Date   

Re: Amel Cdrive seal kit

Paul Brown
 

Thank you Jean Luc, this is much appreciated and helpful 

Regards Paul 


On 21 Aug 2019, at 11:15 am, "jlm@..." <jlm@...> wrote:

Paul, in France you have www.123roulement.com .... You will find all what you need with fast delivery ....

Jean Luc


Le 21/08/2019 à 09:53, Paul Brown a écrit :
hello all, I’m inquiring please  for assistance to where I can purchase the Cdrive seal kit and at what estimated price? Can this only be purchased through Amel or is it a standard product from a distributor or manufacturer?

thank you for your time 

regards paul - Fortuna II 55#17



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L'absence de virus dans ce courrier électronique a été vérifiée par le logiciel antivirus Avast.
www.avast.com



Re: Amel Cdrive seal kit

jlm@jlmertz.fr
 

Paul, in France you have www.123roulement.com .... You will find all what you need with fast delivery ....

Jean Luc


Le 21/08/2019 à 09:53, Paul Brown a écrit :
hello all, I’m inquiring please  for assistance to where I can purchase the Cdrive seal kit and at what estimated price? Can this only be purchased through Amel or is it a standard product from a distributor or manufacturer?

thank you for your time 

regards paul - Fortuna II 55#17



Avast logo

L'absence de virus dans ce courrier électronique a été vérifiée par le logiciel antivirus Avast.
www.avast.com



Amel Cdrive seal kit

Paul Brown
 

hello all, I’m inquiring please  for assistance to where I can purchase the Cdrive seal kit and at what estimated price? Can this only be purchased through Amel or is it a standard product from a distributor or manufacturer?

thank you for your time 

regards paul - Fortuna II 55#17


Re: Always check your contractors' work

Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

This is how to go one step farther than just supervising your workers:

When I was in Shelter Bay Marina, there was a mechanic there, I think
they call him the Diesel Whisperer, or something like that... His
name might be Greg, and he is one very good mechanic if you need one
in Panama. I hired him to come over and change the coolant in both
the genset and the engine, and also clean out the heat exchangers
because my engine was overheating slightly at 2200 RPM.

When he got to Aquarius I gave him a cold drink, and said... "Today
this is your job, drink as much as you like, but you have to make sure
I do everything correctly".

He had all the proper tools for making sure that they system would
hold pressure, and he just instructed me on how to take everything
apart, and get it back together properly. So, the next time if I had
to do it, I could do it myself. And, I know it was done properly...
Well, it is still working after 600 hours.

O - The reason for the over-heating... 4 small pieces of impellers in
the heat exchanger from before I owned Aquarius.

Ken Powers
Aquarius
Currently in Indonesia

On 8/20/19, Scott SV Tengah <@Tengah> wrote:
Ah ok, I have not had experience with the refrigeration group.

Good thing you guys didn't take what they said at face value! That said, I
still believe having Amel's office nearby is invaluable so my vote is still
for Le Marin.

The electricians in Southern Spain were nice guys so I am a bit loathe to
hang them out to dry. But given how much additional time and money I have
wasted due to their shoddy work, I've realized that it's more important to
me that no fellow Amel owner has to go through what I did.

The group was Electrical Marine Services in Gibraltar. An English guy and a
South African. Initially I was very happy with their work as they actually
showed up on time or at all, unlike some of the other contractors we hired.
They got the work done on time, unlike the other contractors. As time
passed and problems with their work surfaced, my opinion of them changed.

The primary "other" contractor was MH Preserve at Alcaidesa Marina. They
were overwhelmed and understaffed for the quantity of work we had them do -
keep in mind this is right when we bought the boat. They came recommended by
a surveyor but I surmise they were buddies. Anyways it's run by an English
guy and his father does a lot of the work. With that (reverse?) nepotism,
the father was unfireable and the work quality and pace reflected that.
Additionally the marina makes it very expensive to bring in outside
contractors, so you're stuck with them.

The only reason we were able to leave was because my visa was running out.
Otherwise we'd probably still be there today!

-- Scott
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com




Re: Amel Mango Emergency Tiller Storage Location

marklesparkle59
 

Charles,
My emergency tiller on a Sharki lives in the cockpit lazarette. I might try it out on the
Companionway shelf although I wouldn't want it flying around.
Mark 



Sent from my Samsung device


-------- Original message --------
From: Charles Bell <shipbldr2000@...>
Date: 21/08/2019 00:55 (GMT+00:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel Mango Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Can anyone tell me the correct location to store the Emergency tiller and rudder post extension on an Amel Mango?

The storage locations for all the other specialty parts on the boat make sense... but I cannot seem to find where the emergency tiller (180cm+ long) should be stored. When I took possession of my boat the emergency tiller was loose in the port cockpit lazarette. I just can't bring myself to think this is how the factory intended it to be stored.

I have read the posts regarding emergency tiller storage on the SM's. The emergency tiller arm on is too long to fit in the cabinets behind the pilot berth. The only location I have not eliminated is the bilge directly in front of the salon settee.

Did I miss something? Does anyone remember the factory storage location for the emergency tiller and supporting hardware?

Thank you,

Charles
SV Saturn
Amel Mango


Re: Forward Looking Sonar

Scott SV Tengah
 

We have the Interphase forward looking sonar on our A54 and use it often. It's not perfect, but definitely useful.

As Ken noted, we often use it to scope out the surrounding depths to account for any swinging. And more than once it has showed us that the charts aren't perfect and given us time to go astern hard to avoid a collision with an uncharted obstacle.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Always check your contractors' work

Scott SV Tengah
 

Ah ok, I have not had experience with the refrigeration group.

Good thing you guys didn't take what they said at face value! That said, I still believe having Amel's office nearby is invaluable so my vote is still for Le Marin. 

The electricians in Southern Spain were nice guys so I am a bit loathe to hang them out to dry. But given how much additional time and money I have wasted due to their shoddy work, I've realized that it's more important to me that no fellow Amel owner has to go through what I did.

The group was Electrical Marine Services in Gibraltar. An English guy and a South African. Initially I was very happy with their work as they actually showed up on time or at all, unlike some of the other contractors we hired. They got the work done on time, unlike the other contractors.  As time passed and problems with their work surfaced, my opinion of them changed.

The primary "other" contractor was MH Preserve at Alcaidesa Marina. They were overwhelmed and understaffed for the quantity of work we had them do - keep in mind this is right when we bought the boat. They came recommended by a surveyor but I surmise they were buddies. Anyways it's run by an English guy and his father does a lot of the work. With that (reverse?) nepotism, the father was unfireable and the work quality and pace reflected that. Additionally the marina makes it very expensive to bring in outside contractors, so you're stuck with them. 

The only reason we were able to leave was because my visa was running out. Otherwise we'd probably still be there today!


-- Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Forward Looking Sonar

Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

And one more thing... "it only sees a little over a boat length"
This statement is completely false..... Maybe this is true in 4
meters, but in 4 meters (2 meter under your keel) you should not be
moving very fast, maybe 1 knot or so unless you have local knowledge.
I have found the EchoPilot a big help and I can see in front of the
boat about 20 meters in this situation... But, in 10 meters, where
you usually drop your anchor you can see out at least 40 to 50 meters,
and in 40 meters you can see a wall coming at you 70 meters or more
before you hit it, giving you plenty of room to slow down if moving 6
kts. And, yes, this did happen to me, because you can't always trust
your charts. Case in point here in Indonesia; Google overlays are a
MUST here anytime you're in less that 100 meters.

But, the statement that you have to weave to see the whole picture of
what is in front of you this is very true, and sometimes you will see
Aquarius doing a circle before dropping the anchor just so I can see
what is around. And, my echoPilot will show me what the bottom of the
anchorage looks like which is very helpful in getting the anchor set
just the way I like it.

I am not a sales person for EchoPilot, but have used one for the past
2.5 years, and I love it. We use it every time we anchor, or moving
through water less than 50 meters unless we know the area well. Which
we rarely do because we are halfway through a one way trip around the
world.

I don't want to seem mean, but when I see a patently false statement,
or a statement that is misleading I have to say something.

Ken Powers
Aquarius
Currently in Indonesia

On 8/20/19, karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I had the EchoPilot 2-D on my boat when purchased 10 years ago. I found it
of little use because it only sees a little over a boat length ahead when
you really need it in water less than 4M deep. In muddy water if you are
looking for a channel, it only sees directly in front of the boat. You have
to turn the boat in hopes if identifying deeper water. I was rarely
successful, and was as likely to stumble on the channel as find it with the
sonar.
The transducer has since failed. I’m waiting until the 3D units get better
and cheaper before I replace it.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SN243

On Aug 20, 2019, at 11:34 AM, Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
<oliver.henrichsen@...> wrote:

Hi Scott,

To place the charger in the engineroom has some downsides:
- hunidity
- heat
- limited space so probably the charger is mounted sideways what lowers
airflow.
- long wires

I customized widened the switch area and drilled ventilation holes to the
alley.
I install 120mm thermocontrolled fans with heat alarms to blow fresh air
into the cabinet.

The 120A5000W fits vertical.

The lifepo is smaller than batteries before with same capacity so i could
install a new separation.

The starter batt is now behind the onan in the engine room.

No more dirty lead in the cabin. Hydrogen Should not be an issue as most
other yachts place the starter batt around the engine room.

Oliver from Vela Nautica

A54#39

Portugal

Sent from my Huawei Mobile


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel is going lithium
From: Scott SV Tengah
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
CC:


I guess this is a reminder that I still owe the group my writeup. :)

Oliver, how do you vent the compartment where you've installed the Victron
24/5000/120 inverter/charger? I mounted mine in the engine compartment
(connected with the recommended 2x pair of 50mm2 wires - not 95mm2 as I
previously mentioned) in the same location as the old Dolphin 100amp
charger, with the same ventilation from outside as the original Amel setup.


Even then, the charger/inverter gets damn hot especially when we are cooking
and the induction, microwave and boiler are drawing tons of current. Or when
it's charging at the full 120 amps.

Part of the reason I ask is that the electricians installed the Victron
150/35 MPPT in the same compartment where you installed your
charger/inverter (where the main battery switches are) and I'm getting very
high temperatures in that closed compartment after a full day's charging. If
you've figured out a good cooling solution, I'd rather implement that than
try to move my MPPT!

I was considering adding a little timer controlled 24v fan on the vent in
the battery compartment and connecting the two compartments, but haven't for
two reasons: (1) Amel kept the two compartments isolated. I am loathe to
violate that as they probably did that for a reason (2) The fan is just
another part to fail and I have enough things to keep up with already!


--
Scott
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com




Re: Always check your contractors' work

Scott SV Tengah
 

Kent,

The electricians connected the MPPT positive output to one of the battery positives, the one in the series pair where the positive terminal was not connected to the main 24v post. I guess this is why this battery got preferentially charged.

I haven't thought through putting it on the load side yet, just remembered that comment and made a note to research further. I do agree that putting it on the load side would mean that you'd have to leave the main switches on for the solar to charge the batteries. Perhaps my boat is wired "wrong" by a previous owner but from my first day of ownership, the bilge pump goes through the main switch. If I turn off the main switches, the bilge pump won't run. I'm too afraid to leave the boat without the bilge pump powered lest Murphy comes and smacks me upside the head. So in effect, the main switch is almost never turned off and is really only for emergencies.


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Amel Mango Emergency Tiller Storage Location

svcharisma
 

The emergency tiller is in the pilot berth area on top of the fuel tank, not in the cabinets above.  

Alan
sv Charisma
Mango #62


Re: Always check your contractors' work

Chuck_Kim_Joy
 

Greetings All. 
Ken speaks the truth. We have engaged the 6.3 ft guy who rides his bike briskly up and down the dock but whose name escapes me. Our thermostat in the main salon quit working. He told me the company that makes the analog units was out of business and only digital thermostats were available. Here's the rub. Our units age made it incompatible with the new thermostat so a whole new unit was required. BS. Coastal climate out of Annapolis to the rescue again. Plenty of analog thermos. Still making them and that was the fix. 

Chuck 
Joy #388
Summer in SLC Utah Beeeutiful!

On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 6:04 PM Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote:
Not all Caraibe's are the same.  I had my standing rigging replaced by
Caraibe, and I still think that they did a very good job.  But, the
Caraibe Refrigeration guys were idiots.  They told me that my aft
Climma Air-conditioning Unit "Had to be REPLACED!!".  I told them that
it was the Switch, not the unit.  The owner of Caraibe Refrigeration
got so upset he started screaming, and this guy is a 6' 3"..  In his
rage he sad, IF YOU DON'T WANT TO PAY, GO BACK TO YOUR BOAT".  Yes,
this was all in French, and I don't speak French.... But JP, the
previous owner of Aquarius was with me for translation, and JP looked
at me and told me what he said...  So, we just turned and walked away
from him..  And I never paid the bill for them to recharge the two
forward aircon units.  O' and I did have the switch replaced later,
and the Climma aircon can still freeze the aft cabin.

I think we all NEED to tell the other owners who did a good job, and
who didn't.  Name names, if workers do a good job, or bad!  We all
need to know.  If there is an owner that had a good experience with
Caraibe Refrigeration, they can speak for themselves.  But if you told
me that ...  "O, the Caraibe guys replaced my old Climma unit and the
new Unit is working great,"  I would say "you just got ripped off, and
your old Climma unit is probably installed in another boat working
just fine!"

Ken Powers
Aquarius
Currently in Indonesia


On 8/20/19, Scott SV Tengah <sv.tengah@...> wrote:
> Kent,
>
> I know it's Martinique, but I have had good experience with Caraibe Marine
> in Le Marin. They generally know Amels quite well. I had them redo my
> standing rigging and while all was not perfect, they fixed the problems
> without so much as a complaint. They really take pride in their work. I
> still had to double check everything but found far fewer problems than with
> other contractors.
>
> They do almost everything through their different "divisions" and while
> there's an argument that a monopoly is not good, having everything under the
> Caraibe umbrella means they can't point fingers at other contractors when
> something goes wrong.
>
> They have a decent relationship with and are very close to the Amel office
> down there. The Amel guys are very busy and don't do everything, but will
> gladly give technical advice to Caraibe Marine. The Amel guys aren't perfect
> at English so it's good that everyone is French. :)
>
> Let's just say I am literally sailing all the way back to Martinique for a
> few more items before heading through the Canal.
> --
> Scott
> 2007 A54 #69
> SV Tengah
> http://www.svtengah.com
>
>
>
>




Re: Forward Looking Sonar

Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

I think the EchoPilot 2D is AWESOME. Great performance for a
reasonable price. Yes, You can say, "O in a particular situation it
didn't work for me, so for that reason I'm going to wait til the price
to come down on the next best thing.... BUT, that's like saying "I
aint going to buy a VHF radio until I can get one for a dollar that
has a range of 50 miles." If you're leaving on a circumnavigation
now, in my opinion, you need a forward looking sonar on your boat...
And, if I would own an insurance company, I wouldn't insure a boat
sailing without a forward looking sonar. Yes, 3D would be better,
but 2 D can save your boat... AND YES EchoPilot 2D did help Aquarius
from hitting the reef in French Poly.

Ken Powers
Aquarius
Currently in Indonesia

On 8/20/19, karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I had the EchoPilot 2-D on my boat when purchased 10 years ago. I found it
of little use because it only sees a little over a boat length ahead when
you really need it in water less than 4M deep. In muddy water if you are
looking for a channel, it only sees directly in front of the boat. You have
to turn the boat in hopes if identifying deeper water. I was rarely
successful, and was as likely to stumble on the channel as find it with the
sonar.
The transducer has since failed. I’m waiting until the 3D units get better
and cheaper before I replace it.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SN243

On Aug 20, 2019, at 11:34 AM, Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
<oliver.henrichsen@...> wrote:

Hi Scott,

To place the charger in the engineroom has some downsides:
- hunidity
- heat
- limited space so probably the charger is mounted sideways what lowers
airflow.
- long wires

I customized widened the switch area and drilled ventilation holes to the
alley.
I install 120mm thermocontrolled fans with heat alarms to blow fresh air
into the cabinet.

The 120A5000W fits vertical.

The lifepo is smaller than batteries before with same capacity so i could
install a new separation.

The starter batt is now behind the onan in the engine room.

No more dirty lead in the cabin. Hydrogen Should not be an issue as most
other yachts place the starter batt around the engine room.

Oliver from Vela Nautica

A54#39

Portugal

Sent from my Huawei Mobile


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel is going lithium
From: Scott SV Tengah
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
CC:


I guess this is a reminder that I still owe the group my writeup. :)

Oliver, how do you vent the compartment where you've installed the Victron
24/5000/120 inverter/charger? I mounted mine in the engine compartment
(connected with the recommended 2x pair of 50mm2 wires - not 95mm2 as I
previously mentioned) in the same location as the old Dolphin 100amp
charger, with the same ventilation from outside as the original Amel setup.


Even then, the charger/inverter gets damn hot especially when we are cooking
and the induction, microwave and boiler are drawing tons of current. Or when
it's charging at the full 120 amps.

Part of the reason I ask is that the electricians installed the Victron
150/35 MPPT in the same compartment where you installed your
charger/inverter (where the main battery switches are) and I'm getting very
high temperatures in that closed compartment after a full day's charging. If
you've figured out a good cooling solution, I'd rather implement that than
try to move my MPPT!

I was considering adding a little timer controlled 24v fan on the vent in
the battery compartment and connecting the two compartments, but haven't for
two reasons: (1) Amel kept the two compartments isolated. I am loathe to
violate that as they probably did that for a reason (2) The fan is just
another part to fail and I have enough things to keep up with already!


--
Scott
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com




Re: Always check your contractors' work

Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

Not all Caraibe's are the same. I had my standing rigging replaced by
Caraibe, and I still think that they did a very good job. But, the
Caraibe Refrigeration guys were idiots. They told me that my aft
Climma Air-conditioning Unit "Had to be REPLACED!!". I told them that
it was the Switch, not the unit. The owner of Caraibe Refrigeration
got so upset he started screaming, and this guy is a 6' 3".. In his
rage he sad, IF YOU DON'T WANT TO PAY, GO BACK TO YOUR BOAT". Yes,
this was all in French, and I don't speak French.... But JP, the
previous owner of Aquarius was with me for translation, and JP looked
at me and told me what he said... So, we just turned and walked away
from him.. And I never paid the bill for them to recharge the two
forward aircon units. O' and I did have the switch replaced later,
and the Climma aircon can still freeze the aft cabin.

I think we all NEED to tell the other owners who did a good job, and
who didn't. Name names, if workers do a good job, or bad! We all
need to know. If there is an owner that had a good experience with
Caraibe Refrigeration, they can speak for themselves. But if you told
me that ... "O, the Caraibe guys replaced my old Climma unit and the
new Unit is working great," I would say "you just got ripped off, and
your old Climma unit is probably installed in another boat working
just fine!"

Ken Powers
Aquarius
Currently in Indonesia

On 8/20/19, Scott SV Tengah <sv.tengah@...> wrote:
Kent,

I know it's Martinique, but I have had good experience with Caraibe Marine
in Le Marin. They generally know Amels quite well. I had them redo my
standing rigging and while all was not perfect, they fixed the problems
without so much as a complaint. They really take pride in their work. I
still had to double check everything but found far fewer problems than with
other contractors.

They do almost everything through their different "divisions" and while
there's an argument that a monopoly is not good, having everything under the
Caraibe umbrella means they can't point fingers at other contractors when
something goes wrong.

They have a decent relationship with and are very close to the Amel office
down there. The Amel guys are very busy and don't do everything, but will
gladly give technical advice to Caraibe Marine. The Amel guys aren't perfect
at English so it's good that everyone is French. :)

Let's just say I am literally sailing all the way back to Martinique for a
few more items before heading through the Canal.
--
Scott
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com




Amel Mango Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Charles Bell
 

Can anyone tell me the correct location to store the Emergency tiller and rudder post extension on an Amel Mango?

The storage locations for all the other specialty parts on the boat make sense... but I cannot seem to find where the emergency tiller (180cm+ long) should be stored. When I took possession of my boat the emergency tiller was loose in the port cockpit lazarette. I just can't bring myself to think this is how the factory intended it to be stored.

I have read the posts regarding emergency tiller storage on the SM's. The emergency tiller arm on is too long to fit in the cabinets behind the pilot berth. The only location I have not eliminated is the bilge directly in front of the salon settee.

Did I miss something? Does anyone remember the factory storage location for the emergency tiller and supporting hardware?

Thank you,

Charles
SV Saturn
Amel Mango


Amel Mango Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Charles Bell
 

Can anyone tell me the correct location to store the Emergency tiller and rudder post extension on an Amel Mango?

The storage locations for all the other specialty parts on the boat make sense... but I cannot seem to find where the emergency tiller (180cm+ long) should be stored. When I took possession of my boat the emergency tiller was loose in the port cockpit lazarette. I just can't bring myself to think this is how the factory intended it to be stored.

I have read the posts regarding emergency tiller storage on the SM's. The emergency tiller arm on is too long to fit in the cabinets behind the pilot berth. The only location I have not eliminated is the bilge directly in front of the salon settee.

Did I miss something? Does anyone remember the factory storage location for the emergency tiller and supporting hardware?

Thank you,

Charles
SV Saturn
Amel Mango


Re: Always check your contractors' work

 

Scott,

All of the chargers on your Amel 54 are connected to the battery side of the Main Switch by Amel. It stands to reason that the output of the MPPT would also connect the the battery side of the Main Switch. BTW, it is important to connect the Negative output of the MPPT at least several feet from the shunt, otherwise the battery monitor readings are distorted. Regrettably, I have seen MPPT output connected to a single pair of batteries, but I have never seen anyone wire to a single battery as you stated...did you mean a single pair?

For some reason, unknown to me, the 110 amp 24 volt alternator is connected to the house side of the Main Switch. I really wish someone could tell me why.

It is a huge problem when workers respond with I have been "doing this for years" because regrettably they have years of experience doing it the wrong way and will never change.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 3:25 PM karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
 Hmmm, I still don’t quite follow your explanation, Scott.
  If you have big enough cables from the batteries to the main 24V posts (ie no resistance at high amps), connecting at the post or the battery shouldn’t make any difference.  If they connected to one of the batteries in a series pair that is NOT connected to the main 24v post,  then the charge would almost certainly go to that battery preferentially.  If the cables are not big enough to give zero resistance, the charge would go preferentially to the closest battery.

If you mean that the + output cable from the MPPPs should be on the boat (load) side of the main battery switch, you would have to leave the switch “on” (“Marche”) to charge the batteries.  On Kristy with Victron Skylla-i Charger and wet cell lead acid batteries the output is to the + and - posts where all for pairs of batteries are connected in parallel.  The 3 MPPPs for the three pairs of solar panels are likewise connected to the same posts.  I can turn off the battery switch and still let the solar panels charge when I’m away from the boat.  The output can be monitored on remote panels, or by using the Bluetooth dongle on the MPPPs, but cannot be monitored with the primary 24V monitor which is on the boat side of the switch.  It’s not ideal because the four pairs are not completely balance-charged, but correcting that seems a lot more complicated.  So far this is working well for me.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243

On Aug 20, 2019, at 2:42 PM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

I learned this through monitoring my batteries. 

The electrician connected the positive lead from the MPPT to the positive post of ONE of the batteries. His thought was that it would be like a bunch of interconnected cups. Once this first battery one got some charge, it would overflow the current into the next battery and so forth. I am no electrician so it sort of made sense at the time.

Well, monitoring showed me that this does not actually occur. The Battery1 that was directly connected to the MPPT was always higher voltage than the rest. The further away from the MPPT-Battery1 connection, the lower the voltage. The entire bank was being actively imbalanced!

Now I have the positive attached to the post where all the battery positives join. The batteries have remained balanced over the past year.

I can't remember where I read it, but a marine electrician stated that "in case it wasn't obvious, you connect the MPPT output to the load." I don't quite have it perfect as it's where all the batteries join, but I'm going to relocate the MPPT anyways, so I'll connect it to the load then.

Sorry, if my explanation isn't precise enough as I never studied engineering. Just lots of reading, lots of testing and lots of monitoring.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Always check your contractors' work

karkauai
 

 Hmmm, I still don’t quite follow your explanation, Scott.
  If you have big enough cables from the batteries to the main 24V posts (ie no resistance at high amps), connecting at the post or the battery shouldn’t make any difference.  If they connected to one of the batteries in a series pair that is NOT connected to the main 24v post,  then the charge would almost certainly go to that battery preferentially.  If the cables are not big enough to give zero resistance, the charge would go preferentially to the closest battery.

If you mean that the + output cable from the MPPPs should be on the boat (load) side of the main battery switch, you would have to leave the switch “on” (“Marche”) to charge the batteries.  On Kristy with Victron Skylla-i Charger and wet cell lead acid batteries the output is to the + and - posts where all for pairs of batteries are connected in parallel.  The 3 MPPPs for the three pairs of solar panels are likewise connected to the same posts.  I can turn off the battery switch and still let the solar panels charge when I’m away from the boat.  The output can be monitored on remote panels, or by using the Bluetooth dongle on the MPPPs, but cannot be monitored with the primary 24V monitor which is on the boat side of the switch.  It’s not ideal because the four pairs are not completely balance-charged, but correcting that seems a lot more complicated.  So far this is working well for me.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243

On Aug 20, 2019, at 2:42 PM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

I learned this through monitoring my batteries. 

The electrician connected the positive lead from the MPPT to the positive post of ONE of the batteries. His thought was that it would be like a bunch of interconnected cups. Once this first battery one got some charge, it would overflow the current into the next battery and so forth. I am no electrician so it sort of made sense at the time.

Well, monitoring showed me that this does not actually occur. The Battery1 that was directly connected to the MPPT was always higher voltage than the rest. The further away from the MPPT-Battery1 connection, the lower the voltage. The entire bank was being actively imbalanced!

Now I have the positive attached to the post where all the battery positives join. The batteries have remained balanced over the past year.

I can't remember where I read it, but a marine electrician stated that "in case it wasn't obvious, you connect the MPPT output to the load." I don't quite have it perfect as it's where all the batteries join, but I'm going to relocate the MPPT anyways, so I'll connect it to the load then.

Sorry, if my explanation isn't precise enough as I never studied engineering. Just lots of reading, lots of testing and lots of monitoring.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: 100M of 10mm rated stainless steel anchor ‘AMEL’

jlm@jlmertz.fr
 

Hello Paul

Can you contact me 33 (0)663 393 174

Merci

JLMERTZ

on CottonBay


Le 20/08/2019 à 18:54, Paul Brown a écrit :
hello all,

I am up grading my chain to a higher strength rating for storm anchoring and have 100M of Rated stainless steel 10mm chain, which was supplied with the delivery of my A55#17 when she was launched early 2013. The chain is in excellent condition from my inspection and has not been extensively used as we have sail perhaps no more than 3000NM

if you would like to make an offer please contact me by email feeder.brown@...

We are sailing south of France to Sicily till October 


or reply to this thread 

regards Paul Fortuna II 55#17



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Rocna 40 kg for sale, Euro 500

Joerg Esdorn
 

New is 1200 plus, never used, kept as a spare since new in 2016.  Located in Almerimar, Costa del Sol, until August 26.  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 Kincsem


Re: Always check your contractors' work

Scott SV Tengah
 
Edited

I learned this through monitoring my batteries. 

The electrician connected the positive lead from the MPPT to the positive post of ONE of the batteries. His thought was that it would be like a bunch of interconnected cups. Once this first battery one got some charge, it would overflow the current into the next battery and so forth. I am no electrician so it sort of made sense at the time.

Well, monitoring showed me that this does not actually occur. The Battery1 that was directly connected to the MPPT was always higher voltage than the rest. The further away from the MPPT-Battery1 connection, the lower the voltage. The entire bank was being actively imbalanced!

Now I have the positive attached to the post where all the battery positives join. The batteries have remained balanced over the past year.

I can't remember where I read it, but a marine electrician stated that "in case it wasn't obvious, you connect the MPPT output to the load." I don't quite have it perfect as it's where all the batteries join, but I'm going to relocate the MPPT anyways, so I'll connect it to the load then.

Sorry, if my explanation isn't precise enough as I never studied engineering. Just lots of reading, lots of testing and lots of monitoring.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com