Date   

Re: Storm tactics

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Kent,
I agree with you. Done the same myself, both the reduction in sail as a windy thunderstorm approaches and the heaving to, although not for 48 hours. However 8 to 12 ft seas is one thing, oceanic monsters is another altogether and would need evaluation as to tactic. The ability to furl and unfurl sail rapidly is one of the many beauties of the Amel
Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

On 24 July 2019 at 14:59 "karkauai via Groups.Io" <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hi Mike,

We got caught in a slow moving front last spring with 35-40kts with gusts over 45 from the N (where we wanted to go). We didn’t want to run S with the storm and lose a lot of ground, and tacking into 8-12 ft seas didn’t seem like much fun (and probably wouldn’t have gotten us very far N). We hove to for almost 48 hours with a small handkerchief of jib and about 1/2 of the mizzen, drifting directly downwind. The slick we created to windward calmed any breakers (only one small breaker slapped the boat in all that time), the motion was benign, and we lost only 50 miles in two days.

In thunderstorms with high winds, I reduce sail as the storm approaches, and if there is room, I keep the wind on the aft quarter until it abates. It often changes direction continuously as the storm passes, it can take an hour or more until the prevailing winds return.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy


On Jul 23, 2019, at 10:28 PM, Mike Ondra via Groups.Io <mdondra=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

During our recent passage from Boston to the Chesapeake Bay we experienced two severe thunderstorms. In one winds reached 40 kn sustained with gusts to 55 kn for about 10 minutes at the severest. Fortunately the storms were relatively short duration and the seas were confused not having had a chance to organize and build significantly. Our tactic was to motor into the wind with bare poles. At 40+ knots even at full throttle we could barely maintain rudder control as we made way at around 2+/- knots: The wind would push the bow 20 to 30° off course before recovery under autopilot. We did not try hand steering as the auto pilot was doing an OK job in general. It’s seems that in any greater amount of wind or with a more significantly organized sea this tactic would have put us broadside to the wind and waves and then who knows what?
Drouges and see anchors make a lot of sense for longer duration storms. Thoughts on storm tactics for short duration events such as this?
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM 240
Rock Hall, MD









Re: Water maker Questions

Gary Silver
 

Hi Tom and All:

A few notes on desalination of seawater and my experience with my Dessalator 160 l/hr over the last 18 years of use:
 
For the following reason I measure EC (electrical conductivity)  not TDS for measuring my product water;

"EC stands for Electrical Conductivity and is measured micro-siemens per centimeter. TDS stands for Total Dissolved Solids and is measured in PPM or parts per million. TDS is acquired by taking the EC value and performing a calculation to determine the TDS value. Because TDS is actually a calculation it is really only a guess at what the nutrient concentration is. On top of that, there are three different conversion factors to determine TDS and different manufacturers use different conversion factors. In other words you could test the same solution with two different meters and get two totally different readings. But the EC is read the same by all meters the only difference is the conversion factor."

I take this to mean the EC is a primary measurement whereas TDS is a secondary calculated value (based on a formula).  That said, TDS meters are probably "pretty close".  I love the quote from the WHO that shows that there isn't a hard and fast number for TDS, it is a range and various palates will taste water in different ways. 

My experience : Water makers love to be used.  Lack of use is probably the most common cause of membrane failure.  Frequent (daily or every other day) use will prolong their life.  

I have never quite understood why operation in brackish water is damaging but I have heard that opinion often enough to believe that it is so. 

Since I monitor EC continuously I can speak to the trends associated with water maker use: 

1. Upon startup of my 160l/hr Dessalator water maker, the EC will start about where it left off when it was shut down (usually about 400 microSeimens/cm), this is due to the last produced product water being at the EC sensor,
2.  Within seconds the ED will rise to over 2,000 microsiemens (max recording range of my EC monitor), I have speculated on why this rises (osmosis vs reverse-osmosis taking place within the membrane capsule during the shut down period)
3.  Then over a period of about 2 minutes it will gradually fall to about 600 mS, at which point I will start to "Save" the product water.  I have a manual "Save / Discard" switch and utilize that to determine when to save product water.
4.  Then EC will fall continuously during production (the longer the water maker runs the lower it goes).    
5.  The higher the pressure that I run the water maker (up to 65 Bar, top of the green), the lower the EC / better the EC.  At bottom of the green the EC will usually be about 50-100 microSiemens/cm higher than when run at the top of the green.  

You do no favors to your water maker or product water by running it below the green arc.  I routinely run my membranes at 65 bar and I am only only my 3rd set of membranes in 18 years (NOTE: I use my boat only 3 months out of the year and have a automatic timer that flushes the membranes with carbon block filtered product water for 2 minutes every 48 hrs when I am not aboard the boat, so my experience probably isn't typical for a cruising sailboat).

So many good questions around the water maker.   Can't speak to "cleaning" the members as I have never found the need to do that. 

One last point: don't use sodium metabisulate to pickle your water maker unless you absolutely have no other option.  If you do use it, only use it at the lowest possible effect concentration and for the shortest period of time possible.  It is corrosive and can damage metal parts in you water maker (hence the reason I have a fresh water flush system and haven't pickled in in 13 years).

All the best to my fellow Amel owners who, like me, are on a never ending journey of learning.

Gary S. Silver, M.D.
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000  Hull #335
On the hard at Puerto Del Rey Marina, Puerto Rico


Re: Water maker Questions

Ryan Meador
 

Hi Tom,

Great meeting you last week.  I believe we have the same watermaker you do (Iteration is hull 233).  We see almost exactly the same production rate that you do.  I believe we see similar TDS as well, but we do not have a meter; I think the folks in Martinique told me it was about 250 when they rebuilt it last winter.  We were instructed to run it at 55-60 bar, despite the green zone on the gauge being from 60-65 bar.  They said it shortens the membrane life to run it at higher pressure.

While we're on the subject, I saw this article just a few days ago about how the neighboring town of Cambridge, MA has a TDS of 469 in their public water supply!

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Tue, Jul 23, 2019 at 6:34 PM Craig Briggs via Groups.Io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Bill et al,
World Health Organization to the rescue; but anything <500 ppm is good.
"TDS is a measure of Total Dissolved Solids in Water which comprise of inorganic salts, principally calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, bicarbonates, chlorides and sulfates, and small amounts of organic matter that are dissolved in water. TDS in drinking-water originates from natural sources, sewage, urban runoff, and industrial wastewater. Concentrations of TDS in water vary considerably in different geological regions owing to differences in the solubility of minerals.

According to WHO report on Drinking water standards, NO health-based guideline value is proposed for TDS in Drinking Water which essentially means that human body can ingest any amount of TDS in water without any health impact. Now the question is …Why high TDS is considered bad in Drinking Water?

The simple reason is the palatability or taste! Yes, you heard it right. High levels of TDS in drinking-water may have a certain objectionable taste because of salts. The palatability of water with a TDS level of less than 600 mg/liter is generally considered to be good; drinking-water becomes significantly unpalatable at TDS levels greater than 1200 mg/liter. Also, TDS may be high because of certain chemicals which are harmful and hence purification is required to eradicate them. However, this is not a concern in naturally available water. Thus, we can drink the water of any TDS level if it is devoid of harmful pathogens, chemical, and other unacceptable impurities.Hence…high TDS does not lead to any health problem. The presence of high levels of TDS may also be objectionable because of excessive scaling in water pipes, heaters, boilers, and household appliances.

Alternatively, water with extremely low concentrations of TDS may also be unacceptable because of its flat, insipid taste.Most purification techniques such as filtration, membrane processing or sedimentation aim to eliminate the impurities that form high TDS. Water is treated or purified to maintain palatability as well as purity in terms of microbial and chemical composition. It has nothing to do with TDS or mineral content. Purifiers in the market with TDS modulator or a Mineral Booster are just for marketing promotion for naïve customers and do not have any rationale behind it.

To know more about TDS in drinking water, go through the following research published by WHO.WHO Guidelines for drinking-water quality -2008

http://www.who.int/water_sanitat...


Re: Dyneema loop

Wolfgang Weber
 

Thank you very much Wolfgang Weber SY Elise 
Great Video, I will try it


Re: Dyneema loop

Annsofie & Jonas Svanberg
 

Cheaper to make them your self. Super easy task.

https://youtu.be/j5CZzAo0IxE

Hälsningar/Regards/Cumprementos
Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila SM232, 1998


Skickat från min iPhone

24 juli 2019 kl. 09:38 skrev Wolfgang Weber via Groups.Io <webercardio@...>:

Hello to the group,
I would like to renew the dyneema loops of the rigg.Before order at Amel, I would ask for any recommendations.
Our Amel is from 2011 , 20.000 sm.
Wolfgang Weber SY Elise Amel 54 #162 (Annapolis) back on boat 2nd of August


Dyneema loop

Wolfgang Weber
 

Hello to the group,
I would like to renew the dyneema loops of the rigg.Before order at Amel, I would ask for any recommendations.
Our Amel is from 2011 , 20.000 sm.
Wolfgang Weber SY Elise Amel 54 #162 (Annapolis) back on boat 2nd of August


Re: Storm tactics

James Alton
 

Mike,

    One thing that might be helpful is to know that if the wind is too strong to motor directly upwind that you can still make progress to windward without stressing your engine.  You can do this without using any sails by tacking or if you cannot easily bring the bow through the wind by jibing your way to windward.  Set your engine to a comfortable power level and then find an angle to the wind where your boat speed is high enough for the keel to effeciently generate lift and you will have almost no leeway.  I once had to use this technique in winds of 50 plus knots on a non Amel boat I owned previously to gain distance to windward to enter an inlet during a crazy strong Northeaster.  There was not nearly enough power available to bring the bow through but jibing was easy and despite some big seas we gained the distance to windward that we needed to safely enter the inlet.

Best,
James
SV Sueno
Mara u #220



Sent from Samsung tablet.

-------- Original message --------
From: "ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io" <ngtnewington@...>
Date: 7/24/19 7:14 AM (GMT+01:00)
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Storm tactics

Mike,
Heave to under small amount of mizzen or main and scrap of jib backwinded. Lash helm such that the boat sits at about 50 degrees from the wind. She should for-reach at about 2-5 knots.
Then have a cup of tea, relax and assess. You will be amazed at how comfy this is. You should practice the tactic in 25 kn.
I have used this tactic in many situations on various boats. On one occasion for 48 hours on passage to New Zealand from Tonga in 1991.
I also use it when I want to slow down for a day light entry and sometimes if it is rough to just make a good meal and take it easy.

In general I believe one should always keep sailing until the wind really gets out of hand. That is until you can no longer heave to, I mean that the boat can not set any sail at all. At which point there are various options:
1. Running with it under bare poles. This works but you need sea room and if it is in generally the right direction makes sense. If not then:
a. Jordan series rogue
b. Lie with no sails and leave the boat to it. This is pretty horrible and can be dangerous in big seas but for example after the Fastnet race of 1979 there were many abandoned boats floating undamaged when the storm passed.
Nick
Amelia AML 54-019 in Preveza Greece.
> On 24 Jul 2019, at 05:28, Mike Ondra via Groups.Io <mdondra@...> wrote:
>
> During our recent passage from Boston to the Chesapeake Bay we experienced two severe thunderstorms. In one winds reached 40 kn sustained with gusts to 55 kn for about 10 minutes at the severest. Fortunately the storms were relatively short duration and the seas were confused  not having had a chance to organize and build significantly. Our tactic was to motor into the wind with bare poles. At 40+ knots even at full throttle we could barely maintain rudder control as we made way at around 2+/- knots: The wind would push the bow 20 to 30° off course before recovery under autopilot. We did not try hand steering as the auto pilot was doing an OK job in general. It’s seems that in any greater amount of wind or with a more significantly organized sea this tactic would have put us broadside to the wind and waves and then who knows what?
> Drouges and see anchors make a lot of sense for longer duration storms.  Thoughts on storm tactics for short duration events such as this?
> Mike Ondra
> Aletes SM 240
> Rock Hall, MD
>
>
>
>
>





Re: Storm tactics

ngtnewington Newington
 

Mike,
Heave to under small amount of mizzen or main and scrap of jib backwinded. Lash helm such that the boat sits at about 50 degrees from the wind. She should for-reach at about 2-5 knots.
Then have a cup of tea, relax and assess. You will be amazed at how comfy this is. You should practice the tactic in 25 kn.
I have used this tactic in many situations on various boats. On one occasion for 48 hours on passage to New Zealand from Tonga in 1991.
I also use it when I want to slow down for a day light entry and sometimes if it is rough to just make a good meal and take it easy.

In general I believe one should always keep sailing until the wind really gets out of hand. That is until you can no longer heave to, I mean that the boat can not set any sail at all. At which point there are various options:
1. Running with it under bare poles. This works but you need sea room and if it is in generally the right direction makes sense. If not then:
a. Jordan series rogue
b. Lie with no sails and leave the boat to it. This is pretty horrible and can be dangerous in big seas but for example after the Fastnet race of 1979 there were many abandoned boats floating undamaged when the storm passed.
Nick
Amelia AML 54-019 in Preveza Greece.

On 24 Jul 2019, at 05:28, Mike Ondra via Groups.Io <mdondra=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

During our recent passage from Boston to the Chesapeake Bay we experienced two severe thunderstorms. In one winds reached 40 kn sustained with gusts to 55 kn for about 10 minutes at the severest. Fortunately the storms were relatively short duration and the seas were confused not having had a chance to organize and build significantly. Our tactic was to motor into the wind with bare poles. At 40+ knots even at full throttle we could barely maintain rudder control as we made way at around 2+/- knots: The wind would push the bow 20 to 30° off course before recovery under autopilot. We did not try hand steering as the auto pilot was doing an OK job in general. It’s seems that in any greater amount of wind or with a more significantly organized sea this tactic would have put us broadside to the wind and waves and then who knows what?
Drouges and see anchors make a lot of sense for longer duration storms. Thoughts on storm tactics for short duration events such as this?
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM 240
Rock Hall, MD





Re: Storm tactics

eric freedman
 

I don't leave home without the Ace Sailmakers Jordan series drogue.

We were in a Hurricane for 36 hours.
Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

http://www.oceannavigator.com/March-April-2011/Prepare-for-survival-conditions/

-----Original Message-----
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ondra via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 10:29 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Storm tactics

During our recent passage from Boston to the Chesapeake Bay we experienced two severe thunderstorms. In one winds reached 40 kn sustained with gusts to 55 kn for about 10 minutes at the severest. Fortunately the storms were relatively short duration and the seas were confused not having had a chance to organize and build significantly. Our tactic was to motor into the wind with bare poles. At 40+ knots even at full throttle we could barely maintain rudder control as we made way at around 2+/- knots: The wind would push the bow 20 to 30° off course before recovery under autopilot. We did not try hand steering as the auto pilot was doing an OK job in general. It’s seems that in any greater amount of wind or with a more significantly organized sea this tactic would have put us broadside to the wind and waves and then who knows what?
Drouges and see anchors make a lot of sense for longer duration storms. Thoughts on storm tactics for short duration events such as this?
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM 240
Rock Hall, MD


Re: Storm tactics

karkauai
 

Hi Mike,

We got caught in a slow moving front last spring with 35-40kts with gusts over 45 from the N (where we wanted to go). We didn’t want to run S with the storm and lose a lot of ground, and tacking into 8-12 ft seas didn’t seem like much fun (and probably wouldn’t have gotten us very far N). We hove to for almost 48 hours with a small handkerchief of jib and about 1/2 of the mizzen, drifting directly downwind. The slick we created to windward calmed any breakers (only one small breaker slapped the boat in all that time), the motion was benign, and we lost only 50 miles in two days.

In thunderstorms with high winds, I reduce sail as the storm approaches, and if there is room, I keep the wind on the aft quarter until it abates. It often changes direction continuously as the storm passes, it can take an hour or more until the prevailing winds return.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

On Jul 23, 2019, at 10:28 PM, Mike Ondra via Groups.Io <mdondra=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

During our recent passage from Boston to the Chesapeake Bay we experienced two severe thunderstorms. In one winds reached 40 kn sustained with gusts to 55 kn for about 10 minutes at the severest. Fortunately the storms were relatively short duration and the seas were confused not having had a chance to organize and build significantly. Our tactic was to motor into the wind with bare poles. At 40+ knots even at full throttle we could barely maintain rudder control as we made way at around 2+/- knots: The wind would push the bow 20 to 30° off course before recovery under autopilot. We did not try hand steering as the auto pilot was doing an OK job in general. It’s seems that in any greater amount of wind or with a more significantly organized sea this tactic would have put us broadside to the wind and waves and then who knows what?
Drouges and see anchors make a lot of sense for longer duration storms. Thoughts on storm tactics for short duration events such as this?
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM 240
Rock Hall, MD


Storm tactics

Mike Ondra
 

During our recent passage from Boston to the Chesapeake Bay we experienced two severe thunderstorms. In one winds reached 40 kn sustained with gusts to 55 kn for about 10 minutes at the severest. Fortunately the storms were relatively short duration and the seas were confused not having had a chance to organize and build significantly. Our tactic was to motor into the wind with bare poles. At 40+ knots even at full throttle we could barely maintain rudder control as we made way at around 2+/- knots: The wind would push the bow 20 to 30° off course before recovery under autopilot. We did not try hand steering as the auto pilot was doing an OK job in general. It’s seems that in any greater amount of wind or with a more significantly organized sea this tactic would have put us broadside to the wind and waves and then who knows what?
Drouges and see anchors make a lot of sense for longer duration storms. Thoughts on storm tactics for short duration events such as this?
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM 240
Rock Hall, MD


Re: Water maker Questions

Craig Briggs
 

Bill et al,
World Health Organization to the rescue; but anything <500 ppm is good.
"TDS is a measure of Total Dissolved Solids in Water which comprise of inorganic salts, principally calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, bicarbonates, chlorides and sulfates, and small amounts of organic matter that are dissolved in water. TDS in drinking-water originates from natural sources, sewage, urban runoff, and industrial wastewater. Concentrations of TDS in water vary considerably in different geological regions owing to differences in the solubility of minerals.

According to WHO report on Drinking water standards, NO health-based guideline value is proposed for TDS in Drinking Water which essentially means that human body can ingest any amount of TDS in water without any health impact. Now the question is …Why high TDS is considered bad in Drinking Water?

The simple reason is the palatability or taste! Yes, you heard it right. High levels of TDS in drinking-water may have a certain objectionable taste because of salts. The palatability of water with a TDS level of less than 600 mg/liter is generally considered to be good; drinking-water becomes significantly unpalatable at TDS levels greater than 1200 mg/liter. Also, TDS may be high because of certain chemicals which are harmful and hence purification is required to eradicate them. However, this is not a concern in naturally available water. Thus, we can drink the water of any TDS level if it is devoid of harmful pathogens, chemical, and other unacceptable impurities.Hence…high TDS does not lead to any health problem. The presence of high levels of TDS may also be objectionable because of excessive scaling in water pipes, heaters, boilers, and household appliances.

Alternatively, water with extremely low concentrations of TDS may also be unacceptable because of its flat, insipid taste.Most purification techniques such as filtration, membrane processing or sedimentation aim to eliminate the impurities that form high TDS. Water is treated or purified to maintain palatability as well as purity in terms of microbial and chemical composition. It has nothing to do with TDS or mineral content. Purifiers in the market with TDS modulator or a Mineral Booster are just for marketing promotion for naïve customers and do not have any rationale behind it.

To know more about TDS in drinking water, go through the following research published by WHO.WHO Guidelines for drinking-water quality -2008

http://www.who.int/water_sanitat...


Re: Dessslator HP hoses

Alan Grayson
 

Thanks Guys, I think i have found a shop who can do it. Thanks for the advice i did not even think about hydraulic shops as i would prefer food grade hoses.
Regards
Alan Grayson
SV Ora Pai


Re: Autoprop H6 Tools

Duane Siegfri
 

Gary (s/v Liahona),

Thank you for the advice, I'll take a good look at the lip seal issue you brought up.  Their parts list for the H6 has an "Ecopur Seal", which I take to be the lip seal.

Duane


Re: Dessslator HP hoses

eric freedman
 

Alan,

You can go to any hydraulic shop—they can make you up the hoses for  you.

They are usually rated at 4000 psi and have swaged on fittings. Probably for 50-60 dollars.

If I remember correctly the fittings are called JIC fittings.

I have been using these type of hoses for my stove, the hydraulic brake hose as a spare, and my watermaker. They do have drinking water quality hoses on special order , however I use regular hoses and my TDS meter always reads around 200.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

Here is the fitting in steel- granger  might have it in brass or ss.

 

https://www.grainger.com/product/2F513?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI3LnOwoLM4wIVjYzICh0irgnYEAQYBCABEgIxmvD_BwE&cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&ef_id=EAIaIQobChMI3LnOwoLM4wIVjYzICh0irgnYEAQYBCABEgIxmvD_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!284662588495!!!g!475511574427!

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan Grayson
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 11:47 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Dessslator HP hoses

 

Hi All, im about to order new HP hoses from the dessalator rep in the US. The end fittings are reusable and so you only need to buy the hose unless like me one of your ends are damaged.
There are 2 options for this.
1: buy the hose from France and any ends that you need. Hose $40 fittings $93.00 each, shipping $70
2: buy new hose and ends from the US. the hose is different and the fittings are slightly different with the same threaded ends. They are not interchangeable. Cost of 2 new hoses $472.00
I'm buying the hose and 1 end fitting from France.
If anyone else wants to buy either hoses or fittings from France and add to my order please let me know by Thurs 25th by noon eastern time. The order will be shipping to me in Annapolis and i'll forward from here if you pay shipping to your destination.
Regards
Alan Grayson
SV Ora Pai
Annapolis, MD


Re: 1986 Amel Maramu 46 Mainsail Furling Motors

 

"... if they would just give us the spec of the motor - or an equivalent..."  They don't do things that way, and Martinique is the wrong place to ask because they order all of the parts they sell from La Rochelle.

If you follow the instructions I gave you, you will get an answer, but since it will require them ordering a part for a 33 year old Amel, your request probably will not get the priority that another will get ordering a motor for a 15 year old Amel and that part is still stocked by Amel.

Note, that one part of the instructions I say, "In an emergency you can phone SAV at +33 (0) 546 55 00 75." Call them. French or English.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Tue, Jul 23, 2019 at 3:21 PM Samantha Jane Bartlett <bartlettsam@...> wrote:
Thanks Bill,

We have asked for a quote from both Amel in Martinique and SAV in France - my husband has spoken with them in French (he's French) and we are still getting no joy.  I understand it's a 33 year old boat but if they would just give us the spec of the motor - or an equivalent, we can work with it!  He's going to try and call again tomorrow to France... but this has been going on a long time now and we're no further forward.  Our old motors are just too rusty to get any info from!


Re: 1986 Amel Maramu 46 Mainsail Furling Motors

Bill Fletcher
 

Hi I own a 85 Maramu and have had to have these motors repaired. They may be rusty but a good DC motor rebuilder can usually get them working again. They are just a old 12Volt dc starter motor. The problem sounds like a stuck or warn out brush. I don’t know where you are but there is usually a rebuilder that can help you out. Good luck. 
Fair winds
Bill Fletcher 
Tahitian Dream 
Maramu 179

On Wed, Jul 24, 2019 at 8:21 AM Samantha Jane Bartlett <bartlettsam@...> wrote:
Thanks Bill,

We have asked for a quote from both Amel in Martinique and SAV in France - my husband has spoken with them in French (he's French) and we are still getting no joy.  I understand it's a 33 year old boat but if they would just give us the spec of the motor - or an equivalent, we can work with it!  He's going to try and call again tomorrow to France... but this has been going on a long time now and we're no further forward.  Our old motors are just too rusty to get any info from!


Re: 1986 Amel Maramu 46 Mainsail Furling Motors

Samantha Jane Bartlett
 

Thanks Bill,

We have asked for a quote from both Amel in Martinique and SAV in France - my husband has spoken with them in French (he's French) and we are still getting no joy.  I understand it's a 33 year old boat but if they would just give us the spec of the motor - or an equivalent, we can work with it!  He's going to try and call again tomorrow to France... but this has been going on a long time now and we're no further forward.  Our old motors are just too rusty to get any info from!


Re: Auto pilot for a Santorin 46

smiles bernard
 

Hi there

Just some thoughts related to reliance on the autopilot.

We bought our Maramu to sail short handed, long distance with young kids onboard and this led me to consider our reliance on a single autopilot.

The electric autopilot has been excellent but I did want a reliable plan B.

I looked into replicating the very nice SM dual autopilot system with the addition of a linear drive unit on the steering quadrant.

In the end, for true resilience (ACU, control head, rudder sensor, drive unit) the costs and instal complexity led me to a wind vane instead.

I’ve used various wind vanes before on long trips - both servo pendulum and independent rudder systems. In each case the vanes quickly became one of the most essential things on the boat.

Almost zero maintenance, very robust and zero electronics and battery draw and they work better as the wind blows harder.

In the end for our Maramu I chose a Hydrovane as it operates independently of the boats steering system and works well with a center cockpit arrangement.

It’s has been steering our boat faultlessly since we installed it. In fact I’ve hardly used the Raymarine autopilot since we added the Hydrovane.

I believe the windpilot Pacific 2 is similar in nature in that it steers the boat whilst the main rudder is locked off but Ive not had the pleasure of trying one out yet.
.

I wonder if the SM is getting a little too big for a wind vane. Anyone tried a wind vane on the SM?

All the best
Miles
Maramu 162

On 21 Jul 2019, at 09:19, JOHN HAYES <johnhayes862@...> wrote:

Thanks to those who responded with sensible advice

With time on our hands we bit the bullet first pulling the motor apart and discovered that the small springs holding the brushes in place needed a tweak so they applied more pressure to their task

Then we pulled the arm apart including the small ball bearings gave all a good clean then applied lithium grease. Delicate and slow work to get the ball bearings in place. (Same system as the steering in a David brown tractor)

Whole job took about 6 hours but the auto pilot is working again......whew!!!

There is a shipment of motors and arms heading to NZ in early August......nga Waka’s name is on one of them

Thanks again for the collective advice

Best

John Hayes Sn 41
On 21/07/2019, at 7:55 AM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Hi John, 7 days hand steering is not much fun, I feel for you. My ray marine auto helm stopped functioning once when we were transiting French Polynesia and there was limited help available. All those technicians I could find advised all sorts of expensive replacements. A wise long time cruiser said check the electrical connections to the linear drive. He was right, they were wrong. There was a corroded wire joint. I had wasted two weeks waiting for parts to be delivered. Although two weeks in Raeatea isn't too painful. My fist lesson. Many many faults on our boats systems are caused by simple connection corrosion.
Kind Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
On 20 July 2019 at 20:22 JOHN HAYES <johnhayes862@...> wrote:


Hi all

Nga Waka reached Nuku’alofa this afternoon after a slow head wind slog from Wellington; the last 7 days hand steered

The system on the yacht is a Raymarine ST6002 and has been very satisfactory.......until now! It’s a Non hydraulic system and we guess the problem may be brushes in the linear actuator.

Whether or not we can do a repair here in Nuku’alofa I’d like to purchase a second system to install so we might avoid the situation over the past week.

In that context has any one out there purchased an auto helm they find satisfactory and could you please provide a brand and model number.

Thanks for any help or advice anyone might supply

John Hayes sn 41





Re: Water maker Questions

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

Tom,

250 ppm is what you are looking for as far as TDS goes. The EPA’s recommended maximum level of TDS in water is 500 ppm.  Note, it's not a limit, just a recommendation.  The 500 number you saw may have been for Conductivity (proxy for Salinity) which is measure in microSiemens/cm (µS/cm).  You want that between 200 and 800 and I think Dessalator claims 250 TDS and 550 Conductivity in their marketing material. 

I picked up this kit from Amazon to test it:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077SQTKH4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I have no idea how accurate it is, but it gives me reasonable results for tap water, distilled water, Chesapeake Bay water and watermaker water so it appears to be accurate enough.
 
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Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA