Date   
Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: AGM battery equalisation

Jay Perry
 

Some info here

And here


Also to prolong the life of batteries increase the size of the bank so your daily discharge is a lower percentage of the banks capacity. Example if you use 100ah per day (charge cycle) then you need a power supply of around 500ah so you only use 20% of the total capacity, never running the batteries lower than 80%. 
This is why lead acid type batteries are not as cost effective over time as lithium, as lithium can be drained to 90% so you can use almost all or the amp hours you pay for.

(I’m an election engineer and Chief Technical Officer)

Jay Perry 

WHUATI - crew


On 10 Feb 2019, at 22:57, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Paul,


You might find some useful information about balancing batteries and why it is especially important for AGM's and GEL's here:  Battery Connections and Balancing

4 years is a good life span for flooded batteries, not bad (but not great) for AGMs.

AGM's are great batteries, but they are in some way more sensitive than flooded. If they are not brought up to full charge--often--they suffer.  Our AGM's lasted about 6.5 years, and were still OK, but we needed the reliability of a new bank so we upgraded them.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Georgetown, Bahamas

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: AGM battery equalisation

Jay Perry
 

The low voltage batteries are probably end of life, but have you tried equalizing the bank?

Jay

WHUATI - crew


On 10 Feb 2019, at 21:01, mfmcgovern@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Paul,


I'll throw in my 2 cents that it's time to start looking for new batteries.  4.5 years is a pretty good run especially if you have spent a lot of time at anchor and therefore have lots of discharge/charge cycles.  

Regarding trying to equalize the batteries, check the documentation of your specific batteries.  Most AGM batteries DO NOT recommend equalizing with the notable exception of Lifeline AGM batteries.  

The battery with 12.3 volts is gone.  Keeping that damaged battery in the bank is doing you more harm than good right now and actually can be a danger as it is likely getting quite hot when charging as well as venting excessive amounts of hydrogen gas.  If I were you I would immediately take out that battery as well as the worst of the remaining 11 and run with 5 pairs instead of 6 until you can replace the entire bank.

If you just replace the bad battery with a new one, that battery will have significantly more capacity than all the rest of your "old" batteries.  But your charger does not know that so when your "old" batteries are full, the new one won't even be close to full.  So you will be chronically undercharging the new battery leading to iot's premature failure AND you will be overcharging the old batteries at the same time leading to excess heat and venting of gas.

Regarding "balancing out the voltages" of the remaining batteries, my understanding from my research is that in a Series-Parallel battery bank it is more important that the voltages of the 12V batteries that are connected in Series to make each 24V battery are matched as closely as possible.

See this article:  https://www.coastalclimatecontrol.com/index.php/blog/192-a-true-balancing-act-battery-equalizing.html  There are products on the market called Battery Balancers whose purpose is to monitor these differences and modify the charge current sent to each battery to ensure that each gets fully charged such as this one:  https://www.victronenergy.com/upload/documents/Datasheet-Battery-Balancer-EN.pdf    

So in your case, you said that you have the following voltages in your 12 batteries:

12.7 12.6 12.5 12.5 12.6 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.3

I would disconnect the 12.3 and the lowest of the 12.5 batteries and then make the following set of five (5) 24V batteries connected in Parallel:

[12.7 12.7]
[12.6 12.6] 
[12.5 12.5] 
[12.6 12.6] 
[12.5 12.6]   


Last, I am NOT an electrical engineer nor a battery expert.  Most of what I know about deep cycle batteries comes from reading these sites:  https://marinehowto.com/under-load-battery-voltage-vs-soc/ and https://batteryuniversity.com/ and https://www.coastalclimatecontrol.com/index.php/blog.html.  They are full of great information to help you decide how best to proceed.  Good luck!

Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

SM2K yanmar startup issues

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi all,

A question in behalf of a friend with a SM2K from 2002 equiped with a Yanmar 100HP 4JHTE. 

Randomly, turning the key won’t run the starter motor. 
What has been established and done so far:

The battery negative connection relay, when manually reset with the button underneath it, sometimes helps the matter. 
The same relay, when manually activated while the key is turned always fixes the issue. 
The relay was therefore incriminated and changed but the random issue remained. 

All electrical connections between the cockpit panel and the starter motor were cleaned. 

There seems to be a second relay that drives the the first one. We are a bit confused by that setup.

Independently (or not?), there seems to be an issue with the shutdown process too. Sometimes the manual “kill cord” needs to be used. 

Anyone familiar with those issues? Any further tips?


Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Panama


Re: Hair in macerate pump

greatketch@...
 

Kent,

NO to Liquid Plumber or any other "drain cleaners"!  They are concentrated Sodium hydroxide (caustic soda or lye)  and very bad for many for the various bits and pieces in your downstream piping.

As unpleasant as it is, mechanical cleaning is the only safe solution here.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Georgetown, Bahamas

Re: Hair in macerate pump

greatketch@...
 

Kent,

NO to Liquid Plumber or any other "drain cleaners"!  They are concentrated Sodium hydroxide (caustic soda or lye)  and very bad for many for the various bits and pieces in your downstream piping.

As unpleasant as it is, mechanical cleaning is the only safe solution here.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Georgetown, Bahamas

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: AGM battery equalisation

greatketch@...
 

Paul,

You might find some useful information about balancing batteries and why it is especially important for AGM's and GEL's here:  Battery Connections and Balancing

4 years is a good life span for flooded batteries, not bad (but not great) for AGMs.

AGM's are great batteries, but they are in some way more sensitive than flooded. If they are not brought up to full charge--often--they suffer.  Our AGM's lasted about 6.5 years, and were still OK, but we needed the reliability of a new bank so we upgraded them.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Georgetown, Bahamas

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: AGM battery equalisation

greatketch@...
 

Paul,

You might find some useful information about balancing batteries and why it is especially important for AGM's and GEL's here:  Battery Connections and Balancing

4 years is a good life span for flooded batteries, not bad (but not great) for AGMs.

AGM's are great batteries, but they are in some way more sensitive than flooded. If they are not brought up to full charge--often--they suffer.  Our AGM's lasted about 6.5 years, and were still OK, but we needed the reliability of a new bank so we upgraded them.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Georgetown, Bahamas

Re: AGM battery equalisation

mfmcgovern@...
 

Paul,

I'll throw in my 2 cents that it's time to start looking for new batteries.  4.5 years is a pretty good run especially if you have spent a lot of time at anchor and therefore have lots of discharge/charge cycles.  

Regarding trying to equalize the batteries, check the documentation of your specific batteries.  Most AGM batteries DO NOT recommend equalizing with the notable exception of Lifeline AGM batteries.  

The battery with 12.3 volts is gone.  Keeping that damaged battery in the bank is doing you more harm than good right now and actually can be a danger as it is likely getting quite hot when charging as well as venting excessive amounts of hydrogen gas.  If I were you I would immediately take out that battery as well as the worst of the remaining 11 and run with 5 pairs instead of 6 until you can replace the entire bank.

If you just replace the bad battery with a new one, that battery will have significantly more capacity than all the rest of your "old" batteries.  But your charger does not know that so when your "old" batteries are full, the new one won't even be close to full.  So you will be chronically undercharging the new battery leading to iot's premature failure AND you will be overcharging the old batteries at the same time leading to excess heat and venting of gas.

Regarding "balancing out the voltages" of the remaining batteries, my understanding from my research is that in a Series-Parallel battery bank it is more important that the voltages of the 12V batteries that are connected in Series to make each 24V battery are matched as closely as possible.

See this article:  https://www.coastalclimatecontrol.com/index.php/blog/192-a-true-balancing-act-battery-equalizing.html  There are products on the market called Battery Balancers whose purpose is to monitor these differences and modify the charge current sent to each battery to ensure that each gets fully charged such as this one:  https://www.victronenergy.com/upload/documents/Datasheet-Battery-Balancer-EN.pdf    

So in your case, you said that you have the following voltages in your 12 batteries:

12.7 12.6 12.5 12.5 12.6 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.3

I would disconnect the 12.3 and the lowest of the 12.5 batteries and then make the following set of five (5) 24V batteries connected in Parallel:

[12.7 12.7]
[12.6 12.6] 
[12.5 12.5] 
[12.6 12.6] 
[12.5 12.6]   


Last, I am NOT an electrical engineer nor a battery expert.  Most of what I know about deep cycle batteries comes from reading these sites:  https://marinehowto.com/under-load-battery-voltage-vs-soc/ and https://batteryuniversity.com/ and https://www.coastalclimatecontrol.com/index.php/blog.html.  They are full of great information to help you decide how best to proceed.  Good luck!

Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hair in macerate pump

ngtnewington Newington
 

I have threatened the family that they must all shave their heads……….

Hair gets everywhere!!! I have two teenage daughters, and a wife all with long blond hair. It is a mystery to me too, but just cleaning the floor through to boat yields a ton of hair! I think the advice to close the loo lid is good..
Nick Amelia (Aml 54 019)

On 10 Feb 2019, at 17:35, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hmmm,

 

I’m seriously confused. How is hair making its way to the inside of the toilets? If it is causing a problem wouldn’t the easiest solution be not to put it in there to begin with.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AGM battery equalisation

ngtnewington Newington
 

Paul,

On my last boat I got nearly 10 years from my battery bank AGM’s and it was only because I left a lamp on and forgot to turn off the power when I left the boat for two weeks that they died. The lamp was not LED and there was no wind….…but I was not cruising full time. When not on the boat it was generally hauled out and the wind generator kept the bank at 100% for months at a time. On average I spent 4 months of the year aboard, rarely in marinas. The trick is to never discharge the bank below 60% but more importantly to bring it to 100% every week. This not easily done unless connected to shore power which is why solar and/or wind is so important. It really is as simple as that….the new generation of AGM’s (Firefly carbon foam) are supposed to tolerate the normal cruising lifestyle better and can be discharged lower, accept charge faster and do not suffer as badly. Reports are good but they are not readily available….it seams to me that changing 12 batteries every three years is crazy and expensive and  not very eco….to be avoided. Really the answer is to get the bank up to 100% every day or two and have enough solar or whatever to break-even on a day to day basis. My philosophy is to have a smaller bank of 8 batteries but to have enough solar and wind power so that the bank would only discharge at night and be topped off every day or so. Occasionally if cloudy and calm then some generating would have to be done…. or move anchorage and motor!! I also am careful to turn off inverters when not in use and come from the old school so am a bit of an AMP watcher. I guess it is interesting to see where the amps go. On the 54 I turn off the SSB breaker that powers the 24v:12v converters and also turn off most instruments when not actually being used. I have converted all the lamps to LED and in general turn stuff off.

Nick 

Amelia (Aml 54 019)

On 10 Feb 2019, at 17:38, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Paul,

I believe that the 12.3 battery has failed. The 12.5 batteries are nearing the same point, with probably less than 1 year. 

I would disconnect the pair that has the 12.3 and move things so that one of the 12.5 batteries is also disconnected. In other words, 1 pair of the worst batteries are disconnected from the bank. Then I would start looking for the best place to buy and replace all of the batteries. I am going to guess that you should do this within about 6-8 months.

I am sure that you will find some owner that gets longer than 4 years life, but I will assure you he is not discharging his batteries at anchor as you are. I met a guy in Turkey who according to him got 12 years life from his batteries. Within 5 minutes of leaving the marina, they failed.😀

Best,

Bill Rouse
Amel School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 10:32 AM sharongbrown@...[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

First, many thanks for all your advice, it is much appreciated. I have 6 pairs for my 24v system. The pairs and voltages, after being fully charged (i.e. drawing 1A) and left disconnected for 12 hours, are as follows:

12.7 12.6 12.5 12.5 12.6 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.3

(I did that in two separate lots of 6 each so as to maintain power to the boat)

I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you mean balancing out the voltages. What do you think I should do with the one at 12.3v? Get rid of it, or pair it up with something else? 

Understood about 3-4 year expected life although I was hoping it may be a bit longer!

Cheers,
Paul



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: AGM battery equalisation

Jay Perry
 

Batteries from time to time should be equalized and most battery chargers can do this.
Another way to stop the need for this so often is to have every battery in a bank connected with the same thickness and length of cable to the charger cable, regardless if the cable need to be that long and connect all to a centralized buzz bar. This is to have the same resistance across all the batteries in the same bank.
However as mentioned lead acid, gel, AGM all use acid and have a maximum number of charge cycles. Yet after just 20 to 30 % of the maximum cycles (usually around 1 year) they will be less than 50% efficient at holding charge.
For batteries to last 5 to 10 years you would need to look at alternatives like lithium.

Regards 
Jay Perry

WHUATI - crew


On 10 Feb 2019, at 19:38, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Paul,

I believe that the 12.3 battery has failed. The 12.5 batteries are nearing the same point, with probably less than 1 year. 

I would disconnect the pair that has the 12.3 and move things so that one of the 12.5 batteries is also disconnected. In other words, 1 pair of the worst batteries are disconnected from the bank. Then I would start looking for the best place to buy and replace all of the batteries. I am going to guess that you should do this within about 6-8 months.

I am sure that you will find some owner that gets longer than 4 years life, but I will assure you he is not discharging his batteries at anchor as you are. I met a guy in Turkey who according to him got 12 years life from his batteries. Within 5 minutes of leaving the marina, they failed.😀

Best,

Bill Rouse
Amel School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970



On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 10:32 AM sharongbrown@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

First, many thanks for all your advice, it is much appreciated. I have 6 pairs for my 24v system. The pairs and voltages, after being fully charged (i.e. drawing 1A) and left disconnected for 12 hours, are as follows:

12.7 12.6 12.5 12.5 12.6 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.3

(I did that in two separate lots of 6 each so as to maintain power to the boat)

I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you mean balancing out the voltages. What do you think I should do with the one at 12.3v? Get rid of it, or pair it up with something else?

Understood about 3-4 year expected life although I was hoping it may be a bit longer!

Cheers,
Paul

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hair in macerate pump

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Kent,

I had an old  screwdriver and I cut the handle down to a butt. Worked well. Also you can buy stumpy screw drivers. When you reassemble be sure to coat the screws with lanacote (for next time) and perhaps coach the owner of the long hair not to clean the hair brush or comb into the toilet bowl, it works OK at home into the sewage system but not on a boat, likewise dental floss. Also close the lid on the head at all times when not in use, brushing hair can release strays. Prevention is a whole lot easier than cure.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 11 February 2019 at 06:12 "karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,
I had to replace a macerator pump. It had long hair wrapped around the shaft. We were wondering if anybody has used liquid plumber periodically in their toilets to dissolve hair?

I am concerned that it might not be good for the seals and/other head parts..

I haven’t been doing any maintenance on the heads, just flush with fresh water and treat with SewClean once a year. The pumps last about two years and I’ve been replacing them when they go bad.. Do you pull the pumps off regularly for cleaning, replacing seals, other? If so, what do you do and kind of life do they have? I find it very difficult to remove the pumps without removing the bowl, no place to get a screwdriver on the bottom two bolts. Any tricks?

Thanks,
Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243


 


 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: AGM battery equalisation

 

Paul,

I believe that the 12.3 battery has failed. The 12.5 batteries are nearing the same point, with probably less than 1 year. 

I would disconnect the pair that has the 12.3 and move things so that one of the 12.5 batteries is also disconnected. In other words, 1 pair of the worst batteries are disconnected from the bank. Then I would start looking for the best place to buy and replace all of the batteries. I am going to guess that you should do this within about 6-8 months.

I am sure that you will find some owner that gets longer than 4 years life, but I will assure you he is not discharging his batteries at anchor as you are. I met a guy in Turkey who according to him got 12 years life from his batteries. Within 5 minutes of leaving the marina, they failed.😀

Best,

Bill Rouse
Amel School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970



On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 10:32 AM sharongbrown@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

First, many thanks for all your advice, it is much appreciated. I have 6 pairs for my 24v system. The pairs and voltages, after being fully charged (i.e. drawing 1A) and left disconnected for 12 hours, are as follows:

12.7 12.6 12.5 12.5 12.6 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.3

(I did that in two separate lots of 6 each so as to maintain power to the boat)

I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you mean balancing out the voltages. What do you think I should do with the one at 12.3v? Get rid of it, or pair it up with something else?

Understood about 3-4 year expected life although I was hoping it may be a bit longer!

Cheers,
Paul

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hair in macerate pump

Mark Erdos
 

Hmmm,

 

I’m seriously confused. How is hair making its way to the inside of the toilets? If it is causing a problem wouldn’t the easiest solution be not to put it in there to begin with.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hair in macerate pump

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Kent and Iris,

I am afraid that the dreaded job of regularly de-hairing the macerator pump is on my list of preventative to do’s. It is not too bad if one pumps through plenty of clean water before! Caustic soda will dissolve hair and many other things but it is dangerous stuff. I use it in the main bilge about once a month as it is a great de-greaser, but for the head macerators I find it pretty quick and easy to take them off manually, clean and put them back with a small amount of silicon grease on the rubber seal. It really is a five to ten minute job.

Nick
S/Y Amelia 

On 10 Feb 2019, at 17:12, karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I had to replace a macerator pump. It had long hair wrapped around the shaft. We were wondering if anybody has used liquid plumber periodically in their toilets to dissolve hair?

I am concerned that it might not be good for the seals and/other head parts..

I haven’t been doing any maintenance on the heads, just flush with fresh water and treat with SewClean once a year. The pumps last about two years and I’ve been replacing them when they go bad.. Do you pull the pumps off regularly for cleaning, replacing seals, other? If so, what do you do and kind of life do they have? I find it very difficult to remove the pumps without removing the bowl, no place to get a screwdriver on the bottom two bolts. Any tricks?

Thanks,
Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hair in macerate pump

 

Kent,

Maybe you should read what we gave those people visiting our boat. It is posted on BeBe's blog at https://svbebe.blogspot.com/p/visitors-to-bebe.html

The important part is: 
  • NOTHING GOES IN THE TOILETS BUT WHAT COMES OUT OF YOUR BODY and the appropriate toilet paper. – no feminine products, gum – not even a matchstick. And, most importantly, NO HAIR.......not one single strand!!! Our toilets are equipped with a macerator (kind of like a tiny blender blade) that is activated every time the 'flush' button is depressed. The macerator cuts all waste matter and paper into tiny bits before it is dumped into the holding tank. It is very important to depress the 'flush' button for a minimum of 12 seconds. Our toilet system flushes with sea water. Urine and salt water combine to form rock-hard 'crystals' that will block the discharge hoses; so it is very important to flush long enough to evacuate all urine from the discharge hoses and into the holding tank. Strands of hair wrap around the macerator blades and stop the flushing action. This is a very nasty job to clean and will break the macerator. Bill will not be very happy with you if he has to take apart the sewer line to clean up your mistake.
You may not have the optimum length screwdriver. I had one that fit perfectly and used it to do this job at least 6 or 7 times. You can buy a screwdriver with a flexible shaft. That would probably be the easiest way to do it.

Best,

Bill Rouse
Amel School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970



On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 11:12 AM karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,
I had to replace a macerator pump. It had long hair wrapped around the shaft. We were wondering if anybody has used liquid plumber periodically in their toilets to dissolve hair?

I am concerned that it might not be good for the seals and/other head parts..

I haven’t been doing any maintenance on the heads, just flush with fresh water and treat with SewClean once a year. The pumps last about two years and I’ve been replacing them when they go bad.. Do you pull the pumps off regularly for cleaning, replacing seals, other? If so, what do you do and kind of life do they have? I find it very difficult to remove the pumps without removing the bowl, no place to get a screwdriver on the bottom two bolts. Any tricks?

Thanks,
Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243

Hair in macerate pump

karkauai
 

Hi all,
I had to replace a macerator pump. It had long hair wrapped around the shaft. We were wondering if anybody has used liquid plumber periodically in their toilets to dissolve hair?

I am concerned that it might not be good for the seals and/other head parts.

I haven’t been doing any maintenance on the heads, just flush with fresh water and treat with SewClean once a year. The pumps last about two years and I’ve been replacing them when they go bad.. Do you pull the pumps off regularly for cleaning, replacing seals, other? If so, what do you do and kind of life do they have? I find it very difficult to remove the pumps without removing the bowl, no place to get a screwdriver on the bottom two bolts. Any tricks?

Thanks,
Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: AGM battery equalisation

ya_fohi
 

First, many thanks for all your advice, it is much appreciated. I have 6 pairs for my 24v system. The pairs and voltages, after being fully charged (i.e. drawing 1A) and left disconnected for 12 hours, are as follows:

12.7 12.6 12.5 12.5 12.6 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.3

(I did that in two separate lots of 6 each so as to maintain power to the boat)

I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you mean balancing out the voltages. What do you think I should do with the one at 12.3v? Get rid of it, or pair it up with something else?

Understood about 3-4 year expected life although I was hoping it may be a bit longer!

Cheers,
Paul

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Any Amel owners who have sailed to Chile from Panama?

karkauai
 

Hi John,
Glad to hear from you.  You headed back N?  We’ll be inT&C for a few weeks, then heading S.

Not sure how we missed you.  We had a great weather window out of Ft L.  Motor sailed for about 6 hours on a light wind beam reach, then beam reach in 12-15 kts for the rest of the trip as the wind clocked from N to NE S we made the turn S.  Only took 3 days and had to slow down then heave to so we could enter in good light.

Have fun, be safe.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Feb 5, 2019, at 4:55 AM, John Clark john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Don't know about Chile but we jutst passed you leaving the Turks and Caicos.  We were off in the distance to your east.  Spotted your boat and thought she was an Amel...my eye is still good I see.

Regards,  John
SV Annie SM 37
Transiting the Bahamas.

On Sun, Jan 27, 2019, 2:25 PM jamescromie@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... wrote:
 

Hello everyone - 

I'm interested to know if there are any Amel owners who have sailed to Southern Chile from Panama along the Pacific coast of South America.  If so, I'd love to hear about your experience.   


Many thanks!

-James

Soteria

#347

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

Wolfgang Weber
 

This is my Forespar LC 15-27-UTS-UTR Alu telescope boom we use for the Gennacker, the 6,80 m Amel boom on the other side for the genua.Holders at the reling are homemade, holder at mast combination of Forespare part and parts from Internet. 
Wolfgang Weber SY Elise Amel 54#162

Thank you all for the dinghy recommendations