Date   

Re: new to Amel Owner Group

Volker Hasenauer
 

Hi Kent, hi Iris,

many thanks for the welcome note!

Volker
SY Aquamarine
Santorin 027
Malaysia

On Sun, Nov 17, 2019 at 9:35 PM karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Welcome to the Amel Family, Volker and Michaela.  You have made a choice that you won’t regret, and you will find all the help you will need getting to know Aquamarine right here.  Please never hesitate to ask a question, we’ve all been new to our boats and are happy to help you get acquainted.
Always sign your posts with name, boat name, hull number (SN27), and where you are.  That will help us when making recommendations about repairs, parts, and nearby professional help.

Be safe and have fun!  We hope to meet you somewhere for a beer/wine/rum and shared cruising stories.

Kent & Iris
S/V Kristy
SM243
St Michaels, MD, USA, heading South soon.

On Nov 16, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...> wrote:


Hi Everybody,

we just registered a few days ago with the Amel Owners Group and thought its no a bad idea to introduce our self.  

Michaela & myself (Volker) just bought a Amel Santorin from 1990 (SN 027). The boat is currently in Borneo/Malaysia, however we will bring her back to Langkawi/Malaysia soon.

We are long term expats in Malaysia. Our previous boat, a Hans Christian 43, was sold a couple of years ago because work commitment was too high, however now time is "ours" and we plan to explore the Andaman Sea and in future most likely a "bit" further as well with our Amel.

We took the chance to rename the boat, she is now called "Aquamarine"

I started to read with much interest the mails from the group and enjoy the information shared.

Since our Amel is not quite new, I am sure we will have as well "this & that" to share or to ask the group about some advice.

Greetings from Malaysia

Volker & Michaela


Re: Maramu bonding question

James Alton
 

Miles,

Viewed from the engine room, on my Maramu there is a copper strip that starts at the forward engine room bulkhead that runs aft down the inside of the Port engine stringer and then athwartships across to the stb. engine stringer running on the partial bulkhead forming the aft end of the grey water sump/bilge. My bonding strap was originally connected to the strip running athwartships on the sub. side. I moved the bonding strap connection to the inside of the Port engine stringer so as to orient the heavier copper plate so that it ran along the side of the hull which prevents blocking the drainage coming into the bilge from aft but functionally this works the same at the original setup. I have not extensively inventoried all items attached to the bonding system but the engine block, thruhulls, rudder, stuffing box, pretty much all of the underwater metals. The idea of bonding is to connect all of these metal bits to a sacrificial zinc that is less noble than the rest of the connected metals to protect the connected metals. One thing to keep in mind is that in a bonded boat, it is especially important to insure that your sacrificial anodes are always in good shape since each connected component will have a different position on the galvanic scale the the least noble pc. is going to corrode faster than if it was not connected to any other metals.

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Nov 17, 2019, at 5:37 PM, smiles bernard via Groups.Io <smilesbernard=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello Amelians

I’m going to attempt to redo my bilge bonding strap connection as part of this winters growing list
Thanks to this forum for excellent tips and tricks on this project so far.

In terms of the wider problem though. . .

On my boat I can’t really tell where/how the bonding cable used to run aft from the engine room to a rudder / anode connectio

so a few questions that would be amazing for this groups insight on:


What items are bonded ?
I assume: keel bolt and rudder are originally bonded. Would be grateful to hear if other items were also originally bonded. Through hulls for example ?

Also I’m a bit confused about the original cable run. Bonding vs. The Grounding plate for ssb

Be great to know how your bonding cables run from the engine room / keel bolt, aft to the rudder aft.


On the transom there is a copper strip /plate that runs down from the aft interior transom locker. I presume this is to do with the ssb ground not bonding ?

Many thanks in advance

Miles
Maramu 162



Maramu bonding question

smiles bernard
 

Hello Amelians

I’m going to attempt to redo my bilge bonding strap connection as part of this winters growing list
Thanks to this forum for excellent tips and tricks on this project so far.

In terms of the wider problem though. . .

On my boat I can’t really tell where/how the bonding cable used to run aft from the engine room to a rudder / anode connectio

so a few questions that would be amazing for this groups insight on:


What items are bonded ?
I assume: keel bolt and rudder are originally bonded. Would be grateful to hear if other items were also originally bonded. Through hulls for example ?

Also I’m a bit confused about the original cable run. Bonding vs. The Grounding plate for ssb

Be great to know how your bonding cables run from the engine room / keel bolt, aft to the rudder aft.


On the transom there is a copper strip /plate that runs down from the aft interior transom locker. I presume this is to do with the ssb ground not bonding ?

Many thanks in advance

Miles
Maramu 162


Re: Victron Quattro charger/inverter installation

Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
 

Hello James,

On our YouTube channel we posted a Video how we installed our Victron Charger Inverter 5000W 

Go to:

S V Vela Nautica

On YouTube there is also more information how we switched to lithium batteries. We use it now for over a year. 

Oliver from 
Vela Nautica 
54#39
Lanzarote

On Fri, Nov 8, 2019, 02:36 James Cromie via Groups.Io <jamescromie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks Porter.  What do you mean by “one side” for each one?  
-James
On Nov 7, 2019, at 6:22 PM, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

James. I’ve done this.its a bit of a pain but I rewired  the panel.  One side for inverter power, the other side for shore/generator power. Keeps it logical and simple with out the possibility of recurrent loops. 

Porter. 

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Nov 8, 2019, at 4:36 AM, James Cromie via Groups.Io <jamescromie@...> wrote:

Hello Super Maramu or A-54 owners - 
(and particularly Scott Tengah) 

I am going to install a Victron 24V 5000W Quattro Charger/Inverter in my Super Maramu.  
As this has an internal automatic transfer switch, I am trying to figure out how to wire this unit to bypass the original Amel transfer switch.  

In any case, I would greatly appreciate any advice / input on how others have installed this unit in their Amel.  Any photos or schematics would be extremely helpful.  

Many Thanks,
James
SV Soteria
SM2K 347
Cartagena, Club Nautico (in the sweltering heat and humidity)


Re: Raymarine autopilot

hanspeter baettig
 

Hi JP
we have similar boats number, therefore can yo maybe send me pics about the installation of the AP under the aft cabin bed. Thank you. my email: hanspeterdot beattig at bluemail dot ch

regards Hanspeter
Tamango 2
SM16
Antigua

Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 16.11.2019 um 15:45 schrieb Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...>:

Hi,

I installed an ACP 400 with hydraulic ram directly on the bell crank of the rudder.

Far smoother than the electric one which is still on tthe he helm.

In the event of a major steering failure, I can steer the boat through. The AP controls after disconnecting the offending rack and pinion... without resorting to hand steering for days on end.  

System is like Paul on Kerpa.

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM007, NZ




On 17 Nov 2019, at 08:00, Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote:


We installed the kit you referring to about 18 month ago, I still have my old Autohelm installed, Installed a switch for swapping between them. I am not totally sold on the new Raymarine had expect it to perform better. Very good up wind, but as soon as you get the wind aft of the beam it start to swing from side to side, after some tweaking and upgrade of software it is now better but fare from excellent.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


Re: Folding Prop

Arnold Mente
 

Hi,
sorry to attend with a question! I am Arnold with the SM 203. I bought the boat this year and I also have a shaft alternator in connection to my Autoprop. First I did´n check if it
is working ready. I also out of understanding how it should work with a Autoprop. On my panel is a warning not to use when engine running! Have only test if the shaft with Autoprop turns with engine off under sails and he do!
How is the correct operation of the shaft alternator?
Engine OFF
Gear reverse
Switch shaft alternator ON????

Can anybody give me the procedure?????

Thank you

Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203



Am 17.11.2019 um 09:49 schrieb Ian Park via Groups.Io <sunbeat2=icloud.com@groups.io>:

Volker,
Doesn’t your Santorin have a propellor shaft alternator?
I don’t think you can use this with a folding prop.
I would not be without the electricity this gives me. My batteries are almost always 100% charged when sailing with all instruments and autopilot working.
Ian

Ocean Hobo SN96







--
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: Folding Prop

Ian Park <sunbeat2@...>
 

Volker,
Doesn’t your Santorin have a propellor shaft alternator?
I don’t think you can use this with a folding prop.
I would not be without the electricity this gives me. My batteries are almost always 100% charged when sailing with all instruments and autopilot working.
Ian

Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: Important Update Re: No steering parts, rack & pinion, cables, from Amel

karkauai
 

Nicely said, Antonio.  Thank you.

Et merci beaucoups Maud et al à SAV@Amel. fr

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
karkauai@...
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Nov 16, 2019, at 9:52 AM, Antonio, Vagabundo SN108 <vagabundo@...> wrote:


Hi guys , Hi owners, Hi Thierry and Maud,

I particularly want to write these lines to give the right meaning back to the discussion.  
I will apologize if I am not short, but I humbly believe that I can interpret the thoughts of many owners and friends. 
The ferment that has developed around the theme of ultraflex cables in my opinion is extremely positive and necessary. 
When I bought Vagabundo I was not aware of the existence of this forum, but thanks amel yacht owners forum and thanks Olivier, over the years I managed my boat to back to the right level of maintenance, so that it could finally be a blue Water Cruise again. 
Many owners entrust their dreams and lives to the boats built and designed by Henri AMEL and thanks to the construction quality of the AMEL shipyard, we all sail safely with our boats.
But there is a particularly important aspect that must never be underestimated and it is the age and the obsolescence of a lot of equipments installed on our boats.
There is no anxiety, no fear in this.  
If there were anxiety and fear, none of us would take the sea and only a crowds would leave the land entrusting their lives to a boat that he considers unsafe.
But if there is one thing I learned during my life spent at sea is that the attention to small details often makes the difference between a happy ending and a misfortune.  
Precisely this attention (that is often found in the posts and discussions of this forum that I call the big family AMEL) has given the AMEL boats in the world and on the used market a great reputation.
I am therefore sure that the food for thought that will arise in this group will be an inexhaustible source of information and advice for amel itself so that over the years more safe and reliable boats can be produced like  in the past. 
At the same time it is inevitable to recognize the fact that many boats that sail have reached an age by now and that a lot of equipment needs a thorough maintenance if not a complete replacement. 
It is clear that the goodness of the materials used has permitted that many years have passed since they were assembled on our boats.  During these years many equipment manufacturers have failed, they have closed, they have changed their business, they have passed on to a better life.  
In the future, it will certainly be necessary to find adjustments and solutions to more or less serious problems that will arise.  I personally believe that it is extremely erroneous and dangerous to underestimate the needs of each owner and of each boat that are expressed in this forum.
Therefore, concluding my speech, I am sure that this time too AMEL will demonstrate sensitivity and attention to a problem that has been necessary to resolve.  At the same time I am sure that it is ultra Flex, a company that I know, it will be able to provide all of us and all the owners who want to take action with a safe solution to the problem that we discussed in this forum.
Br and Fair wind
Antonio Martina e Azzurra 
On board in Tuscany 
Vagabundo Santorin number 108


Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 15 nov 2019, alle ore 18:35, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> ha scritto:


To review what I previously wrote: I received an email from Uflex USA, the Ultraflex distributor in the US. Email message to me from Uflex USAUltraflex, Italy is in contact with Chantier Amel in France, apparently they will be able to supply them a last batch of cables. When one SM owner noticed that the email from Uflex stated only "cables" and not racks, 3 days ago I wrote: "I believe that the US distributor probably misstated what Ultraflex is doing, but since I am not speaking directly to Ultraflex, Italy, I cannot know for sure. Since apparently Thierry BILLARD, manager of SAV at Amel, is in discussions with Ultraflex, I feel it is improper for me to get directly involved. The answer to your question will come from an owner ordering the racks from Amel. I am sure we will know more soon."

Yesterday Thierry Billard SAV Manager emailed me and said: "We suddenly face with numerous emails and phone calls asking for info or order on pinion and rack of the steering system. We suspect you to have posted an anxiolitic message on the social network about a risk of shortage.  Does it  right ? For your review we are about to receive mid of Décember the first units  of the internal toothed bar that must solve almost all this wear issues .The only obligation will be to dismount the pinion rack case to replace this worn toothed bar. Although your help is greatly appreciatly among the Amel community we request you from now to submit us for pre approval any new further message of this sort or to consult us if more info is needed."

Of course it is not my intention to cause "panic" as Maud wrote. My only intention is to help any of you find the information that you need. But, in my attempt to help several of you, I have irritated two good people at Amel. Possibly they think that I am causing "panic" because they are on the receiving side of the solution to this steering parts issue. I will assure you that all I did is what I challenge myself every day to do...that is is help each of you enjoy your Amel while you own her. I have the utmost respect for Thierry and Maud who always do an amazing job helping owners of Amels.

I CC'd Thierry Billard of this email. He will be able to read this so that there is no misunderstanding. 
--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   



Re: new to Amel Owner Group

karkauai
 

Welcome to the Amel Family, Volker and Michaela.  You have made a choice that you won’t regret, and you will find all the help you will need getting to know Aquamarine right here.  Please never hesitate to ask a question, we’ve all been new to our boats and are happy to help you get acquainted.
Always sign your posts with name, boat name, hull number (SN27), and where you are.  That will help us when making recommendations about repairs, parts, and nearby professional help.

Be safe and have fun!  We hope to meet you somewhere for a beer/wine/rum and shared cruising stories.

Kent & Iris
S/V Kristy
SM243
St Michaels, MD, USA, heading South soon.

On Nov 16, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...> wrote:


Hi Everybody,

we just registered a few days ago with the Amel Owners Group and thought its no a bad idea to introduce our self.  

Michaela & myself (Volker) just bought a Amel Santorin from 1990 (SN 027). The boat is currently in Borneo/Malaysia, however we will bring her back to Langkawi/Malaysia soon.

We are long term expats in Malaysia. Our previous boat, a Hans Christian 43, was sold a couple of years ago because work commitment was too high, however now time is "ours" and we plan to explore the Andaman Sea and in future most likely a "bit" further as well with our Amel.

We took the chance to rename the boat, she is now called "Aquamarine"

I started to read with much interest the mails from the group and enjoy the information shared.

Since our Amel is not quite new, I am sure we will have as well "this & that" to share or to ask the group about some advice.

Greetings from Malaysia

Volker & Michaela


Re: Folding Prop

Herbert Lackner
 

Hi Volker,

If you have the shaft alternator installed I would keep the fixed prop. The shaft alternator on the SN is excellent for cruising.

Fair winds and have fun with your SN

Herbert, SN120, Kali Mera, Mazatlan


Re: Lashing the helm on a Super Maramu

rossirossix4
 
Edited

Yes it is a really nice piece of gear and allows you to clamp the helm firmly and quickly in any position and easily re-position anywhere except exactly over the 3 spokes.  In 15 years of use (8 by us) there is not a mark on the leather of the helm from its use and yes, we have used it in heaving to.  Not sure why Amel could not whip up some more units....seems like there could be lots of takers--and not just Super Maramus.

I became curious and checked my pdf records--on the invoice it is "Systeme blocage barre a roue" which translates to "steering wheel lock system".  In our rarefied sense of costs it was "0.2 BOAT Units" (BOAT=Break Out Another Thousand)  https://photos.app.goo.gl/vcenCvZ9e7wBq6iN9
No problem at all from the fuel dock incident but I do think about it every time we dock or get fuel.
Bob
KAIMI SM429


Re: Folding Prop

Matt Salatino
 

A feathering prop has better control at only a minimal increase in drag over a folding prop.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Nov 16, 2019, at 11:18 PM, Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...> wrote:

Hello Santorin Owners,

I just bought a Santorin (Hull # 027) and playing with the Idea of having a folding prop instead of the fixed one - does anyone having experience with this. 

Volker
SY Aquamarine
Santorin 027


Folding Prop

Volker Hasenauer
 

Hello Santorin Owners,

I just bought a Santorin (Hull # 027) and playing with the Idea of having a folding prop instead of the fixed one - does anyone having experience with this. 

Volker
SY Aquamarine
Santorin 027


Re: Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

david bruce
 

Thanks for sharing this Miles, helpful to those of us who have yet to experience such conditions and or are relative novice Amel owners. 

Best, 
Dave 
Liesse
SN006



On Nov 16, 2019, at 2:11 PM, Miles <milesbid@...> wrote:

Hi Aldo,

After some new periods of heaving to, I thought I would share my experiences with the group and repeat the stories that I have told to you—please be patient, it is not all old.

The first time was in Hurricane Mitch which had crossed Florida back into the Atlantic, become a hurricane again, and was moving a 30 mph.   I had about two hours warning on my SSB (no satellite connections back then).  I prepared two drogues at the stern and a huge sea anchor at the bow.  The sea anchor was attached with 100 meters of big line, 20 meters of heavy chain, and another 100 meters of line.  I had the drogues and the sea anchor in the cockpit ready to be deployed.

When the storm arrived, I didn’t use the drogues because some of the waves were breaking and turning around didn’t seem to be a good idea; and before deploying the sea anchor, I wanted to see how long I could heave to.  I had about half the main out and a very small amount of jib, backed.  I have a big eye bolt about 2 feet under the engine controls for tying the wheel.  I used a heavy bungee that lets the wheel move some with the forces.  I tied the wheel so that the boat would head into the wind somewhat until a big wave landed on it and pushed it more sideways, after which it would head up for the next wave.  I had backed the jib because I was afraid the boat would tack through the wind.  It never came close.  The wind increased into the 60s and then the 70s.  The boat just kept doing the same thing and never felt in danger.  At some speed, the sails would have to have come down.  I was amazed that I didn’t feel this with the winds in the 70s.  The worst part was the noise.  Ear plugs would have helped.

Since then I have hove to in much less wind using just the main.  I have used this for repairs or for just a nice meal.   I find it remarkable how the sea appears to be more calm and the motion decreased when hove to. 

I had occasion to do a serious heaving to two weeks ago, on the way from Newport to Bermuda, I tried to race a storm across the Gulf Stream.  The storm won.  I hove to when the wind was in the thirties.  The wind increased into the forties and sometimes into the fifties.  I hove to under about half the main and the wheel tied with a very heavy bungee so that the boat would head up at about 2+ knots to about 40 degrees and then fall off to about 60-70 degrees and then head up again.  We averaged about 2 k forward speed.  As soon as I hove to, the commotion, the crashing into and off waves, and the waves washing over the boat simply stopped. Nothing landed in the cockpit.  The wind direction slowly changed and after 4-5 hours, I was able to add a little jib and sail out of the GS.  I think that the forereaching protects the rudder.  If the boat were to be thrown backwards by a wave, the forces on the rudder would be very great.

That is my experience. There is no “right way” to heave to.  I strongly recommend that everyone contemplating going off shore spend some time experimenting with different amounts of sail and rudder angles.  There will be some combination that feels best to you and to the boat. 

 

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216, resting at the dock at Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Contract done..boat bought

Volker Hasenauer
 

Thanks Jeremy for your welcome email! 

Volker
SY Aqumarine
Santorin #027
Langkawi/Malaysia



On Sat, Nov 16, 2019 at 4:23 AM mr_hermanns <jeremy@...> wrote:
Congrats Volker!!! Welcome to the Amel Family ;)
--
Jeremy Hermanns - "Jer"
SVCerulean.com
Maramu #105
Marina Del Rey, CA


Re: Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

Aldo Roldan
 

Thank you, Miles.  When you are back I Newport, we can hopefully sail together and get Araucaria to heave to.  In the meantime, have a great time in Martinique!

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Townsend
Sent: Saturday, November 16, 2019 5:28 PM
To: Ian Townsend <townsend.ian.michael@...>; main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Miles <milesbid@...>

Date: 2019-11-16 17:11 (GMT-05:00)

Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

 

Hi Aldo,

After some new periods of heaving to, I thought I would share my experiences with the group and repeat the stories that I have told to you—please be patient, it is not all old.

The first time was in Hurricane Mitch which had crossed Florida back into the Atlantic, become a hurricane again, and was moving a 30 mph.   I had about two hours warning on my SSB (no satellite connections back then).  I prepared two drogues at the stern and a huge sea anchor at the bow.  The sea anchor was attached with 100 meters of big line, 20 meters of heavy chain, and another 100 meters of line.  I had the drogues and the sea anchor in the cockpit ready to be deployed.

When the storm arrived, I didn’t use the drogues because some of the waves were breaking and turning around didn’t seem to be a good idea; and before deploying the sea anchor, I wanted to see how long I could heave to.  I had about half the main out and a very small amount of jib, backed.  I have a big eye bolt about 2 feet under the engine controls for tying the wheel.  I used a heavy bungee that lets the wheel move some with the forces.  I tied the wheel so that the boat would head into the wind somewhat until a big wave landed on it and pushed it more sideways, after which it would head up for the next wave.  I had backed the jib because I was afraid the boat would tack through the wind.  It never came close.  The wind increased into the 60s and then the 70s.  The boat just kept doing the same thing and never felt in danger.  At some speed, the sails would have to have come down.  I was amazed that I didn’t feel this with the winds in the 70s.  The worst part was the noise.  Ear plugs would have helped.

Since then I have hove to in much less wind using just the main.  I have used this for repairs or for just a nice meal.   I find it remarkable how the sea appears to be more calm and the motion decreased when hove to. 

I had occasion to do a serious heaving to two weeks ago, on the way from Newport to Bermuda, I tried to race a storm across the Gulf Stream.  The storm won.  I hove to when the wind was in the thirties.  The wind increased into the forties and sometimes into the fifties.  I hove to under about half the main and the wheel tied with a very heavy bungee so that the boat would head up at about 2+ knots to about 40 degrees and then fall off to about 60-70 degrees and then head up again.  We averaged about 2 k forward speed.  As soon as I hove to, the commotion, the crashing into and off waves, and the waves washing over the boat simply stopped. Nothing landed in the cockpit.  The wind direction slowly changed and after 4-5 hours, I was able to add a little jib and sail out of the GS.  I think that the forereaching protects the rudder.  If the boat were to be thrown backwards by a wave, the forces on the rudder would be very great.

That is my experience. There is no “right way” to heave to.  I strongly recommend that everyone contemplating going off shore spend some time experimenting with different amounts of sail and rudder angles.  There will be some combination that feels best to you and to the boat. 

 

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216, resting at the dock at Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

Ian Townsend
 





Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: Miles <milesbid@...>
Date: 2019-11-16 17:11 (GMT-05:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

Hi Aldo,

After some new periods of heaving to, I thought I would share my experiences with the group and repeat the stories that I have told to you—please be patient, it is not all old.

The first time was in Hurricane Mitch which had crossed Florida back into the Atlantic, become a hurricane again, and was moving a 30 mph.   I had about two hours warning on my SSB (no satellite connections back then).  I prepared two drogues at the stern and a huge sea anchor at the bow.  The sea anchor was attached with 100 meters of big line, 20 meters of heavy chain, and another 100 meters of line.  I had the drogues and the sea anchor in the cockpit ready to be deployed.

When the storm arrived, I didn’t use the drogues because some of the waves were breaking and turning around didn’t seem to be a good idea; and before deploying the sea anchor, I wanted to see how long I could heave to.  I had about half the main out and a very small amount of jib, backed.  I have a big eye bolt about 2 feet under the engine controls for tying the wheel.  I used a heavy bungee that lets the wheel move some with the forces.  I tied the wheel so that the boat would head into the wind somewhat until a big wave landed on it and pushed it more sideways, after which it would head up for the next wave.  I had backed the jib because I was afraid the boat would tack through the wind.  It never came close.  The wind increased into the 60s and then the 70s.  The boat just kept doing the same thing and never felt in danger.  At some speed, the sails would have to have come down.  I was amazed that I didn’t feel this with the winds in the 70s.  The worst part was the noise.  Ear plugs would have helped.

Since then I have hove to in much less wind using just the main.  I have used this for repairs or for just a nice meal.   I find it remarkable how the sea appears to be more calm and the motion decreased when hove to. 

I had occasion to do a serious heaving to two weeks ago, on the way from Newport to Bermuda, I tried to race a storm across the Gulf Stream.  The storm won.  I hove to when the wind was in the thirties.  The wind increased into the forties and sometimes into the fifties.  I hove to under about half the main and the wheel tied with a very heavy bungee so that the boat would head up at about 2+ knots to about 40 degrees and then fall off to about 60-70 degrees and then head up again.  We averaged about 2 k forward speed.  As soon as I hove to, the commotion, the crashing into and off waves, and the waves washing over the boat simply stopped. Nothing landed in the cockpit.  The wind direction slowly changed and after 4-5 hours, I was able to add a little jib and sail out of the GS.  I think that the forereaching protects the rudder.  If the boat were to be thrown backwards by a wave, the forces on the rudder would be very great.

That is my experience. There is no “right way” to heave to.  I strongly recommend that everyone contemplating going off shore spend some time experimenting with different amounts of sail and rudder angles.  There will be some combination that feels best to you and to the boat. 

 

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216, resting at the dock at Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Raymarine autopilot

ngtnewington Newington
 

Maybe I should just stick with what I got and not worry about it?

If it ain’t broke .....
Nick

S/Y Amelia
AML 54-019

On 16 Nov 2019, at 18:38, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I delighted with my Raymarine Autopilot. It has been great but it is now 13 years old. Having done a lot of hand steering on my first boat, we only had a servo pendulum windvane, I know how tedious it can be. I would much rather be light on crew but have autopilot back up.
So how reliable do other owners find these Raymarine autopilots? Am I just lucky?

To that end I am thinking of buying a spare to have on board, including a new linear drive unit.

The new Raymarine would be the obvious choice;
Exactly same linear drive unit
New fancy heading sensor EV1
ACU400 drive
P70 control

Does anyone have any thoughts.

Nick
Amelia AML54-019
Ashore Kilada Greece



Re: Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

Miles
 

Hi Aldo,

After some new periods of heaving to, I thought I would share my experiences with the group and repeat the stories that I have told to you—please be patient, it is not all old.

The first time was in Hurricane Mitch which had crossed Florida back into the Atlantic, become a hurricane again, and was moving a 30 mph.   I had about two hours warning on my SSB (no satellite connections back then).  I prepared two drogues at the stern and a huge sea anchor at the bow.  The sea anchor was attached with 100 meters of big line, 20 meters of heavy chain, and another 100 meters of line.  I had the drogues and the sea anchor in the cockpit ready to be deployed.

When the storm arrived, I didn’t use the drogues because some of the waves were breaking and turning around didn’t seem to be a good idea; and before deploying the sea anchor, I wanted to see how long I could heave to.  I had about half the main out and a very small amount of jib, backed.  I have a big eye bolt about 2 feet under the engine controls for tying the wheel.  I used a heavy bungee that lets the wheel move some with the forces.  I tied the wheel so that the boat would head into the wind somewhat until a big wave landed on it and pushed it more sideways, after which it would head up for the next wave.  I had backed the jib because I was afraid the boat would tack through the wind.  It never came close.  The wind increased into the 60s and then the 70s.  The boat just kept doing the same thing and never felt in danger.  At some speed, the sails would have to have come down.  I was amazed that I didn’t feel this with the winds in the 70s.  The worst part was the noise.  Ear plugs would have helped.

Since then I have hove to in much less wind using just the main.  I have used this for repairs or for just a nice meal.   I find it remarkable how the sea appears to be more calm and the motion decreased when hove to. 

I had occasion to do a serious heaving to two weeks ago, on the way from Newport to Bermuda, I tried to race a storm across the Gulf Stream.  The storm won.  I hove to when the wind was in the thirties.  The wind increased into the forties and sometimes into the fifties.  I hove to under about half the main and the wheel tied with a very heavy bungee so that the boat would head up at about 2+ knots to about 40 degrees and then fall off to about 60-70 degrees and then head up again.  We averaged about 2 k forward speed.  As soon as I hove to, the commotion, the crashing into and off waves, and the waves washing over the boat simply stopped. Nothing landed in the cockpit.  The wind direction slowly changed and after 4-5 hours, I was able to add a little jib and sail out of the GS.  I think that the forereaching protects the rudder.  If the boat were to be thrown backwards by a wave, the forces on the rudder would be very great.

That is my experience. There is no “right way” to heave to.  I strongly recommend that everyone contemplating going off shore spend some time experimenting with different amounts of sail and rudder angles.  There will be some combination that feels best to you and to the boat. 

 

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216, resting at the dock at Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Raymarine autopilot

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Nick,
We have both the linear drive on the quadrant and a rotary drive , both Raymarine , with a switch over . Not missed a beat in 19 years and 63,000 miles . Pochon in Hyeres ( v. good ) took both off the boat after about 55,000 miles and serviced them but said but said both were in good condition

Ian and Judy , Pen Azen SM 302 Kilada

On 16 Nov 2019, at 18:38, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I delighted with my Raymarine Autopilot. It has been great but it is now 13 years old. Having done a lot of hand steering on my first boat, we only had a servo pendulum windvane, I know how tedious it can be. I would much rather be light on crew but have autopilot back up.
So how reliable do other owners find these Raymarine autopilots? Am I just lucky?

To that end I am thinking of buying a spare to have on board, including a new linear drive unit.

The new Raymarine would be the obvious choice;
Exactly same linear drive unit
New fancy heading sensor EV1
ACU400 drive
P70 control

Does anyone have any thoughts.

Nick
Amelia AML54-019
Ashore Kilada Greece