Date   

Re: Free or Tie-on the steering wheel

Rudolf Waldispuehl
 

Hi Pat 
You’re absolutely right. It’s not a good Idea. 
I tried have done it also with flex bungee cables. In some place it works well. Not much shock on the cables. Sometimes I had it too loose so the rudder was moving. 
Thanks Danny and Paul for your advice. 
Best regards
Ruedi 
WASABI A54-55

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io" <sailw32@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Mittwoch, 18. September 2019 um 20:21
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Free or Tie-on the steering wheel

Ruedi, I would advise against securing the quadrant ,in the event of an emergency a boat should be ready to move immediately . Having to leave the cockpit and go down to the aft stateroom ,lift the bed and untie the quadrant sounds like a bad idea.
I have a small stainless hook secured to the bulkhead about six inches below the wheel ,I use a black rubber bungee with hooks on the ends , I put those hooks over two of  the spokes on the wheel and the bungee under the hook. This allows a very little bit of play, but 99 % a the time no movement at all and we live on a mooring. I can unsecure the wheel in one second if need be.
Good Luck,
Pat
SM Shenanigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Sep 18, 2019 2:03 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Free or Tie-on the steering wheel

Hi Ruedi, if the wheel is tied tight and there is clonking it is possible your steering cables need adjustment. Easy to do where they are mounted by the quadrant. Just like adjusting cables on a bicycle.
Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
On 19 September 2019 at 00:19 "jlm@..." <jlm@...> wrote:

Hi Ruedi,
The best is to fix it, but if you fix it it MUST be without any gap (possibility that the rude can move) ... else do not fix it ...
JLMERTZ
CottonBay


Le 18/09/2019 à 11:52, Rudolf Waldispuehl a écrit :
Dear Amel'ias

I’m curious about experience with tie on the steering wheel and maybe someone has a proven technical answer. 
When I’m on Anchor or in a Marina I always fix/tie the steering wheel in the cockpit with a rope. After this summer in many anchorages with some swell I was not sure anymore if these is the right solution. 
 
Always when small waves hitting the rudder the wheel tried to turn in one or other direction and there is a noticeable noise (little dong) on the cables. 
When I was loosing the rope then the noise was notable under the aft bed because the Autopilot linear drive gear is moving and made noise.   
I’m now quite unsecure which option is the better, -  fix the wheel or let it move around?  Both ways are working on either AP Linear drive and/or steering cables. 
 
Would be the best option to make a fix/tie on the rudder quadrant to stop moving? Has someone done it?
What is your experience and long-term observations? 
 
Thanks for your thought and best regards
Ruedi
SY-WASABI 
AMEL 54#55

Garanti sans virus. www.avast.com

 

 


Re: Mast foot rubber seal pad

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Nick,

I’m not implying you mast is dancing on the deck in rough seas but as you rightfully say there is flexibility in the stays, the hull itself and what have you not. As both the deck under the mast and the underside of the mast have quite hard surfaces, the pad is just there to take the edge off the impact, much like the silent blocks in the suspension of a car.
Regrettably I was not there when they replaced the pad, but someone told me they use a rig that has some hydraulic jacks. You could ask them about it.

Regards,

Arno,
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main Sail Furling Motor Issue

 

Mark,

There has been some information out here that the seal is VA45mmX60mmX7mm Seal  OR 45mmX58mmX7mm. The middle dimension is the shaft size. I know for a fact that Amel 54 #69 had a 58mm shaft. One SM owner recorded his as 60mm, but was not 100% sure.

Can you verify this issue?

Your advice certainly applies to all Santorins, Super Maramus, and 54s. 

Bill

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Wed, Sep 18, 2019 at 5:43 PM Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:
Just a friendly reminder to my fellow Amel owners to do a regular check on the shaft seal that sits over the main furler cylinder.  It's the one circled in RED in the picture below:


I would advise you have look at it ASAP and put it on your annual maintenance list to at least inspect it's condition and if it's at all questionable, replace it.  It costs less than $5 to buy a new one but could end up costing you hundreds of $ or more if it fails and you destroy the gears.  Don't be like me and wait until your main furler seizes before you check it!

Here is a picture of my seal.  It actually has a split in it so I use the term "seal" loosely:



I can confirm that it is a VA-45 or VA-045 V-ring Seal as you can faintly see "VA 45" molded into the rubber in the upper left side of the picture. 

The failed seal has allowed saltwater, rainwater and dirt to enter the furler cylinder for some time now and it eventually destroyed the tapered roller bearing that sits at the top of the the shaft.  Here is what my bearing looked like when I got it off the shaft AFTER I cleaned it up:





Needless to say the bearing is completely destroyed.  Obviously this did not happen overnight but has been going on for a long time.  I've owned my boat for just over two years now and surprisingly the main furler has worked almost all of the time.  It did pop a breaker now and again but I attributed that to the motor brushes being old and worn and all the carbon dust that was inside the motor when I took it apart this spring to clean and change the brushes.  I'm sure that the worn brushes and carbon dust did not help things, but the main culprit was clearly the corroded roller bearing caused by the failed V-ring Seal.  

I would highly recommend that you have look at your furler seal now and inspect it on regular basis.  If you find it cracked, damaged or missing I suggest that you take the furler assembly down and open it up, clean the inside and inspect the bearing as well as the other ball bearing, three lip seals, and two o-rings that are inside.  It does not take that long nor require any special tools to do this tear down and inspection.  If you do need to change bearings, a bearing puller certainly makes the job easier.

Thanks to Duane (Wanderer) and Pat (Shenanigans) and others on this forum for some excellent pictures, part numbers and sources for replacement parts.  Some if the information is spread around a bit here so once I am sure that I have all of the correct information regarding all the replacement parts that I needed to do the rebuild I will make another post here to try to get it all in one place.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Re: Steyr impeller maintenance

Paul Brown
 

Hello Jose 

I am going to remove the raw water pump and replace the impeller that way, it may take longer but I expect it to be easier.

I’ll let you know if it does work out easier 

Regards Paul - Fortuna II 55/17


On 19 Sep 2019, at 12:54 am, Jose Alegria <Josealegr@...> wrote:

Paul hello

You are correct; it is almost impossible take out the impeller without remove the oil filter first.
I change the impeller and after take out the oil filter is ± easy change the impeller 
Regards
Jose Alegria
Amel55#003 - MERIT


Re: Steyr impeller maintenance

Jose Alegria
 

Paul hello

You are correct; it is almost impossible take out the impeller without remove the oil filter first.
I change the impeller and after take out the oil filter is ± easy change the impeller 
Regards
Jose Alegria
Amel55#003 - MERIT


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main Sail Furling Motor Issue

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

Just a friendly reminder to my fellow Amel owners to do a regular check on the shaft seal that sits over the main furler cylinder.  It's the one circled in RED in the picture below:


I would advise you have look at it ASAP and put it on your annual maintenance list to at least inspect it's condition and if it's at all questionable, replace it.  It costs less than $5 to buy a new one but could end up costing you hundreds of $ or more if it fails and you destroy the gears.  Don't be like me and wait until your main furler seizes before you check it!

Here is a picture of my seal.  It actually has a split in it so I use the term "seal" loosely:



I can confirm that it is a VA-45 or VA-045 V-ring Seal as you can faintly see "VA 45" molded into the rubber in the upper left side of the picture. 

The failed seal has allowed saltwater, rainwater and dirt to enter the furler cylinder for some time now and it eventually destroyed the tapered roller bearing that sits at the top of the shaft.  Here is what my bearing looked like when I got it off the shaft AFTER I cleaned it up:





Needless to say the bearing is completely destroyed.  Obviously this did not happen overnight but has been going on for a long time.  I've owned my boat for just over two years now and surprisingly the main furler has worked almost all of the time.  It did pop a breaker now and again but I attributed that to the motor brushes being old and worn and all the carbon dust that was inside the motor when I took it apart this spring to clean and change the brushes.  I'm sure that the worn brushes and carbon dust did not help things, but the main culprit was clearly the corroded roller bearing caused by the failed V-ring Seal.  

I would highly recommend that you have look at your furler seal now and inspect it on regular basis.  If you find it cracked, damaged or missing I suggest that you take the furler assembly down and open it up, clean the inside and inspect the bearing as well as the other ball bearing, three lip seals, and two o-rings that are inside.  It does not take that long nor require any special tools to do this tear down and inspection.  If you do need to change bearings, a bearing puller certainly makes the job easier.

Thanks to Duane (Wanderer) and Pat (Shenanigans) and others on this forum for some excellent pictures, part numbers and sources for replacement parts.  Some if the information is spread around a bit here so once I am sure that I have all of the correct information regarding all the replacement parts that I needed to do the rebuild I will make another post here to try to get it all in one place.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Re: EPIRB mounting location

Vic Fryzel
 

Where did you end up mounting it?


Re: Mast foot rubber seal pad

 

Porter,

One of the best Amel riggers is Phil Ash, Gulf Harbour Rigging in Gulf harbour Marina.
Gulf Harbour Rigging
Gulf Harbour Marina
P.O.Box 729
Whangaparaoa 0943
Auckland
New Zealand
Phone: +64 9 424 1320
Mobile: +64 27 292 7198
Email: phil"at"gulfharbourrigging.co.nz

The Amel Matinique tool is basically a custom metal frame used with a hydraulic jack that lifts the mast just high enough to replace the mast pad. I have seen it, but do not have a photo of it.


--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Wed, Sep 18, 2019 at 1:16 PM Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Our main past pad is nearly nonexistent now. Plan to change it in NZ. The shrouds are still incredibly tight, on the lee side as well.  I suspect a slight loosening of the forestay. When changing load directions there is a small shimmy in the boat which I suspect is new, but I doubt myself. 
Regardless, the rig seems tight and integrous (with a magnifying glass at the shroud based) but plan on a change in NZ, the primary reason being this pad, and going into the 10th year new wire seems prudent. 

I am considering doing the rewire myself, ordering the ACMO and then having a rigger check my work vs, since I have to get a crane to lift the mast, just have the whole thing done by a rigger- wire and all. 

The only reason I have to pull the mast is this mast pad: has anyone seen the Martinique gizmo that obviates that need in order to replace the pad?  

Any experience with rerigging one’s self?

Any suggestions for a rigger around Auckland?  

As always thanks for your help. This forum is such a wonderful resource. 


Porter McRoberts 
A54-152
Vava’u Tonga


Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Sep 19, 2019, at 6:54 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Hi Arno,

Did the guys in Martinique actually tell you the pad was to dampen the load on the deck when pounding?

I can not imagine that there will really be any give in it, after the rig is tensioned. The worst thing for a mast is for it to go slack and then tight again. If the pad really is for that purpose then that is what would happen, obviously to a very small degree. The compression load on that mast base must be immense. If we say that the rigging is tensioned to 50% of the wire strength and work out the angles, the downward vector of all the shroud tensions added together must be in the order of 50-100 tons. (very quick mental arithmetic)

Although Amels are very well constructed there must be much more spring in the whole structure of the boat than that 5mm plate. All boats bend a little, which is most of the reason that when sailing in a stiff breeze there is much less tension on the leeward shrouds. That and the stretch the wire itself, which is actually quite a lot.

I do not know for sure but I think the pad is to prevent the paint on the base of the mast from chipping. As you point out it is interesting to note that the mizzen plate lasts longer. Maybe that is not from less compression but because it is less exposed to sun and sea. It is interesting, and I would like to know for sure.

Nick
Amelia 
AML54-019
On 18 Sep 2019, at 18:19, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Hi Ruedi,
Strange answer you have got from Amel as the crew in Martinique has even build a special rig to replace the pad with a standing mast. It is meant to dampen the forces of the mast on the deck when sailing turbulent seas. Mine was replaced when I bought the boat (July 2018), nine years old. The one under the mizzen does not receive much pounding so it stays much better over time.

Regards,

Arno
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Free or Tie-on the steering wheel

Patrick McAneny
 

Ruedi, I would advise against securing the quadrant ,in the event of an emergency a boat should be ready to move immediately . Having to leave the cockpit and go down to the aft stateroom ,lift the bed and untie the quadrant sounds like a bad idea.
I have a small stainless hook secured to the bulkhead about six inches below the wheel ,I use a black rubber bungee with hooks on the ends , I put those hooks over two of  the spokes on the wheel and the bungee under the hook. This allows a very little bit of play, but 99 % a the time no movement at all and we live on a mooring. I can unsecure the wheel in one second if need be.
Good Luck,
Pat
SM Shenanigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Sep 18, 2019 2:03 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Free or Tie-on the steering wheel

Hi Ruedi, if the wheel is tied tight and there is clonking it is possible your steering cables need adjustment. Easy to do where they are mounted by the quadrant. Just like adjusting cables on a bicycle.
Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
On 19 September 2019 at 00:19 "jlm@..." <jlm@...> wrote:

Hi Ruedi,
The best is to fix it, but if you fix it it MUST be without any gap (possibility that the rude can move) ... else do not fix it ...
JLMERTZ
CottonBay


Le 18/09/2019 à 11:52, Rudolf Waldispuehl a écrit :
Dear Amel'ias

I’m curious about experience with tie on the steering wheel and maybe someone has a proven technical answer. 
When I’m on Anchor or in a Marina I always fix/tie the steering wheel in the cockpit with a rope. After this summer in many anchorages with some swell I was not sure anymore if these is the right solution. 
 
Always when small waves hitting the rudder the wheel tried to turn in one or other direction and there is a noticeable noise (little dong) on the cables. 
When I was loosing the rope then the noise was notable under the aft bed because the Autopilot linear drive gear is moving and made noise.   
I’m now quite unsecure which option is the better, -  fix the wheel or let it move around?  Both ways are working on either AP Linear drive and/or steering cables. 
 
Would be the best option to make a fix/tie on the rudder quadrant to stop moving? Has someone done it?
What is your experience and long-term observations? 
 
Thanks for your thought and best regards
Ruedi
SY-WASABI 
AMEL 54#55

Garanti sans virus. www.avast.com

 

 


Re: Mast foot rubber seal pad

Porter McRoberts
 

Our main past pad is nearly nonexistent now. Plan to change it in NZ. The shrouds are still incredibly tight, on the lee side as well.  I suspect a slight loosening of the forestay. When changing load directions there is a small shimmy in the boat which I suspect is new, but I doubt myself. 
Regardless, the rig seems tight and integrous (with a magnifying glass at the shroud based) but plan on a change in NZ, the primary reason being this pad, and going into the 10th year new wire seems prudent. 

I am considering doing the rewire myself, ordering the ACMO and then having a rigger check my work vs, since I have to get a crane to lift the mast, just have the whole thing done by a rigger- wire and all. 

The only reason I have to pull the mast is this mast pad: has anyone seen the Martinique gizmo that obviates that need in order to replace the pad?  

Any experience with rerigging one’s self?

Any suggestions for a rigger around Auckland?  

As always thanks for your help. This forum is such a wonderful resource. 


Porter McRoberts 
A54-152
Vava’u Tonga


Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Sep 19, 2019, at 6:54 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Hi Arno,

Did the guys in Martinique actually tell you the pad was to dampen the load on the deck when pounding?

I can not imagine that there will really be any give in it, after the rig is tensioned. The worst thing for a mast is for it to go slack and then tight again. If the pad really is for that purpose then that is what would happen, obviously to a very small degree. The compression load on that mast base must be immense. If we say that the rigging is tensioned to 50% of the wire strength and work out the angles, the downward vector of all the shroud tensions added together must be in the order of 50-100 tons. (very quick mental arithmetic)

Although Amels are very well constructed there must be much more spring in the whole structure of the boat than that 5mm plate. All boats bend a little, which is most of the reason that when sailing in a stiff breeze there is much less tension on the leeward shrouds. That and the stretch the wire itself, which is actually quite a lot.

I do not know for sure but I think the pad is to prevent the paint on the base of the mast from chipping. As you point out it is interesting to note that the mizzen plate lasts longer. Maybe that is not from less compression but because it is less exposed to sun and sea. It is interesting, and I would like to know for sure.

Nick
Amelia 
AML54-019
On 18 Sep 2019, at 18:19, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Hi Ruedi,
Strange answer you have got from Amel as the crew in Martinique has even build a special rig to replace the pad with a standing mast. It is meant to dampen the forces of the mast on the deck when sailing turbulent seas. Mine was replaced when I bought the boat (July 2018), nine years old. The one under the mizzen does not receive much pounding so it stays much better over time.

Regards,

Arno
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Free or Tie-on the steering wheel

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Ruedi, if the wheel is tied tight and there is clonking it is possible your steering cables need adjustment. Easy to do where they are mounted by the quadrant. Just like adjusting cables on a bicycle.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 19 September 2019 at 00:19 "jlm@..." <jlm@...> wrote:

Hi Ruedi,

The best is to fix it, but if you fix it it MUST be without any gap (possibility that the rude can move) ... else do not fix it ...

JLMERTZ

CottonBay



Le 18/09/2019 à 11:52, Rudolf Waldispuehl a écrit :

Dear Amel'ias

I’m curious about experience with tie on the steering wheel and maybe someone has a proven technical answer. 

When I’m on Anchor or in a Marina I always fix/tie the steering wheel in the cockpit with a rope. After this summer in many anchorages with some swell I was not sure anymore if these is the right solution. 

 

Always when small waves hitting the rudder the wheel tried to turn in one or other direction and there is a noticeable noise (little dong) on the cables. 

When I was loosing the rope then the noise was notable under the aft bed because the Autopilot linear drive gear is moving and made noise.   

I’m now quite unsecure which option is the better, -  fix the wheel or let it move around?  Both ways are working on either AP Linear drive and/or steering cables. 

 

Would be the best option to make a fix/tie on the rudder quadrant to stop moving? Has someone done it?
What is your experience and long-term observations? 

 

Thanks for your thought and best regards

Ruedi

SY-WASABI 

AMEL 54#55


Garanti sans virus. www.avast.com


 


 


Re: Mast foot rubber seal pad

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Arno,

Did the guys in Martinique actually tell you the pad was to dampen the load on the deck when pounding?

I can not imagine that there will really be any give in it, after the rig is tensioned. The worst thing for a mast is for it to go slack and then tight again. If the pad really is for that purpose then that is what would happen, obviously to a very small degree. The compression load on that mast base must be immense. If we say that the rigging is tensioned to 50% of the wire strength and work out the angles, the downward vector of all the shroud tensions added together must be in the order of 50-100 tons. (very quick mental arithmetic)

Although Amels are very well constructed there must be much more spring in the whole structure of the boat than that 5mm plate. All boats bend a little, which is most of the reason that when sailing in a stiff breeze there is much less tension on the leeward shrouds. That and the stretch the wire itself, which is actually quite a lot.

I do not know for sure but I think the pad is to prevent the paint on the base of the mast from chipping. As you point out it is interesting to note that the mizzen plate lasts longer. Maybe that is not from less compression but because it is less exposed to sun and sea. It is interesting, and I would like to know for sure.

Nick
Amelia 
AML54-019

On 18 Sep 2019, at 18:19, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Hi Ruedi,
Strange answer you have got from Amel as the crew in Martinique has even build a special rig to replace the pad with a standing mast. It is meant to dampen the forces of the mast on the deck when sailing turbulent seas. Mine was replaced when I bought the boat (July 2018), nine years old. The one under the mizzen does not receive much pounding so it stays much better over time.

Regards,

Arno
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Free or Tie-on the steering wheel

Paul Osterberg
 

I use shokcord to secure the steering wheel that give some flex.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259 Lagos, Portugal 


Re: Mast foot rubber seal pad

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Ruedi,
Strange answer you have got from Amel as the crew in Martinique has even build a special rig to replace the pad with a standing mast. It is meant to dampen the forces of the mast on the deck when sailing turbulent seas. Mine was replaced when I bought the boat (July 2018), nine years old. The one under the mizzen does not receive much pounding so it stays much better over time.

Regards,

Arno
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Mast foot rubber seal pad

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Ruedi,

The pad under my mast is pretty feeble and crumbly. I have scraped it out and regularly blast it with fresh water. It is barely visible now. As for the rig tension, to my eye the main mast on Amelia could do with a touch more rake aft, so I have left the forstay and staysail stay and baby stay  as they were and tensioned the rest a turn or two. It is all bar taught and even when sailing in say 15 knots true wind the lee shrouds are still very firm. I have also had a good look at the mast base when sailing upwind at 9 knots boat speed, dropping off waves. There is no movement. So I am happy to leave it be until such a time that I pull the mast down when I will have a new Tufnol one made.

Happy sailing

Nick
Amelia 
AML 54-019

On 18 Sep 2019, at 16:47, Roque <ediroque@...> wrote:

Hi Ruedi

If the leak you are worried about is water getting inside the boat, then don’t. This pad is not intended to seal that.

It is made out of PU (polyurethane), 90 SH (“hardness”), 5 mm thick. Several A54 reported a short life span of this material. Mine was paper thin after 8 years. The Mizzen pad usually holds longer.

I have discussed this with a few experienced Amel owners and with a very knowledgeable Naval Engineer who build boats over 100 ft. and it seems that replacing it with phenolic laminated (such as Tufnol), would be an improvement. It is a little harder (103 SH), though. 

Regarding Amel statement that “Even if it looks ugly and very worn there is no need to change it”, I would only add that, as it gets thinner and thinner, you have to check and adjust the standing rigging. 

Enjoy Sicily

Roque

Attika A54 117

Paraty- Rio de Janeiro


Em qua, 18 de set de 2019 às 06:48, Rudolf Waldispuehl <Rudolf@...> escreveu:
Hi Folks 

The mast foot rubber pad on my boat is quite brown and very brittle. I’m a bit nervous that it will leak one day (see pictures). 
I heard from Barry “Lady Penelope II” that he changed the Mast-Foot Rubber Pad in Hieres recently. 

 

I asked AMEL and got the answer that they haven’t done it very often and I should not worry about it. “Even it looks ugly and very worn there is no need to change it”, Amel said. In Hieres they did it first time 2 weeks ago with “Lady Penelope II”. Barry mentioned the rubber was like fluid and I’m confused about the answers from AMEL. 
What is your experience and who has done it on their SM or 54 over the years? 

 

Thanks a lot and kind regards
Ruedi 

 

SY-WASABI 
AMEL 54#55
Sicily




Re: Mast foot rubber seal pad

Roque
 

Hi Ruedi

If the leak you are worried about is water getting inside the boat, then don’t. This pad is not intended to seal that.

It is made out of PU (polyurethane), 90 SH (“hardness”), 5 mm thick. Several A54 reported a short life span of this material. Mine was paper thin after 8 years. The Mizzen pad usually holds longer.

I have discussed this with a few experienced Amel owners and with a very knowledgeable Naval Engineer who build boats over 100 ft. and it seems that replacing it with phenolic laminated (such as Tufnol), would be an improvement. It is a little harder (103 SH), though. 

Regarding Amel statement that “Even if it looks ugly and very worn there is no need to change it”, I would only add that, as it gets thinner and thinner, you have to check and adjust the standing rigging. 

Enjoy Sicily

Roque

Attika A54 117

Paraty- Rio de Janeiro


Em qua, 18 de set de 2019 às 06:48, Rudolf Waldispuehl <Rudolf@...> escreveu:

Hi Folks 

The mast foot rubber pad on my boat is quite brown and very brittle. I’m a bit nervous that it will leak one day (see pictures). 

I heard from Barry “Lady Penelope II” that he changed the Mast-Foot Rubber Pad in Hieres recently. 

 

I asked AMEL and got the answer that they haven’t done it very often and I should not worry about it. “Even it looks ugly and very worn there is no need to change it”, Amel said. In Hieres they did it first time 2 weeks ago with “Lady Penelope II”. Barry mentioned the rubber was like fluid and I’m confused about the answers from AMEL. 

What is your experience and who has done it on their SM or 54 over the years? 

 

Thanks a lot and kind regards

Ruedi 

 

SY-WASABI 

AMEL 54#55

Sicily


Re: Amel OEM Rigging

Gerhard Mueller
 

I just get new shrouds here in Kalamata, Greece, manufactured by a shop in Athen, Greece and fitted by the sailmaker here. For the Sharki the total is 2800,- Euro.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: OG Maramu Mizzen Sheet Cars

Gerhard Mueller
 

Dennis is correct.
No problem to order a machine shop for a new disk. Often the pin is still OK.
I have changed all disks.


--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: OG Maramu Mizzen Sheet Cars

sbmesasailor
 

Hi Jeremy,

I had a failure just like yours and it was no problem and not very expensive to have a machine shop produce a new disk and pin.

Dennis
Libertad
Maramu #121


Re: Re :[AmelYachtOwners] OG Maramu Mizzen Sheet Cars

Matt Salatino
 

Don Green has a business of making sheaves and rebuilding Genoa cars and blocks.
You can find him on FaceBook and the Sailing and Cruising Page.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Sep 18, 2019, at 1:37 AM, christian alby via Groups.Io <calbyy@...> wrote:

Good day to you,
Try rigrite.com (Rig-rite Inc.)
They are the experts on vintage rigging (goiot incld) & their catalog is well documented.
I need to replace my travelers also & will send them a request.
Good hunting
Christian alby - Desirade VIII - Maramu 116 - Canet


Le mer., sept. 18, 2019 à 2:28, mr_hermanns
<jeremy@...> a écrit :
Hey there!

One of my Mizzen Sheet Cars has died on me - the center disk just shattered when using it last sail.

its a odd ‘Y’ shaped track and any replacement or part advice would be awesome!
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--
Jeremy Hermanns - "Jer"
SVCerulean.com
Maramu #105
Marina Del Rey, CA
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