original Message-------

From: chislyons
Date: 03/28/06 16:43:36
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Fuel dip stick

Has anyone broken the fuel dip stick? We had a mishap and broke the
stick at the 300 liter mark and end piece is in the tank. Does anyone
know if this will cause a problem with the piece blocking or
restricting the fuel to the engine?
Thanks

Dave


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: TDS Tester and in-line meter

Ian Shepherd <ocean53@...>
 

Hi Gary,

Thank you for your detailed response to my query. My apologies for not
spotting your reply before. There are many Amel Owners posts that I have yet
to catch up with. OK I shall reinstall the TDS sensor just downstream of the
membranes and allow time for the meter to stabilize and let you know what
happens.

Thank you also for carrying out the sensor tests that I was planning to do
when I have time. The results are very discouraging. I just wonder why
Dessalator install the probe in the first place when it appears to do
precisely nothing? It just does not make sense. Maybe the full answer is
further down my backlog of posts?

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader

-------Original Message-------

From: amelliahona
Date: 03/25/06 05:29:11
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: TDS Tester and in-line meter

Hi Ian:

I believe your error on your TDS meter upon startup is due to High TDS (i.e.
high EC,
electrical conductivity) due to TDS CREEP. See my post # 2062 dated March
13, 2006 for
a discussion on TDS Creep. It takes my system about 60 seconds running at
pressure
for the EC to recover from the TDS Creep and come down to about 400-450
microSiemens/cm where it stabilizes during the run. Certainly intermittent
testing of TDS
is better than nothing but I really like the security of knowing from minute
to minute that
the EC is within acceptable limits. The Omega EC monitor sounds an alarm at
an EC level
that you can set. I set my at 800 microSiemens/cm.

Besides the EC meter installed about six inches downstream from membranes I
also
installed a valve and short hose just prior to the product water line
entering the copper
pipe that empties into the fresh water tank. I can take water samples here
also to verify
with my hand held TDS meter.

TESTING THE DESSALATOR EC sensor. The Dessalator circuit board has an
oscillator
circuit on it that I would guess from previous posts supplies 400 hertz low
level AC
voltage to the sensor and measures the EC of the product water. I tested my
system as
follows: I took the sensor out of the piping and immersed it in a cup of
fresh water. The
system started up, changed over at the one minute mark to a green light and
good quality
indication and produced water. At that point I poored sea water into the
cup with the
sensor in it. Using my hand held TDS meter I verified that the TDS of the
water in which
the sensor was immersed was greater than 10,000 ppm. The system did not
alarm and
continued to produce water. I waited for 10 minutes with it in this mode to
see if there
was a timer function to prevent transient high TDS from prematurelyl
shutting down the
system but for at least ten minutes the system continued to run without
diverting the
water or indicating poor quality water. I then shut the system down and let
it rest for 30
minutes. Then with the sensor still immersed in the salt water sample I
started the system
up normally. It started exactly as before, at one minute green light, water
production
starts and continues. So in neither situation did the sensor and
associated circuity
recongnize "bad quality" water and function appropriately.

See my previous posts related to lack of documentation on the circuity or a
coherent
explanation of how the system is SUPPOSED to work. Joel shares our
frustration with
Dessalator and is indeed having trouble with the NEW Dessalator system on
his 54. I have
written to Jean Jacques Lemonier regarding this issue and Olivier Beaute has
responded to
me in a timely, professional and detailed fashion. I am awaiting a few
clarifications from
Olivier and then will summarize what I have found. I stand by my suggestion
to all Amel
owners with Dessalator systems that they should install an independant EC
monitor
(preferably a continuous monitor). Amel remains the finest company I have
ever done
business with.

Regards,

Gary Silver Amel SM 2000 Hull # 335 Lying Sea Cow Bay, Tortola, BVI


Hi Roy,

Would you please let me know if you have successfully installed your
inline
TDS meters? I installed one immediately after the outlet from the
membranes
on my 160 l/h unit and it came up with an error message after a second or
so
I suspect that the flow rate might have been too high there as the meter
worked when the output hose was connected taken off the copper pipe that
goes to the tank and the water allowed to pass through the sensor fittings
That's too low down to mount the meter in the galley, so if you find a
location higher up that works, then please let me know.

There have been several promises from Rod Boreham and Joel for a
clarification statement on exactly what protection there is against bad
water polluting our one and only water tank, but to date I have seen
nothing
published. The fact that no reassurance has been forthcoming gives me an
uneasy feeling. It's time the record was put straight. If the protection
is
not there, then there is a potentially dangerous situation for those of us
who rely upon the integrity of our water tank for long distance passages.
The facts must be known to Desallator, so why have they not come forwards
to
defend their design? It's time we knew whether the salinity probe does
what
we all hope it will do, or not.

Several have suggested that shorting the probe contacts will test it's
function. I am told that this is not so as the probes are subjected to a
500
Hz alternating voltage and so shorting them does not simulate a high
salinity content.

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 'Crusader'





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Re: Anti Fouling

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Ian:
I do not know the exact Amel paint but Amel rold me that it is a hard, non-ablative paint.
I have used Trinidad SR for the last 5 years with good results. All hard paints require
periodic scrubbing of the hull to expose new anti fouling as sailing alone will not
create enough paint removal to expose new anti fouling. I have repainted with two coats
every two years. I just scuff sand the old paint to create tooth adhesion for the new coats
and have had good results. I only get 2 years out of two coats of paint in the tropics. I
used the Trinidad recommended metal primer for the metal cast iron where I had lost
some paint. Grind to fresh metal, wipe down with acetone or MEK, paint immediately,
wait NO MORE THAN 10 minutes between coats or you have to scuff sand between coats.
It sticks to everything but it won't stick to itself if allowed
to dry because it is such a hard paint. Immediately coat with the Trinidad SR or you
have to scuff sand before applying.

My understanding is that you can put an ablative paint over a hard paint but not the
opposite.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Gary

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian Shepherd" <ocean53@...> wrote:

Can anyone give me a quick answer as to what brand of anti fouling Amel
use? I just missed them on the phone today and need a rapid answer. Time
difference will make a call too late tomorrow.

I shall be trying the antibiotic enhancement to the paint which I am told
greatly extends the paints life. Maybe a harder grade of paint would be a
good idea too if it is going to last maybe 5 years, though I want to stick
to the same brand to minimize the need for a complete rub down and primer.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader


Re: Anti Fouling

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Ian:
I do not know the exact Amel paint but Amel rold me that it is a hard, non-ablative paint.
I have used Trinidad SR for the last 5 years with good results. All hard paints require
periodic scrubbing of the hull to expose new anti fouling as sailing alone will not
create enough paint removal to expose new anti fouling. I have repainted with two coats
every two years. I just scuff sand the old paint to create tooth adhesion for the new coats
and have had good results. I only get 2 years out of two coats of paint in the tropics. I
used the Trinidad recommended metal primer for the metal cast iron where I had lost
some paint. Grind to fresh metal, wipe down with acetone or MEK, paint immediately,
wait NO MORE THAN 10 minutes between coats or you have to scuff sand between coats.
It sticks to everything but it won't stick to itself if allowed
to dry because it is such a hard paint. Immediately coat with the Trinidad SR or you
have to scuff sand before applying.

My understanding is that you can put an ablative paint over a hard paint but not the
opposite.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Gary

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian Shepherd" <ocean53@...> wrote:

Can anyone give me a quick answer as to what brand of anti fouling Amel
use? I just missed them on the phone today and need a rapid answer. Time
difference will make a call too late tomorrow.

I shall be trying the antibiotic enhancement to the paint which I am told
greatly extends the paints life. Maybe a harder grade of paint would be a
good idea too if it is going to last maybe 5 years, though I want to stick
to the same brand to minimize the need for a complete rub down and primer.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader


Anti Fouling

Ian Shepherd <ocean53@...>
 

Can anyone give me a quick answer as to what brand of anti fouling Amel
use? I just missed them on the phone today and need a rapid answer. Time
difference will make a call too late tomorrow.

I shall be trying the antibiotic enhancement to the paint which I am told
greatly extends the paints life. Maybe a harder grade of paint would be a
good idea too if it is going to last maybe 5 years, though I want to stick
to the same brand to minimize the need for a complete rub down and primer.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] THROUGH HULL VALVES MARAMU 186

DENNIS STULLER <svcheechako@...>
 

HI JOEL,

BOTH OF THE HOLDING TANKS WERE LEAKING. I AM WORKING
ON CUSTOM POLYPROPYLENE TANKS WHICH I HOPE WILL LAST
FOREVER. THANKS FOR THE TIP ON LEWIS MARINE, I WILL
CHECK WITH THEM.

REGARDS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU HULL 186



--- "Joel F. Potter" <jfpottercys@att.net> wrote:

Hi Mr. Stuller,

Having done refits on more than a dozen AMEL boats
over the
years, the one piece of advice I can give you is
that if
your holding tanks are stainless steel, THROW THEM
AWAY.
They rarely last 15 years and when they fail...you
don't
want to experience this. The welds corrode from the
inside
out and rarely give an indication of immanent
failure.

I am all but certain that I obtained the correct
thread ball
values in years past from Lewis Marine in Ft.
Lauderdale.
It's a "trade only" dealer but they do have a web
site at
www.lewismarine.com <http://www.lewismarine.com/> .
Good
luck

Joel F. Potter
AMEL 54 # 14, HOLLIS

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist
Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas
Phone: 1 (954) 462-5869 Fax: 1 (954) 462-3923



[Non-text portions of this message have been
removed]


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Re: Water maker

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi John:
Don't be afraid to use your machine!! It will last longer and the membranes
definitely benefit from frequent use. Just be cautious and that the weaknesses
have been illuminated we can take precautions that should prevent further
problems.

The control panel can NOT be removed from the galley side without first
detatching multiple items from the back side (the back side is accessed
from the port lazarette in the cockpit). There is a plywood panel on the
forward end of the lazarette that is held in place with two wood screws.
It is removed easily and gives great access to the back side of the
control panel. I will post a picture of this area soon. Clean out the
lazarette a bit and you can lay down comfortably to work.

The electronical box lid is removed by a quarter turn latch in each
corner, and the electrical circuit board with the fuses is in the lid of
the box as it is removed. There is 220 VAC and 24 VDC power in this
box so make sure all breakers are off before working here. I am
not sure where the 24 VDC power comes from. I haven't measured
it with a multimeter but I suspect it is live bus 24 VDC so be careful
not to short anything when checking the fuses. My fuses were all
ok (there are 4).

The documentation from Dessalator is indeed the worst of anything
on our boats. That is why I have been trying to provide it here. I
plan on posting a pdf schematic of the electronics when I get them
fully traced.

From what I can gather if you flush the system with fresh water every
one to two weeks there is no need for the pickling agent. I am in
the process of installing a timer to flush my system automatically every
few days when I am away from the boat. i will post more on that
as I get that project complete.

Bottom line, USE THE SYSTEM.

Best regards, Gary
I

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "John and Anne on Bali Hai" <hollamby@...>
wrote:

Hi Gary,
Thanks for the pics of the guts of the watermaker which seem to be
incredibly complex and it also seems from the website unreliable.
I have not dared to use mine since the recent spate of reports and
have grave doubts about the reliability of the installation. I have
ordered an RDS meter which has yet to arrive but in the meantime I
wonder if one of the fuses have gone. It seems from yor pics that
they are not in the box behind the panel in the galley which does
not want to come out easily. Is this fuse box panel hidden behind
the ply cover to the galley panel in the big cockpit locker? My boat
came with detailed instructions for everything except the intestines
of the watermaker and so I remain in total ignorance of its intimate
parts and maintenance. I do how ever remember Olivier telling me
that we did not have to bother with treating the machine with any
chemicals and should only flush it with product water after use if
it was not going to be used for more than a couple of weeks. We have
followed this advice for four years without any problems but recent
stuff on this site has got me frightened. Anyhow thanks for your
efforts on our behalf.
Best wishes, John SM 319


Safety and Security

john martin <symoondog@...>
 

In regard to recent emails about yacht security, it is inconceivable to me that a person who would not dare go to sleep in his own house in the US or UK with the front door open would venture to a third world country and go to bed with hatches and doors wide open. I personally could never sleep. For thirty years on board our previous boat a 38 Soverel sloop, my wife and I have sailed safely to distant places around the world and stayed in hundreds of remote anchorages. Our success is simply security: we installed bars on all the hatches and had a drop in flat bar screen in the main hatch. These allow hatches to be left open for ventilation but prevent intruders from getting in. (The one and only time we were boarded in the middle of the night was one evening in Turkey when we forgot to put the drop screen in.) On our Super Maramu I installed similar systems of two stainless steel bars (powdercoat painted white) into all our deck hatches. These can also be easily made of aluminum bar and painted. (In the bow and stern cabins, you do need to have a screwdriver stored near by to remove them in case of fire in the main cabin) For the main companionway I built a 2 piece slide-in screen of flat aluminum bars about 3/8 thick. The two pieces slide in the hatch door groove and a barrel bolt secures the horizontal hatch top closed, keeping the screen pieces from coming out and preventing burglars from getting in. You have to build it in 2 pieces to be able to slide them up and out (if in one piece it is too tall and will hit the hard dodger before coming completely out). You could also attach insect screen to these pieces if you wish. Another benefit besides sleeping securely at night with hatches open is the ability to leave the boat during the day without locking the entire boat up. Photos of these are on the Moon Dog album on the Amel group Yahoo site.

On the issue of stolen dinghies and outboards, it never ceases to amaze me that a cruiser who is going on his life long dream of sailing the world seeing places and smelling the flowers would want a 15 to 30 horsepower motor so they can speed through the anchorages and villages. That said, I was in the Caribbean a couple years ago and was appalled at seeing 32 dinghies at one dinghy dock in Martinique. All but one had outboards on them that looked like they just came out of the box. First of all, these outboards represent a years salary for most third world people. Second, they are big and can be well used by the fishermen. The dinghies that are stolen are primarily stolen for the outboards. No native Ive ever seen has a rubber dinghy for fishing. And Ive never been greeted in the islands by a native in a rubber dinghy. If only your dinghy is stolen, then no doubt it was stolen by a fellow yachtie. I use a 3 hp and a 7 hp outboard. No self respecting fisherman would be caught dead with a 3 hp. The first thing I do with a new outboard is take a heat gun or hair dryer and remove the brand name decal from it. Then I sand the engine cowl down and repaint it, putting my yacht name and some artwork on it. Once I painted an engine cowl with 7 different colors or paint, it was truly ugly. No one was going to steal that engine. I do the same with my dinghy, personalized with boat name and some artwork.

As for firearms, I carry a single barrel sawed off shotgun painted international orange. It will shoot flares and I dont hide it. In port, I keep a 12 gauge shotgun shell in it with the shot cut out of shell. When you need to scare someone on deck just aim it at him and fire. Lots of noise, smoke and flames but nobody gets killed over stealing something.

I also keep a 12 guage Mossberg stainless steel pump shotgun for the open ocean (I do keep it hidden). If Im attacked at sea I will bide my time with the gun hidden from sight until Im boarded. With hands on the railing trying to come aboard, and your boat in a rolling sea, the intruder will easily be eliminated and his fellow pirates sitting ducks. Surprise is the answer to pirates, cunning is the answer to thieves.

Regards,

John Martin
SM #248 Moon Dog

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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] THROUGH HULL VALVES MARAMU 186

amelforme
 

Hi Mr. Stuller,

Having done refits on more than a dozen AMEL boats over the
years, the one piece of advice I can give you is that if
your holding tanks are stainless steel, THROW THEM AWAY.
They rarely last 15 years and when they fail...you don't
want to experience this. The welds corrode from the inside
out and rarely give an indication of immanent failure.

I am all but certain that I obtained the correct thread ball
values in years past from Lewis Marine in Ft. Lauderdale.
It's a "trade only" dealer but they do have a web site at
www.lewismarine.com <http://www.lewismarine.com/> . Good
luck

Joel F. Potter
AMEL 54 # 14, HOLLIS

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist
Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas
Phone: 1 (954) 462-5869 Fax: 1 (954) 462-3923


Water maker

John and Anne on Bali Hai <hollamby@...>
 

Hi Gary,
Thanks for the pics of the guts of the watermaker which seem to be
incredibly complex and it also seems from the website unreliable.
I have not dared to use mine since the recent spate of reports and
have grave doubts about the reliability of the installation. I have
ordered an RDS meter which has yet to arrive but in the meantime I
wonder if one of the fuses have gone. It seems from yor pics that
they are not in the box behind the panel in the galley which does
not want to come out easily. Is this fuse box panel hidden behind
the ply cover to the galley panel in the big cockpit locker? My boat
came with detailed instructions for everything except the intestines
of the watermaker and so I remain in total ignorance of its intimate
parts and maintenance. I do how ever remember Olivier telling me
that we did not have to bother with treating the machine with any
chemicals and should only flush it with product water after use if
it was not going to be used for more than a couple of weeks. We have
followed this advice for four years without any problems but recent
stuff on this site has got me frightened. Anyhow thanks for your
efforts on our behalf.
Best wishes, John SM 319


THROUGH HULL VALVES MARAMU 186

DENNIS STULLER <svcheechako@...>
 

DEAR GROUP,

WE ARE ENGAGED IN A MAJOR REFIT ON "DIFFERENT DRUMMER"
1985 MARAMU HULL#186 AND ARE HAVING DIFFICULTY FINDING
NEW THROUGH HULL VALVES FOR THE HEAD THROUGH HULL
FITTINGS. ON THIS BOAT THE VALVES SCREW ON TO BRONZE
FITTINGS WHICH ARE GLASSED INTO THE HULL AND WHICH ARE
FLUSH AND AT A SEVERE ANGLE TO THE HULL.
THE VALVES ON THIS BOAT ARE STAMPED 1 1/4 AND 1 1/2
AND APPEAR TO BE OF STANDARD IPS SIZE EXCEPT THAT THEY
ARE SLIGHTLY LARGER IN SIZE AND THE THREAD PITCH IS
SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT.
PER VETUS THESE ARE A BRITISH STANDARD PIPE SIZE BASED
ON A CASTING MARK WHICH LOOKS LIKE A STYLISED LETTER Y
WITH A SMALL O IN THE CROOK OF THE Y. VETUS FIRST
PROMISED US DELIVERY IN THREE DAYS BUT NOW AFTER 2
MONTHS THEY ARE VAUGUE ABOUT DELIVERY AND ARE TALKING
ABOUT ADDITIONAL MONTHS OF WAITING.

DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY INFORMATION OR SUGGESTIONS? I AM
ON THE VERGE OF CUTTING THE FITTINGS OUT AND
INSTALLING CONVENTIONAL THROUGH HULL FITTINGS BUT THIS
WILL NECESSITATE MODIFICATION OF THE HOLDING TANKS AS
WELL.

REGARDS, DENNIS STULLER "DIFFERENT DRUMMER"

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New Water Maker Photo

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

I just posted in the Dessalator Water Maker Service File a picture of the plumbing and
electrical connections on the back side of the water maker on my Hull # 335 RO system. I
have the reverse engineering partially completed on the circuit board and will post more on
that soon.

Gary Silver


HOT WATER HEATER - ZINCS

pjppappas <pjppappas@...>
 

RE THE NAUTIC 45
For those of you who have not had the pleasure of changeing the
zincs I thought I would post this message. I have just completed
the awful task on my supermarmu #369 "CALLISTO".
You will need:
1. Small phillips srewdriver
2. Staigth edge screwdriver
3. Pen or tape to mark hoses and electrical wires. (mark everything)
4. Small bucket
5. 13 mm box end wrench
6. 13 mm rachet drive
7. Rags
8. Time (4 hrs)
9. Patients

1. Disconnect from shore power, throw hot water breaker off (220v
circuit), turn off water pump (24v circuit)
2. Drain water using the release valve on the hot water outlet (the
bottom hose). It may not drain all of the water.
3. Disconnect cold water inlet and hot water outlet. Stand back
there will be more water.
4. Disconnect from the hot water heater the two hoses coming from
the engine. You will need to catch the fluid in a small bucket or
you will have a mess that you can not get to.
5. Disconnect the two bands securing the heater in place (disconnect
the stern side). You can now raise the empty heater (about 40 pounds)
to a horizontal level. It will wedge in place.
6. Remove the plastic shield form the bottom of the heater.
7. Disconnect all electrical connections.
8. Remove the eight bolts that hold the bottom of the heater in
place.
9. Remove the bottom. It will be a little sticky - pry loose with
screw driver.
10. Inspect the zincs, find that they are still in good shape and
that you have wasted your time. Mine are a year old and still 3/4
left.
11. Put the whole business back together.
12. Clean up the mess.
13. Remember. "there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much
worth doing as simply messing about in boats" GRAHAME

Peter Pappas