Date   

Re: SM Climma AC - Calpeda Pump Voltage with Breakers Off

 

Dan,

I am a little lost as to where exactly you are measuring the voltage, but will generally respond.

Sounds to me like you could have 120v on the Earth wire (yellow/green) because you show zero between brown and blue. 
Causes:
  • This could be caused by shore power cable/plug wired incorrectly. I have seen the Earth wire (yellow/green) connected to the center post of a USA plug rather than to the metal sleeve of the plug. 
  • I have also seen marina pedestals wired wrong placing voltage on Earth wire (yellow/green
  • I have also seen this happen when using a pedestal shared with another boat which is wired wrong. 
I would trace starting with the pedestal connection.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Sat, Apr 27, 2019, 12:14 PM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:
Hi Gary,
I am on BeBe at Red Frog Marina in Panama wit 60Hz shore power.  I just checked, with all the AC breakers off but  the main GFI on, and I have: 1)  120v from blue to yellow/green, as well as from brown to the yellow/green. 2) I show 0 volts AC accross the blue to brown contacts (I don't understand how you could measure 240 v across the Blue to brown when the motor is not running?). 3) when I turn of the main GFI breaker there is no voltage.    I did not test the generator.  

That is a shocking discovery!  It would be very interesting to get confirmation of the voltages from a boat on 50 Hz supply. 

One thought: Could the stray voltage be coming back from the capacitor.  It shows 0 across the Blue to brow because the voltage on the blue and brown are on the same cycle when there is only one 120v source?  To test this I disconnected the blue and brown wires and measured the voltage of these independently: Blue wire to yellow/green was 120v, Brown wire to yellow/green showed 39v (Stray voltage?).  The voltage across the Blue to Brown was 120v.

I'm surprised this has not come up before, as it creates a very unsafe condition for one assuming the circuit is de-energized.  My conclusion is to disconnect at the pedistal when working on the AC circuits to be safe.

Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM#387




On Fri, Apr 19, 2019, 9:37 PM Gary Silver via Groups.Io <garysilver=mac.com@groups.io wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Bill and Eric:

Yes, all the 220 panel CBs are double pole (both Line [brown] and Neutral [Blue] are switched).  With all breakers open (tripped) there is still 240 VAC across the blue and brown leads at the Calpeda Pump when hooked to shore power, but not when the genset is running.  Looking at the Climma schematic (really more of a diagram) the neutral and safety ground wires are wire straight thru from the "separate source" and the Line [brown] from the separate source is switched by the relays to provide line voltage to the pump when a given unit is switched on. So I can see perhaps that there might be 110 voltage between the blue and safety ground at the pump from this "seperate source" but not the 220 that I am seeing.  Olivier, are you there?   What is the separate source for the Climma relay box?

I believe that the "other source" supply for the relay box is directly wired from the 220 volt buss just down-stream from the GFCI 30 amp breaker on the side of the 220 volt panel before it is distributed to any of the CBs (Diruptors).  The difference between Euro power and US power is noted and somehow plays into this.   Will continue to puzzle this out along with you.  Perhaps I need to get to sail to some European power, plug in and see if the mystery voltage goes away.

Thanks for your thoughts.

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 # 335
Puerto Rico 


SM Chain Counter Update

Thomas Peacock
 

Thanks to Ian, Seckin, Kelly and Ryan for your thoughts. I feel like I could declare Chain Counters as a thesis topic towards a PhD after the number of hours I have spent on this. I never considered myself obsessive before sailing this boat, it seems to be bringing that out in me. 
I’m not certain how many SM’s have a similar counter, our #240 was right on the cusp between SM and SM 2000, with features of both. It seems to be a LaRochelle designed counter, as the digital display has the Amel logo on it.
 
As mentioned, there are four cables coming into the junction box above the sink:
 
A 12.5 volts power from the Sailor 24V->12V transformer, two wires, straightforward power and ground; its sole function is power
 
A 24 volts power cable from the windlass control in the cockpit, three wires, one always 24 V, one ground, and one that is 24 V only when the windlass is activated; those wires then go to a block of three relays, which do something, I suspect in part activate the 12V part of the chain counter system, also perhaps convert the rotation of the windlass into meters
 
A three wire cable going forward to the windlass, one with 12.5 volts power, one ground, and the other one being a green signal wire with 11.75 volts power (derived from the display cable)
 
A four wire cable going to the digital display, one with 12.5 volts feeding off the power cable, one with 11.75 volts returning from the display (which feeds power to the green signal wire going to the windlass), the other two being used for signal
 
As mentioned, I have replaced the original sensor (IB5076, made by IFM, no longer in production), with one that is TOTALLY identical in all specs, IB5072, except for the fact that it is normally open. The 5076 was normally closed. These are heavy duty inductive sensors, just detecting proximity to conductive metal, no magnet necessary. They are structurally robust, designed for use in pickle factories! It’s a German company, and the Germans do love their pickles. There is an LED on the unit that will indicate that it is sensing.
 
When the sensor detects a conducting metal, it sends out about 0.7 volts, not sure how many milliamps. With the background voltage in the green signal wire of 11.75 volts, the voltage then rises to 12.5 volts. 
 
All that said, when running the windlass I could never get the chain counter display to change from “00”. I was able to change the sensor output from normally open to normally closed with a relay, again without any success on the counter.
 
After my therapist advised me to take a break from the chain counter obsession, I then went on to rebuild the windlass, which is now completely disassembled. Nevertheless, I returned to the chain counter problem, hooking up the sensor directly to the wires above the sink. I used a steel box cutter knife to act as a target for the sensor, ran the windlass switch (even though no windlass), et voilà!!! The display ticks off once for every three times I pass the knife in front of the sensor, I assume three revolutions of the windlass equals one meter. That was without having to change the open/closed status with a relay.
 
So, the system does now work, not sure why it didn’t work with the actual windlass. A little more trouble-shooting ahead when I get the windlass back on deck. Seckin, and anyone else who is having problems, feel free to contact me off forum if needs be, I’m happy to help. 
 
Tom Peacock
SM #240 Aletes
Rock Hall, Chesapeake Bay
 
I’m not certain how many SM’s have a similar counter, our #240 was right on the cusp between SM and SM 2000, with features of both. It seems to be a LaRochelle designed counter, as the digital display has the Amel logo on it.
 
As mentioned, there are four cables coming into the junction box above the sink:
 
A 12.5 volts power from the Sailor 24V->12V transformer, two wires, straightforward power and ground; its sole function is power
 
A 24 volts power cable from the windlass control in the cockpit, three wires, one always 24 V, one ground, and one that is 24 V only when the windlass is activated; those wires then go to a block of three relays, which do something, I suspect in part activate the 12V part of the chain counter system, also perhaps convert the rotation of the windlass into meters)
 
A three wire cable going forward to the windlass, one with 12.5 volts power, one ground, and the other one being a green signal wire with 11.75 volts power (derived from the display cable)
 
A four wire cable going to the digital display, one with 12.5 volts feeding off the power cable, one with 11.75 volts returning from the display (which feeds power to the green signal wire going to the windlass), the other two being used for signal
 
As mentioned, I have replaced the original sensor (IB5076, made by IFM, no longer in production), with one that is TOTALLY identical in all specs, IB5072, except for the fact that it is normally open. The 5076 was normally closed. These are heavy duty inductive sensors, just detecting proximity to conductive metal, no magnet necessary. They are structurally robust, designed for use in pickle factories! It’s a German company, and the Germans do love their pickles. There is an LED on the unit that will indicate that it is sensing.
 
When the sensor detects a conducting metal, it sends out about 0.7 volts, not sure how many milliamps. With the background voltage in the green signal wire of 11.75 volts, the voltage then rises to 12.5 volts. 
 
All that said, when running the windlass I could never get the chain counter display to change from “00”. I was able to change the sensor output from normally open to normally closed with a relay, again without any success on the counter.
 
After my therapist advised me to take a break from the chain counter obsession, I then went on to rebuild the windlass, which is now completely disassembled. Nevertheless, I returned to the chain counter problem, hooking up the sensor directly to the wires above the sink. I used a steel box cutter knife to act as a target for the sensor, ran the windlass switch (even though no windlass), et voilà!!! The display ticks off once for every three times I pass the knife in front of the sensor, I assume three revolutions of the windlass equals one meter. That was without having to change the open/closed status with a relay.
 
So, the system does now work, not sure why it didn’t work with the actual windlass. A little more trouble-shooting ahead when I get the windlass back on deck. Seckin, and anyone else who is having problems, feel free to contact me off forum if needs be, I’m happy to help. 
 
Tom Peacock
SM #240 Aletes
Rock Hall, Chesapeake Bay

I’m not certain how many SM’s have a similar counter, our #240 was right on the cusp between SM and SM 2000, with features of both. It seems to be a LaRochelle designed counter, as the digital display has the Amel logo on it.
 
As mentioned, there are four cables coming into the junction box above the sink:
 
A 12.5 volts power from the Sailor 24V->12V transformer, two wires, straightforward power and ground; its sole function is power
 
A 24 volts power cable from the windlass control in the cockpit, three wires, one always 24 V, one ground, and one that is 24 V only when the windlass is activated; those wires then go to a block of three relays, which do something, I suspect in part activate the 12V part of the chain counter system, also perhaps convert the rotation of the windlass into meters)
 
A three wire cable going forward to the windlass, one with 12.5 volts power, one ground, and the other one being a green signal wire with 11.75 volts power (derived from the display cable)
 
A four wire cable going to the digital display, one with 12.5 volts feeding off the power cable, one with 11.75 volts returning from the display (which feeds power to the green signal wire going to the windlass), the other two being used for signal
 
As mentioned, I have replaced the original sensor (IB5076, made by IFM, no longer in production), with one that is TOTALLY identical in all specs, IB5072, except for the fact that it is normally open. The 5076 was normally closed. These are heavy duty inductive sensors, just detecting proximity to conductive metal, no magnet necessary. They are structurally robust, designed for use in pickle factories! It’s a German company, and the Germans do love their pickles. There is an LED on the unit that will indicate that it is sensing.
 
When the sensor detects a conducting metal, it sends out about 0.7 volts, not sure how many milliamps. With the background voltage in the green signal wire of 11.75 volts, the voltage then rises to 12.5 volts. 
 
All that said, when running the windlass I could never get the chain counter display to change from “00”. I was able to change the sensor output from normally open to normally closed with a relay, again without any success on the counter.
 
After my therapist advised me to take a break from the chain counter obsession, I then went on to rebuild the windlass, which is now completely disassembled. Nevertheless, I returned to the chain counter problem, hooking up the sensor directly to the wires above the sink. I used a steel box cutter knife to act as a target for the sensor, ran the windlass switch (even though no windlass), et voilà!!! The display ticks off once for every three times I pass the knife in front of the sensor, I assume three revolutions of the windlass equals one meter. That was without having to change the open/closed status with a relay.
 
So, the system does now work, not sure why it didn’t work with the actual windlass. A little more trouble-shooting ahead when I get the windlass back on deck. Seckin, and anyone else who is having problems, feel free to contact me off forum if needs be, I’m happy to help. 
 
Tom Peacock
SM #240 Aletes
Rock Hall, Chesapeake Bay
 
 
 
 


Re: Sailing north to Annapolis

Mark Erdos
 

Fernandina Beach FL

Cumberland Island GA (National Park)

Charleston SC

Beaufort NC (a good spot to wait for a window to get around Cape Hateras)

Hampton VA (inside the Chesapeake Bay)

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - San Blas Islands, Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Wolfgang Weber via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, April 26, 2019 9:48 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Sailing north to Annapolis

 

Hi to the group,
After sailing the Bahamas I am on the way to the north. I will leave the boat for 2 months in Annapolis.Today we sailed from Fort Lauderdale to St. Augustine. Are there any recommendations for the next stops - Marina or Anchorage ?
Thank you very much Wolfgang SY Elise Amel 54 #162 


Re: SM Climma AC - Calpeda Pump Voltage with Breakers Off

Dan Carlson
 

Hi Gary,
I am on BeBe at Red Frog Marina in Panama wit 60Hz shore power.  I just checked, with all the AC breakers off but  the main GFI on, and I have: 1)  120v from blue to yellow/green, as well as from brown to the yellow/green. 2) I show 0 volts AC accross the blue to brown contacts (I don't understand how you could measure 240 v across the Blue to brown when the motor is not running?). 3) when I turn of the main GFI breaker there is no voltage.    I did not test the generator.  

That is a shocking discovery!  It would be very interesting to get confirmation of the voltages from a boat on 50 Hz supply. 

One thought: Could the stray voltage be coming back from the capacitor.  It shows 0 across the Blue to brow because the voltage on the blue and brown are on the same cycle when there is only one 120v source?  To test this I disconnected the blue and brown wires and measured the voltage of these independently: Blue wire to yellow/green was 120v, Brown wire to yellow/green showed 39v (Stray voltage?).  The voltage across the Blue to Brown was 120v.

I'm surprised this has not come up before, as it creates a very unsafe condition for one assuming the circuit is de-energized.  My conclusion is to disconnect at the pedistal when working on the AC circuits to be safe.

Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM#387




On Fri, Apr 19, 2019, 9:37 PM Gary Silver via Groups.Io <garysilver=mac.com@groups.io wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Bill and Eric:

Yes, all the 220 panel CBs are double pole (both Line [brown] and Neutral [Blue] are switched).  With all breakers open (tripped) there is still 240 VAC across the blue and brown leads at the Calpeda Pump when hooked to shore power, but not when the genset is running.  Looking at the Climma schematic (really more of a diagram) the neutral and safety ground wires are wire straight thru from the "separate source" and the Line [brown] from the separate source is switched by the relays to provide line voltage to the pump when a given unit is switched on. So I can see perhaps that there might be 110 voltage between the blue and safety ground at the pump from this "seperate source" but not the 220 that I am seeing.  Olivier, are you there?   What is the separate source for the Climma relay box?

I believe that the "other source" supply for the relay box is directly wired from the 220 volt buss just down-stream from the GFCI 30 amp breaker on the side of the 220 volt panel before it is distributed to any of the CBs (Diruptors).  The difference between Euro power and US power is noted and somehow plays into this.   Will continue to puzzle this out along with you.  Perhaps I need to get to sail to some European power, plug in and see if the mystery voltage goes away.

Thanks for your thoughts.

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 # 335
Puerto Rico 


Connecting wind data to AP

ngtnewington Newington
 

Eureka sailing to wind. Only problem now is that it’s 20-25 kn true but laying Funchal for now.
Nick
Amelia
AML54 -019 on passage towards Madeira


Interior wood

Joerg Esdorn
 

Hi, I have the light colored oak interior on my boat and am wondering whether to treat the wood in some way.  There are some corners where a bit of dirt has accumulated.  Any suggestions would be most welcome.  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53 Kincsem 


Re: Sailing north to Annapolis

Courtney Gorman
 

Brunswick Landing Marina in Brunswick GA 
Cheers 🍻 


On Apr 26, 2019, at 9:47 PM, Wolfgang Weber via Groups.Io <webercardio@...> wrote:

Hi to the group,
After sailing the Bahamas I am on the way to the north. I will leave the boat for 2 months in Annapolis.Today we sailed from Fort Lauderdale to St. Augustine. Are there any recommendations for the next stops - Marina or Anchorage ?
Thank you very much Wolfgang SY Elise Amel 54 #162 


SM Fairlead

Keith Tice
 

My SM2K stern fairleads need to be replaced.
Amel no longer offers this part.
The port fairlead is warped and the starboard fairlead was replaced by the previous owner, but the replacement fairlead is biting into the 20mm mooring lines.
I have been unable to locate a fairlead as large and smooth as the original fairleads fitted by Amel.
The previous owner told me that Amel switched to roller fairleads, but that they do not fit the available space on the SM2K.

Keith Tice
Bikini - SM2K #282


Sailing north to Annapolis

Wolfgang Weber
 

Hi to the group,
After sailing the Bahamas I am on the way to the north. I will leave the boat for 2 months in Annapolis.Today we sailed from Fort Lauderdale to St. Augustine. Are there any recommendations for the next stops - Marina or Anchorage ?
Thank you very much Wolfgang SY Elise Amel 54 #162 


Re: Changing engine bearings Amel Mango Perkins 4.236

Arlo
 

If you can forward the contact details and what you nwed to order ro me plwaae it would help me out a lot. This is a project on my list as well to do soon.
Thanks Arlo
1985 Mango
Seaduction


Re: Capacitors for Climma A/C

Alexander Ramseyer
 

Thanks James!
--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
Am 25.04.19, 15:26, "James Cromie via Groups.Io" <jamescromie@...> schrieb:

Alex - for what it is worth, here is the list of capacitors I received to replace those on my Climma Compact 9 units on my Super Maramu:


James
Soteria
SM2K #347
On Apr 24, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Alex Ramseyer <alexramseyer@...> wrote:

Hi James,
thanks for the response and YES, it would be helpful to have your invoice.
best regards,
Alex
--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
Am 24.04.19, 18:39, "James Cromie via Groups.Io" <jamescromie@...> schrieb:
Alex - I have replaced all of the fan and compressor capacitors for each of my Climma Compact 9 units and the capacitors for my Dessalator motors with capacitors available through Coastal Climate Control. To hey so provide a slight discount if you are a Bill Rouse client.  One or two capacitors are not available from them.  I sourced these from Eurton Electronics. All units work flawlessly, and others have used the same capacitors.  Prices are very reasonable able at Eurton. 

I can provide my invoice if so desired. 

Best,
James
Soteria SM2k #347
Culebra

On Apr 24, 2019 17:22, Alex Ramseyer <alexramseyer@...> wrote:
Dear Amelians,
I'm trying to source 2mf and 4 mf Capacitors for the onboard Climma A/C unit. I'm currently in Fort Lauderdale.
The technician from a local Climma representative told me it needs to be the original Italfarad- but has no stock.

What's the experience in this group. Does it really have to be Italfarad or will any other (available) capacitor with the correct specs work too?

Best regards,
Alex Ramseyer
SY NO STRESS
AMEL54 #15
--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.



Re: SM Chain Counter Wiring

Mike Ondra
 

If the display is on with 00 and not counting, does passing a magnet (or maybe plain iron) near the sensor several times have any effect? Does the sensor “click” when doing so or other evidence that it is being triggered? Some way to determine if the sensor is indeed doing its job.

Mike

Aletes SM#240

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Thomas Peacock
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 7:29 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] SM Chain Counter Wiring

 

I am still trying to get my factory installed (SM #240) chain counter working. The old sensor by the windlass was indeed shorted out; I had to replace with a unit identical except for the fact that the old sensor was normally on, and the new sensor is normally off. I have managed to switch that configuration by inserting a relay in the circuit. 
Despite this, the counter is not yet working. The display unit in the cockpit does light up at "00", but I can't seem to get it to count. In sussing out the wiring, I opened up the junction box above the galley and looked at the connections. 
There are basically four cables: one for power (two wires), one that goes forward to the windlass (three wires), one that goes to the cockpit windlass controls (three wires), and one to the display. (four tiny wires) 
The display has four tiny wires: red, black, green, and blue. The red supplies power, the black is ground, and the green connects with the green wire coming back from the windlass that I believe is the "signal wire", that changes as the windlass rotates. What seems unusual is that the tiny green wire energizes the forward wire, regardless other input, all the time. My sense is that the entire green circuit should be without voltage unless the sensor sends a current. I am concerned that there might be short or other problem that is causing the tiny green wire from the display to carry current. 
I know this is an esoteric question, but if anyone has any feedback I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks as always,
Tom Peacock
SM #240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: SM Chain Counter Wiring

Teun BAAS
 

 .



T

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: "ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> via Groups.Io" <ianjudyjenkins@...>
Date: 4/26/19 18:17 (GMT+11:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] SM Chain Counter Wiring

Hi Seckin,

Have you made sure that the little stainless button on the winch is clean and shiny? Sometimes if that's dirty it fails to trigger the sensor as it xgoes round.

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Greece

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Seckin Barlas <seckinbar@...>
Sent: 26 April 2019 07:11
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] SM Chain Counter Wiring
 
Hi Thomas;

I have exactly the same problem with you.

I changed the orenge color sensor near the windlass.
(older was burned out)
Led indicator was ON

Display is always shows 00 in the cocpit.

But the counter is not counting the chain.

I really appreciate if we can solve the problem.
Regards;
Seckin Barlas
SY HAYAT 
SM#76



On 26 Apr 2019, at 02:29, Thomas Peacock <peacock8491@...> wrote:

l trying to get my factory installed (SM #240) chain counter working. The old sensor by the windlass was indeed shorted out; I had to replace with a unit identical except for the fact that the old sensor was normally on, and the new sensor is normally off. I have managed to switch that configuration by inserting a relay in the circuit. 
Despite this, the counter is not yet working. The display unit in the cockpit does light up at "00", but I can't seem to get it to count. In sussing out the wiring, I opened up the junction box above the galley and looked at the connections.


Re: SM Chain Counter Wiring

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Seckin,

Have you made sure that the little stainless button on the winch is clean and shiny? Sometimes if that's dirty it fails to trigger the sensor as it goes round.

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Seckin Barlas <seckinbar@...>
Sent: 26 April 2019 07:11
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] SM Chain Counter Wiring
 
Hi Thomas;

I have exactly the same problem with you.

I changed the orenge color sensor near the windlass.
(older was burned out)
Led indicator was ON

Display is always shows 00 in the cocpit.

But the counter is not counting the chain.

I really appreciate if we can solve the problem.
Regards;
Seckin Barlas
SY HAYAT 
SM#76



On 26 Apr 2019, at 02:29, Thomas Peacock <peacock8491@...> wrote:

l trying to get my factory installed (SM #240) chain counter working. The old sensor by the windlass was indeed shorted out; I had to replace with a unit identical except for the fact that the old sensor was normally on, and the new sensor is normally off. I have managed to switch that configuration by inserting a relay in the circuit. 
Despite this, the counter is not yet working. The display unit in the cockpit does light up at "00", but I can't seem to get it to count. In sussing out the wiring, I opened up the junction box above the galley and looked at the connections.


Re: SM Chain Counter Wiring

Seckin Barlas
 

Hi Thomas;

I have exactly the same problem with you.

I changed the orenge color sensor near the windlass.
(older was burned out)
Led indicator was ON

Display is always shows 00 in the cocpit.

But the counter is not counting the chain.

I really appreciate if we can solve the problem.
Regards;
Seckin Barlas
SY HAYAT 
SM#76



On 26 Apr 2019, at 02:29, Thomas Peacock <peacock8491@...> wrote:

l trying to get my factory installed (SM #240) chain counter working. The old sensor by the windlass was indeed shorted out; I had to replace with a unit identical except for the fact that the old sensor was normally on, and the new sensor is normally off. I have managed to switch that configuration by inserting a relay in the circuit. 
Despite this, the counter is not yet working. The display unit in the cockpit does light up at "00", but I can't seem to get it to count. In sussing out the wiring, I opened up the junction box above the galley and looked at the connections.


Re: SM Chain Counter Wiring

Kelly Ran
 

Hi Thomas,

Just brainstorming here...

What model display do you have? Is there a manual with a wiring diagram online?

What kind of sensor are you using (do you have a part number)? Is it magnetic? Optical? Our "aftermarket" sensor is magnetic. You can try passing a magnet in front of the sensor and seeing if the chain count increments. 

How did you convert the normally open sensor to normally closed? What kind of relay did you use (hopefully normally closed?), etc...

Have you tried the new sensor with no inverting relay? The display might be edge triggered and may not care about polarity. 

When we debugged our chain counter, we found that it requires: 1. A sensor on the windlass, and 2. An input (possibly from control panel) to indicate direction of chain travel.
Our sensor does not signal directionality at all.

Where does the blue wire go?

Good luck
Kelly + Ryan
SM233 Iteration
Block Island


On Thu, Apr 25, 2019, 19:29 Thomas Peacock <peacock8491@...> wrote:
I am still trying to get my factory installed (SM #240) chain counter working. The old sensor by the windlass was indeed shorted out; I had to replace with a unit identical except for the fact that the old sensor was normally on, and the new sensor is normally off. I have managed to switch that configuration by inserting a relay in the circuit. 
Despite this, the counter is not yet working. The display unit in the cockpit does light up at "00", but I can't seem to get it to count. In sussing out the wiring, I opened up the junction box above the galley and looked at the connections. 
There are basically four cables: one for power (two wires), one that goes forward to the windlass (three wires), one that goes to the cockpit windlass controls (three wires), and one to the display. (four tiny wires) 
The display has four tiny wires: red, black, green, and blue. The red supplies power, the black is ground, and the green connects with the green wire coming back from the windlass that I believe is the "signal wire", that changes as the windlass rotates. What seems unusual is that the tiny green wire energizes the forward wire, regardless other input, all the time. My sense is that the entire green circuit should be without voltage unless the sensor sends a current. I am concerned that there might be short or other problem that is causing the tiny green wire from the display to carry current. 
I know this is an esoteric question, but if anyone has any feedback I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks as always,
Tom Peacock
SM #240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


SM Chain Counter Wiring

Thomas Peacock
 

I am still trying to get my factory installed (SM #240) chain counter working. The old sensor by the windlass was indeed shorted out; I had to replace with a unit identical except for the fact that the old sensor was normally on, and the new sensor is normally off. I have managed to switch that configuration by inserting a relay in the circuit. 
Despite this, the counter is not yet working. The display unit in the cockpit does light up at "00", but I can't seem to get it to count. In sussing out the wiring, I opened up the junction box above the galley and looked at the connections. 
There are basically four cables: one for power (two wires), one that goes forward to the windlass (three wires), one that goes to the cockpit windlass controls (three wires), and one to the display. (four tiny wires) 
The display has four tiny wires: red, black, green, and blue. The red supplies power, the black is ground, and the green connects with the green wire coming back from the windlass that I believe is the "signal wire", that changes as the windlass rotates. What seems unusual is that the tiny green wire energizes the forward wire, regardless other input, all the time. My sense is that the entire green circuit should be without voltage unless the sensor sends a current. I am concerned that there might be short or other problem that is causing the tiny green wire from the display to carry current. 
I know this is an esoteric question, but if anyone has any feedback I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks as always,
Tom Peacock
SM #240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: wind data to Raymarine ST 6000

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hello all who have responded. 
I arrived back on Amelia this afternoon. We launch tomorrow.
I did have a go at linking the AP with some success. Though it is yet to be tested.
This forum has come up trumps. Many of the 9 FFD cables are not connected to anything. Since I already ran the cable from the AP N MEA +ve and -ve input back to the chart table I simply connected the purple from FFD to the + Input and the black to the - input. The black is connected to the processor terminal 16, so I just added the AP - nmea input wire to that terminal. 
Hey presto we have wind data to the AP.
I plan to check the systems tomorrow and be ready to sail on Saturday, I am watching the weather. There is a boisterous option on Saturday when I might be close to laying Madeira in one tack but there is the possibility of a fair wind, all be it a bit light and variable, on Thursday. Trouble is the forecast models I watch conflict. 6 days ahead is stretching it a bit for accurate forecasts.
Gentlemen never sail to windward.......dream on.

Nick back aboard Amelia
Tazacorte, La Palma
Aml 54-019


On 25 Apr 2019, at 19:49, Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:

We do use sail to wind  in close reach situations.  The autopilot will give us an audible alarm when there is a wind shift that it cannot keep up with.  

I am confused about the peecieved risk of STW.  If you sail to a heading and the wind shifts, there will be no alarm and you may still accidently gybe or stall. 

Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM#387



On Thu, Apr 25, 2019, 1:22 PM John Clark <john.biohead@... wrote:
Hi Nick,
    sorry for the tardy response...just started new job and am in process of buying a house...  On my SM with a Hydra2000 system the FFD with NMEA was installed however the NMEA output from the FFD was not used, so the two NMEA leads were folded up and taped to the back of the display.  The FFD Display is the device that generates and transmits the NMEA data.  Someone here said it is the violet colored lead, I think that is correct.  .  

As far as steering to wind (STW) I did exactly what you are trying to do.  I have a newer Raymarine AP (EV-400) with the ACU 400 actuator control and an Es78 chartplotter, I suspect the ST6000 will behave the same.   

. I ran the NMEA output from the FFD direct to the chartplotter on the helm and it feeds the signal to the AP via the Raymarine network. Incidentally my Furuno AIS transponder(thanks you SV Tritin) located at the nav station uses the same wire to send AIS data to the chartplotter.  I have had no issues with the dual usage of the same wire. 

 I have sailed maybe 2000nm in the STW mode. In sail to wind, the system is for the most part great. I use it primarily sailing close to wind.  Other wind angles are more forgiving so I use heading mode otherwise.  As one person said here,  sudden wind shifts can outmaneuver the pilot.  I have had this happen once or twice.   I always sail with the preventer rigged so other than looking like a sailing rube there is no damage to the boat or sails.  Stronger wind is better.   In light wind when the motion of the boat affects the apparent wind angle the AP still works but I suspect it is cycling at least a little bit futilely chasing the moving mast...but it does hold course to the wind. (note it is not a lot of motion of the wheel but I can tell it is having trouble making up its mind.)

Regards,  John

SV Annie  SM #37
Brunswick, Georgia
 


On Sun, Apr 14, 2019 at 8:54 AM ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Gary,

The plot thickens, all very interesting. At the end of the process, if the view is that the response of the autopilot to wind shifts is too slow to be practical I see no point in the exercise.  I have the wind data I need to see on the B&G  displays, which is enough. 

However

It is interesting this whole exercise. When I fitted a new speedo, I looked at various options but Richard at Tinley electronics advised me to go for the paddle wheel as the “Baud rate” is important for updating the speed data so that true wind is calculated accurately. He said that some other speedo’s would be slower to update the processor……etc etc. I suspect that the wind data to the autopilot needs to be at the correct Baud Rate for it all to work well.

On my last boat I had B&G system Hydra 2000 system and B&G autopilot. I could set it to steer say 35 degrees to the apparent wind and she would helm the boat up wind following every lift or header. Or run square downwind without gybing accidentally.

 I may well try splicing or actually just sharing some terminals for the FFD NMEA output that become processor input terminals on the processor to the Auto input and see what happens.

Thank you for the information. It looks like I will have to play around and see what I get.

Best

Nick
Amelia AML 54-019 La Palma

On 14 Apr 2019, at 13:33, Gary Silver via Groups.Io <garysilver@...> wrote:

Hi Nick:  What I have to say applies to my 2001 vintage B & G 2000 FFD (full function display), B & G Hydra 2000 processor, and Raymarine ST7000+ autopilot.  I am going from my Cadd drawings from 18 years ago. NOTE:  There evidently are NMEA FFDs and non-NMEA FFDs 

There is a nine conductor cable that runs from the NMEA FFD to the Hydra processor.  In my case the NMEA wires were NOT connected to anything at the Hydra processor.   Amel had hooked up the supplied Furuno GPS to the Hydra NMEA processor Inputs, but there were no other NMEA inputs connected.  

In that 9 conductor cable from the NMEA FFD the violet (NMEA Output Signal) and black (Ground) wires are the NMEA OUT from the FFD, and the brown (NMEA Input Signal) and blue (NMEA Input Return) are the NMEA input TO the FFD.  My confusion at the time was because there are NMEA terminals on the Hydra processor but they are hooked up to the Amel installed Furuno GPS only.   I spoke to Pochon (Amel's electronics sub-contractor) shortly after the the time we took delivery of the boat and they instructed me to hook things up the way I did, that being,  splicing wires to the violet, black, brown and blue wires and running the NMEA out and NMEA in (from the FFD) to the auto-pilot computer. I do have a note that the NMEA shields should ONLY BE GROUNDED AT THE TRANSMITTING END OF THE CABLE. 


 Based on aviation ARINC 429 data bus (similar to NMEA data bus) NMEA data wires can be paralleled, so I think in retrospect it should have been possible to have those NMEA wires from the FFD go to the pins 21/22 and 26/27 of the Hydra, I am not sure why Amel didn't hook it up that way. 

In my case I ran two, 2-conductor twisted pair shielded aviation grade tefzel wires from the Hydra and ran them to the autopilot computer NMEA input and output lugs.  It has been 18 years since I did this but I vaguely remember that there was some sort of setting in the FFD programming or perhaps it was at the autopilot,  that had to be set (something like a node designation) or something.  

Joel at the time told me, and my experience has born this out, that winds can change too dramatically to allow the auto-pilot to steer to the wind (a squall comes, the boat jibes and damage is done).  So I only display the relative wind at the helm and use the heading mode of the Auto Pilot to actually do the steering. 

I hope this gives you some clues and doesn't further muddy the waters. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335 (2001)
Puerto Rico



Re: wind data to Raymarine ST 6000

John Clark
 

Dan you are right, yes I forgot about the alarm.  At least on the newer AP if the course over ground changes too much in a short period an alarm will sound, also an alarm if there is a gybe and the AP cannot get the wind angle right.  In my experience the former occurs with a weather front or squall, the latter with light wind.  


On Thu, Apr 25, 2019 at 2:50 PM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:
We do use sail to wind  in close reach situations.  The autopilot will give us an audible alarm when there is a wind shift that it cannot keep up with.  

I am confused about the peecieved risk of STW.  If you sail to a heading and the wind shifts, there will be no alarm and you may still accidently gybe or stall. 

Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM#387



On Thu, Apr 25, 2019, 1:22 PM John Clark <john.biohead@... wrote:
Hi Nick,
    sorry for the tardy response...just started new job and am in process of buying a house...  On my SM with a Hydra2000 system the FFD with NMEA was installed however the NMEA output from the FFD was not used, so the two NMEA leads were folded up and taped to the back of the display.  The FFD Display is the device that generates and transmits the NMEA data.  Someone here said it is the violet colored lead, I think that is correct.  .  

As far as steering to wind (STW) I did exactly what you are trying to do.  I have a newer Raymarine AP (EV-400) with the ACU 400 actuator control and an Es78 chartplotter, I suspect the ST6000 will behave the same.   

. I ran the NMEA output from the FFD direct to the chartplotter on the helm and it feeds the signal to the AP via the Raymarine network. Incidentally my Furuno AIS transponder(thanks you SV Tritin) located at the nav station uses the same wire to send AIS data to the chartplotter.  I have had no issues with the dual usage of the same wire. 

 I have sailed maybe 2000nm in the STW mode. In sail to wind, the system is for the most part great. I use it primarily sailing close to wind.  Other wind angles are more forgiving so I use heading mode otherwise.  As one person said here,  sudden wind shifts can outmaneuver the pilot.  I have had this happen once or twice.   I always sail with the preventer rigged so other than looking like a sailing rube there is no damage to the boat or sails.  Stronger wind is better.   In light wind when the motion of the boat affects the apparent wind angle the AP still works but I suspect it is cycling at least a little bit futilely chasing the moving mast...but it does hold course to the wind. (note it is not a lot of motion of the wheel but I can tell it is having trouble making up its mind.)

Regards,  John

SV Annie  SM #37
Brunswick, Georgia
 


On Sun, Apr 14, 2019 at 8:54 AM ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Gary,

The plot thickens, all very interesting. At the end of the process, if the view is that the response of the autopilot to wind shifts is too slow to be practical I see no point in the exercise.  I have the wind data I need to see on the B&G  displays, which is enough. 

However

It is interesting this whole exercise. When I fitted a new speedo, I looked at various options but Richard at Tinley electronics advised me to go for the paddle wheel as the “Baud rate” is important for updating the speed data so that true wind is calculated accurately. He said that some other speedo’s would be slower to update the processor……etc etc. I suspect that the wind data to the autopilot needs to be at the correct Baud Rate for it all to work well.

On my last boat I had B&G system Hydra 2000 system and B&G autopilot. I could set it to steer say 35 degrees to the apparent wind and she would helm the boat up wind following every lift or header. Or run square downwind without gybing accidentally.

 I may well try splicing or actually just sharing some terminals for the FFD NMEA output that become processor input terminals on the processor to the Auto input and see what happens.

Thank you for the information. It looks like I will have to play around and see what I get.

Best

Nick
Amelia AML 54-019 La Palma

On 14 Apr 2019, at 13:33, Gary Silver via Groups.Io <garysilver@...> wrote:

Hi Nick:  What I have to say applies to my 2001 vintage B & G 2000 FFD (full function display), B & G Hydra 2000 processor, and Raymarine ST7000+ autopilot.  I am going from my Cadd drawings from 18 years ago. NOTE:  There evidently are NMEA FFDs and non-NMEA FFDs 

There is a nine conductor cable that runs from the NMEA FFD to the Hydra processor.  In my case the NMEA wires were NOT connected to anything at the Hydra processor.   Amel had hooked up the supplied Furuno GPS to the Hydra NMEA processor Inputs, but there were no other NMEA inputs connected.  

In that 9 conductor cable from the NMEA FFD the violet (NMEA Output Signal) and black (Ground) wires are the NMEA OUT from the FFD, and the brown (NMEA Input Signal) and blue (NMEA Input Return) are the NMEA input TO the FFD.  My confusion at the time was because there are NMEA terminals on the Hydra processor but they are hooked up to the Amel installed Furuno GPS only.   I spoke to Pochon (Amel's electronics sub-contractor) shortly after the the time we took delivery of the boat and they instructed me to hook things up the way I did, that being,  splicing wires to the violet, black, brown and blue wires and running the NMEA out and NMEA in (from the FFD) to the auto-pilot computer. I do have a note that the NMEA shields should ONLY BE GROUNDED AT THE TRANSMITTING END OF THE CABLE. 


 Based on aviation ARINC 429 data bus (similar to NMEA data bus) NMEA data wires can be paralleled, so I think in retrospect it should have been possible to have those NMEA wires from the FFD go to the pins 21/22 and 26/27 of the Hydra, I am not sure why Amel didn't hook it up that way. 

In my case I ran two, 2-conductor twisted pair shielded aviation grade tefzel wires from the Hydra and ran them to the autopilot computer NMEA input and output lugs.  It has been 18 years since I did this but I vaguely remember that there was some sort of setting in the FFD programming or perhaps it was at the autopilot,  that had to be set (something like a node designation) or something.  

Joel at the time told me, and my experience has born this out, that winds can change too dramatically to allow the auto-pilot to steer to the wind (a squall comes, the boat jibes and damage is done).  So I only display the relative wind at the helm and use the heading mode of the Auto Pilot to actually do the steering. 

I hope this gives you some clues and doesn't further muddy the waters. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335 (2001)
Puerto Rico



Re: Capacitors for Climma A/C

James Cromie
 

Alex - for what it is worth, here is the list of capacitors I received to replace those on my Climma Compact 9 units on my Super Maramu:


James
Soteria
SM2K #347

On Apr 24, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Alex Ramseyer <alexramseyer@...> wrote:

Hi James,
thanks for the response and YES, it would be helpful to have your invoice.
best regards,
Alex
--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
Am 24.04.19, 18:39, "James Cromie via Groups.Io" <jamescromie@...> schrieb:
Alex - I have replaced all of the fan and compressor capacitors for each of my Climma Compact 9 units and the capacitors for my Dessalator motors with capacitors available through Coastal Climate Control. To hey so provide a slight discount if you are a Bill Rouse client.  One or two capacitors are not available from them.  I sourced these from Eurton Electronics. All units work flawlessly, and others have used the same capacitors.  Prices are very reasonable able at Eurton. 

I can provide my invoice if so desired. 

Best,
James
Soteria SM2k #347
Culebra

On Apr 24, 2019 17:22, Alex Ramseyer <alexramseyer@...> wrote:
Dear Amelians,
I'm trying to source 2mf and 4 mf Capacitors for the onboard Climma A/C unit. I'm currently in Fort Lauderdale.
The technician from a local Climma representative told me it needs to be the original Italfarad- but has no stock.

What's the experience in this group. Does it really have to be Italfarad or will any other (available) capacitor with the correct specs work too?

Best regards,
Alex Ramseyer
SY NO STRESS
AMEL54 #15
--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.