Date   

Re: Windlass switch

Gregory Shea
 

Duane, 
That makes perfect sense. Tomorrow’s job, thanks. One dollar to do the hitting, 49 for knowing where to hit.

Greg Shea
Sharki 133 Cap des Iles
Currently at Preveza




On May 19, 2019, at 9:31 PM, Duane Siegfri via Groups.Io <carlylelk@...> wrote:

Greg,

I'm not sure from your question: are you trying to unscrew them from the outside of the casing?

If so you need to remove the nuts on the aft of the windlass aluminum cover, then slide the cover aft.  You'll find a nut on the inside of the case on the switch.  Remove the wires first, then the nut.  Make sure you use a good sealant that you can get apart later to make the switches watertight to the case.  

If the rubber boot you mention is the surface you press on, it has a lip that goes under the actual hard plastic switch that lies beneath.  You'll have to remove the switch to replace that.

On my SM this is the proceedure for the Lofrans Tigres, but on older models it might be different.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: Windlass switch

Duane Siegfri
 

Greg,

I'm not sure from your question: are you trying to unscrew them from the outside of the casing?

If so you need to remove the nuts on the aft of the windlass aluminum cover, then slide the cover aft.  You'll find a nut on the inside of the case on the switch.  Remove the wires first, then the nut.  Make sure you use a good sealant that you can get apart later to make the switches watertight to the case.  

If the rubber boot you mention is the surface you press on, it has a lip that goes under the actual hard plastic switch that lies beneath.  You'll have to remove the switch to replace that.

On my SM this is the proceedure for the Lofrans Tigres, but on older models it might be different.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: Marco UP6/E pump and MASS+ light

Duane Siegfri
 

Scott,

I had the same issue (masse light) with my Marco UP3E pump.  I would be very interested in what you may have learned.. 

I also removed the bonding wire from the pump to solve the problem.  However, a year later the pump stopped running in a place I could not easily replace it.  I disassembled the motor and found the motor brush wire was completely corroded and had fallen apart.  I'm guessing that the corroded wire was touching the case???  As a temporary repair I soldered in a new brush wire, but I don't expect it to work for long. 

I'm not sure what caused the brush wire to corrode.  Only one of them did, the other was fine.  Now I need to replace the pump and I am not sure I want another Marco pump.  The cause of the corrosion could be external to the pump I suppose.  There were not any leaks wetting the pump.  The only thing I can think of causing the corrosion was the plumbing fittings I used.  They were advertised as 316 stainless steel, but they are corroding internally like mad.  I'm replacing that plumbing with Pex, plastic fittings and stainless pinch rings.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: The two "sticks" on the genoa top swivel

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Thanks everyone for the informative responses on this topic. We're having a new set of horns fabricated and plan to cover them with some hose material. Anything one can do to reduce halyard wraps, cuts, jams, etc. is certainly worthwhile.

On a side note, while up at the masthead I noticed the foil/extrusion was heavily scratched around it's circumference for several inches right where the top swivel would sit. Perhaps there's an issue with our top swivel and it should be taken apart and serviced? Although while at deck level it spins easily and sounds very smooth. Or maybe the threads on the one horn we had up there were too long and made contact with the foil while furling? Just wondering if anyone has ever seen anything similar on their boat. Sorry no photo at the moment but I'll try and get one.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV Trilogy, SM#23
Panama


On Mon, 13 May 2019, 08:05 Gary Wells, <gary@...> wrote:
A short piece of fuel line and some contact cement make good "caps" for those 'horns'.
Having experienced a halyard wrap up there once, I wouldn't consider running without them.
If you are doing regular maintenance on the swivel then it's far less likely the horns would touch the mast, but if the swivel jams even slightly the horns are the best defense against getting the halyard wrapped and broken at the masthead.  
Can't really explain how I discovered this.  :)

Gary W.
SM 209, "Adagio"
Beaufort, NC USA


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Mike Ondra
 

Nice detail. I’m going to leave the steel stub in the floor. After installing the PVC pipe I’ll glass it in heavily as well. If the steel eventually rots out the PVC and fiberglass should conduct the chain into the locker effectively. Anyway that’s the theory.
Mikeimage1.jpeg
Aletes 


On May 19, 2019, at 10:27 AM, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

<IMG_20190312_112250625.jpg>My thinking was that the other 3 windlass bolts were secured by large fillets to the floor and supported by the floor joint to the vertical divider. I just created a 4th fillet for the back starboard bolt that also served as a header for my 4 inch Pvc. This piece is secured under the windlass by 7 screws and 5200. It fits inside the 4 inch Pvc and allows access to the back starboard windlass bolt because the bolt goes through the header plate. 


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Thomas Kleman
 

This is my fillet/header....note the back starboard windlass bolt. 4 inch Pvc works. Despite the appearance, I used silicone to seal the header to pvc joint and supported the PVC from below with my flange ring .I can remove the PVC easily if it ever needs replacement.


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Thomas Kleman
 

My thinking was that the other 3 windlass bolts were secured by large fillets to the floor and supported by the floor joint to the vertical divider. I just created a 4th fillet for the back starboard bolt that also served as a header for my 4 inch Pvc. This piece is secured under the windlass by 7 screws and 5200. It fits inside the 4 inch Pvc and allows access to the back starboard windlass bolt because the bolt goes through the header plate. 


Windlass switch

Gregory Shea
 

I need to change out the switch on my Lofrans Tigres windlass. I have the switch but how do you remove the rubber (?) boot that protects the switch. From the parts diagram it looks like it unscrews but that didn’t seem to work. Suggestions?

greg Shea 
Sharki 133 Cap des Iles
cuttently at Preveza


Re: Seagull spigot (things that make you go hmmm)

 

Possibly the filter requires 10-20 minutes of flow to flush out preservatives. Most do. Did you do this?

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Yacht School - Supporting Amel Owners
www.YachtSchool.us
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sat, May 18, 2019, 6:56 PM Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Hi Thomas,

my understanding has both readings well within acceptable limits

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl


On 19 May 2019 at 10:49 Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

Never thought to do this before (and wish I hadn't). Test of galley faucet water- 187 ppm (tank filled from watermaker only), test of seagull spigot with 1 week old filter- 210 ppm. And those filters aren't cheap. Two different meters confirmed this as did switching the meters.


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Mike Ondra
 

Hi Tom. The bolt you’re talking about screws into a steel plate embedded in the fiberglass. That plate is I believe welded to the hawse pipe to transfer load to the hawse pipe.. With the rusting out of the hawse pipe the plate also rusted and broke away the fiberglass encasement. It is highly compromised.

The structural load from the windlass is transferred to the hawse pipe and ultimately resolved down to the Locker floor and then over to the vertical divider between the two bow lockers as the primary structural resistance. Therefore our thought is to utilize an L-shaped steel strap bolted directly to the vertical divider between the bow lockers to receive the windlass bolt and thereby transferred load directly from the bolt to the vertical divider.
image1.jpeg
We do need to remember that the forces on these bolts are limited by the power of the windlass motor. Actual anchoring loads should be directed to the big cleat or with bridle to the port and starboard bow cleats.

Having directed the loads directly to the vertical panel The hawse pipe no longer takes the structural load. Our next step with this is to find a piece of pipe PVC plumbing pipe or PVC conduit that will slip over the stubs of the old hawse pipe that we left behind. I will follow up after doing so.
Mike 
Aletes SM240

On May 18, 2019, at 6:36 PM, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

Hey mike- cool pics....question for you. Are all 4 of your windlass bolts accessible or is the back starboard bolt glassed over ? Wondering why not just replace the whole hawse pipe and make your header for it also a lip for the back starboard bolt ?


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Mike Ondra
 

Hi Gary. Here are some pictures of the hawse pipe. With scale. Note how rotted out the steel pipe was.
Mike
Aletes SM#240

On May 19, 2019, at 12:44 AM, Gary Silver via Groups.Io <garysilver@...> wrote:

Hi Mike, Looking good.  Could you provide the ID (inside diameter) of the Amel hawse pipe?
image3.jpeg
Thanks,image2.jpeg

Gary S. Silverimage1.jpeg
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 # 335


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Gary Silver
 

Hi Mike, Looking good.  Could you provide the ID (inside diameter) of the Amel hawse pipe?

Thanks,

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 # 335


Re: Seagull spigot (things that make you go hmmm)

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Thomas,

my understanding has both readings well within acceptable limits

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl


On 19 May 2019 at 10:49 Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

Never thought to do this before (and wish I hadn't). Test of galley faucet water- 187 ppm (tank filled from watermaker only), test of seagull spigot with 1 week old filter- 210 ppm. And those filters aren't cheap. Two different meters confirmed this as did switching the meters.


Seagull spigot (things that make you go hmmm)

Thomas Kleman
 

Never thought to do this before (and wish I hadn't). Test of galley faucet water- 187 ppm (tank filled from watermaker only), test of seagull spigot with 1 week old filter- 210 ppm. And those filters aren't cheap. Two different meters confirmed this as did switching the meters.


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Thomas Kleman
 

Hey mike- cool pics....question for you. Are all 4 of your windlass bolts accessible or is the back starboard bolt glassed over ? Wondering why not just replace the whole hawse pipe and make your header for it also a lip for the back starboard bolt ?


Re: Bow locker floors/hawse pipe replacement project recap

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Do preventing maintenance.
Apply penetrating epoxy on the bottom and epoxy paint on top.
I jump in the locker. It is solid.

Vladimir
S/V "Life is Good"
SM2000 345.

On Sat, May 18, 2019, 10:14 AM Thomas Kleman <lorient422@... wrote:
Hey Gary. I made a header out of fiberglass with a wide lip (to seat the back starboard windlass bolt). I glued and screwed the header under the windlass. The header lip fits 2 inches inside the 4 inch Pvc so no leaks. The PVC is siliconed to the header (it can be removed if necessary). In the chain locker ceiling , a flange holds the PVC up and I added a thick ring of starboard to protect the bottom of flange from chain banging. So, I can access windlass bolts easily and remove and replace my hawse pipe without dealing with cutting fiberglass and 5200. And it drains without leaks past my double glassed 3/4 inch locker floor.


Now locker floor replacement

Mike Ondra
 

In the midst of Bow locker floor replacement. See attached photos. Plywood bottom was rotting and delaminating resulting in failure of the port locker. It was cut out to within 3 inches of the perimeter. Strategy is replacement plywood to be laid on top of the remaining flange and glassed in. Using half-inch plywood as original but with with some rib reinforcing underneath to allow enough structural support for opening access. Glassing both sides.
House pipe cut off below top and above bottom. Plan is to slide a PVC pipe over top of the existing house pipe flanges and glass it in for structural integrity. At least that’s the plan so far.
Mike
Aletes SM#240


Re: Bow locker floors/hawse pipe replacement project recap

Thomas Kleman
 

Hey Gary. I made a header out of fiberglass with a wide lip (to seat the back starboard windlass bolt). I glued and screwed the header under the windlass. The header lip fits 2 inches inside the 4 inch Pvc so no leaks. The PVC is siliconed to the header (it can be removed if necessary). In the chain locker ceiling , a flange holds the PVC up and I added a thick ring of starboard to protect the bottom of flange from chain banging. So, I can access windlass bolts easily and remove and replace my hawse pipe without dealing with cutting fiberglass and 5200. And it drains without leaks past my double glassed 3/4 inch locker floor.


Re: Bow-thruster

Craig Briggs
 

As Yogi Berra said, "You can observe a lot by looking around."


Bow-thruster

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hello all,

Eureka!

The leak was not the Bow Thruster
after all. I got in there this morning whilst underway having wiped it all dry. There was 10 knots of breeze and we were sailing nicely at 6 knots.
The leak is from the hatch drain, where it enters the BT glass box. As we pitched there was a drip. So I siliconed it and dried it all again. When we get in tomorrow I will be able to confirm.
Nick
Amelia in passage to Ibiza
AML54-019