Date   

Re: Toilet flooding when sailing

Paul Osterberg
 

The strange thing is that the water s clear. so I'm suspicious could it come through the salt water flushing pump does not make sens to me but... 
Paul


Re: Toilet flooding when sailing

Mark Erdos
 

Paul,

 

While you are underway and the holding tank valve is open, sea water can push upward. This will cause added pressure in the tank and the air pressure in the tank will put backward pressure on your joker valve. You can either close the holding tank valve or replace the joker valve to solve your problem.

 

I am assuming the water in the toilet is smelly. The only other path for water is from the flush. It might be possible to have the contents of the flush hose empty into the toilet. This would be a one-time event until the toilet is flushed again. This can be solved by using the empty bowl option on the rocker switch and not putting more water into the hose.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul Osterberg
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 12:27 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Toilet flooding when sailing

 

Thank you Mark, i do not think that's the problem as after flushing, the water in the hose do not flow back to the bowl, and even if that would be the malfunction part it should not come in more water that is in the hose itself.
Paul


Re: New sails

Ian Townsend
 

We have both main and mizzen sails made by Incidences, new in 2013. I do not like the cut on the mainsail. It is  short of the masthead by over 30 cm (even with the foot raised). Mizzen is fine. And a small but annoying thing is the "Incidences" patch on both sails. They are not colour fast. The blue ink has leeched down onto the sail fabric. 

Ian & Margaret
S/V Loca Lola II 
SM153
Exumas, Bahamas

On May 21, 2019, at 12:32 PM, Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote:

We are in the market for new sails, and got a reasonable offer from Incidence sails in France made in Hydranet. They do not use foam luff which surprise me they claim and they should now. So to my question. Is there any of you who recently bought sails from Incidence? what is your experience with the sails? especially the head sails does it furl/reef well?
I guess they have a lot of experience in building/making sails for Amel SM
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


Re: Cables in SM Mast

Paul Osterberg
 

I changed our wind transducer last spring, it was very easy to pull the cable, our mast was down, but I guess that would not cause any problem to pull the cable with the mast in place. What we notice when in Sassafras River Chesapeake bay, was that it was a missive amounts of spiders invading the boat and built nests. One of the nest was somewhere in the mast, I thought the halyard was jammed but a firm pull and it came lose and something locking as a spider nest fell down on deck. birds and other animals also build nests and that can be a reason for the problem to pull out the cable
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


New sails

Paul Osterberg
 

We are in the market for new sails, and got a reasonable offer from Incidence sails in France made in Hydranet. They do not use foam luff which surprise me they claim and they should now. So to my question. Is there any of you who recently bought sails from Incidence? what is your experience with the sails? especially the head sails does it furl/reef well?
I guess they have a lot of experience in building/making sails for Amel SM
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


Re: Toilet flooding when sailing

Paul Osterberg
 

Thank you Mark, i do not think that's the problem as after flushing, the water in the hose do not flow back to the bowl, and even if that would be the malfunction part it should not come in more water that is in the hose itself.
Paul


Cables in SM Mast

Derick Gates
 

Raymaine in the Azores is attempting to exchange the wind direction and speed cable on Brava. They are having difficulty pulling the old cable up. Are the cables all cabletied together? Do we need o disconnect and pull all of the cables at the same time?

They also are encountering a barrier about 2 meters down from the top of the mast when trying to put a new wire in place without removing the old wire. Did Amel run the cables through a pipe at certain points? 

Any knowledge would be appreciated. 

Derick Gates
Amel Super Maramu #400
Brava
+1(617)512-8834 cell


Re: Toilet flooding when sailing

Mark Erdos
 

Paul,

 

You probably need to replace the joker valve on the head. It is located past the pump but before the hose leading to the holding tank. You should find 3 screws there to access the valve. This is the valve that stops water flowing backward into the head.

 

joker valve.jpg.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul Osterberg
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:05 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Toilet flooding when sailing

 

We have noticed a strange ingress of water in our forward head bowl, when sailing with the wind in from SB, if there is any water left in the bowl, the bowl slowly fills with water, usually smal amount when the boats goes down in a wave or other vivid motion. If the bowl is totally empty no water coming in! I have no explanation to the behavior.  We have similar on the aft toilet but to much less extent. We always have the valve for emptying the holding tank open when at sea. but can't imagine how water can get in that way
Paul on SY Kerpa SM #259


Toilet flooding when sailing

Paul Osterberg
 

We have noticed a strange ingress of water in our forward head bowl, when sailing with the wind in from SB, if there is any water left in the bowl, the bowl slowly fills with water, usually smal amount when the boats goes down in a wave or other vivid motion. If the bowl is totally empty no water coming in! I have no explanation to the behavior.  We have similar on the aft toilet but to much less extent. We always have the valve for emptying the holding tank open when at sea. but can't imagine how water can get in that way
Paul on SY Kerpa SM #259


Re: Tidbits

Ian Park
 

I knew the steerboard origin but not all of the rest. Thanks Mark, I am going to copy and save that.
Ocean Hobo is currently anchored off Siel Island in Scotland - in the sun. We’re currently with the OCC Celtic Cruise with Bill And Laurie on Toodle Ooh.

Best wishes

Ian and Linda


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Gerald Bassin
 

Nice job !
On our SM #113 Jetlag, we managed to load up 100 gallons of water on the passage from Curaçao to Grenada due to a blocked drain in the chain locker.... We had a hatch already fitted in the port locker so it was not to hard to get down and cut an acces to the drain hole. Works fine now. We also installed a divider in the chain locker. Seems that the earlier units did not have it installed
Safe sailing
Gerald Bassin 
SV Jetlag


On 21 May 2019, at 02:13, Mike Ondra via Groups.Io <mdondra@...> wrote:

Aletes locker drain was also blocked. Pushing a fish (wire puller) up the drain pipe from the T in the foreword head bilge broke it loose. Water gushed out along with the mud and sand. Hose pressure through the holes in the anchor locker floor cleaned out the rest. 

Key to this was the access now afforded      through the port bow locker floor now completed. 

Mike Ondra
Aletes SM240
<image1.jpeg>


On May 19, 2019, at 5:51 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hi Gang,

I solved the problem by always using the chain wash (now fresh water on our boat) and at least once a year… doing a pressure wash in the chain well compartment.

Cheers from Fiji.

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007


On 20 May 2019, at 09:45, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

Mike- your floor looks great. I know how hard it is to cut and refine that shape. On L'ORIENT my chain locker bilge (under that glassed in perforated grate at the bottom of the chain locker) was hoplessly clogged. I ended up cutting an access port in it so I could vacuum it out periodically.....it drains fine now Wondering if other people have this problem or I just pick muddier places to anchor than most.....the actual outlet underneath there is about 15mm above the bottom and offset.


Re: Now locker floor replacement

eric freedman
 

Very nice work,

Congratulations.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ondra via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 8:14 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Now locker floor replacement

 

Aletes locker drain was also blocked. Pushing a fish (wire puller) up the drain pipe from the T in the foreword head bilge broke it loose. Water gushed out along with the mud and sand. Hose pressure through the holes in the anchor locker floor cleaned out the rest. 

 

Key to this was the access now afforded      through the port bow locker floor now completed. 

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM240

image1.jpeg


On May 19, 2019, at 5:51 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hi Gang,

 

I solved the problem by always using the chain wash (now fresh water on our boat) and at least once a year… doing a pressure wash in the chain well compartment.

 

Cheers from Fiji.

 

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007

 



On 20 May 2019, at 09:45, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

 

Mike- your floor looks great. I know how hard it is to cut and refine that shape. On L'ORIENT my chain locker bilge (under that glassed in perforated grate at the bottom of the chain locker) was hoplessly clogged. I ended up cutting an access port in it so I could vacuum it out periodically.....it drains fine now Wondering if other people have this problem or I just pick muddier places to anchor than most.....the actual outlet underneath there is about 15mm above the bottom and offset.

 


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Mike Ondra
 

Aletes locker drain was also blocked. Pushing a fish (wire puller) up the drain pipe from the T in the foreword head bilge broke it loose. Water gushed out along with the mud and sand. Hose pressure through the holes in the anchor locker floor cleaned out the rest. 

Key to this was the access now afforded      through the port bow locker floor now completed. 

Mike Ondra
Aletes SM240
image1.jpeg


On May 19, 2019, at 5:51 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hi Gang,

I solved the problem by always using the chain wash (now fresh water on our boat) and at least once a year… doing a pressure wash in the chain well compartment.

Cheers from Fiji.

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007


On 20 May 2019, at 09:45, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

Mike- your floor looks great. I know how hard it is to cut and refine that shape. On L'ORIENT my chain locker bilge (under that glassed in perforated grate at the bottom of the chain locker) was hoplessly clogged. I ended up cutting an access port in it so I could vacuum it out periodically.....it drains fine now Wondering if other people have this problem or I just pick muddier places to anchor than most.....the actual outlet underneath there is about 15mm above the bottom and offset.


Re: Tidbits

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Nice one Mark!! Sorry we missed meeting you guys by not very far. We came through Panama two weeks ago and are now in Ecuador.
Best regards
Colin & Lauren on SV Island Pearl II, sm#332

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 3:02 PM Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

(not sure where I found this so as to give credit where due)

 

 

Ever wonder where the terms port (left) and starboard (right) came from?

 

Ships used to have their rudders affixed to the right side, and this was the side they steered from. 'Starboard' is a corruption of 'steorbord' or 'steer-board.' In fact, the word 'steer' comes from the Old Norse 'stýri' meaning rudder.

 

When pulling into port, ships approached with the land on their left side to avoid damaging the rudder. This is why that side is called 'port side.' It was originally called 'larboard,' derived from 'load-board' (the side you load cargo on), but they decided that the term sounded too similar to 'starboard' and changed it.

 

When two ships crossed paths, the one on the right side had the right-of-way (hence the name). Since ships often passed in the dark of night, they needed a way to determine the location and orientation of other vessels. So, they affixed a red light to left (port) side and a green light to the right (starboard) side.

 

If the red light of the other ship was visible, it meant that their left side was facing you, thus they were on the right, and that you should yield to them. If their green light was visible, then you were the one with the right-of-way. This is where we get our modern traffic signal colors: red means stop and green means go. This same color system is still used today on aircraft.

 

If you have trouble keeping it all straight, remember that port wine is red, and that there's never any left in the morning. Incidentally, port wine is named after the Portuguese seaport city of Porto, from which it was originally exported. All three of those uses of port that I just boldfaced are derived from the Latin word 'portus' meaning 'harbor.'

 

Now you know.

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Panama

www.creampuff.us

 



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Tidbits

Mark Erdos
 

(not sure where I found this so as to give credit where due)

 

 

Ever wonder where the terms port (left) and starboard (right) came from?

 

Ships used to have their rudders affixed to the right side, and this was the side they steered from. 'Starboard' is a corruption of 'steorbord' or 'steer-board.' In fact, the word 'steer' comes from the Old Norse 'stýri' meaning rudder.

 

When pulling into port, ships approached with the land on their left side to avoid damaging the rudder. This is why that side is called 'port side.' It was originally called 'larboard,' derived from 'load-board' (the side you load cargo on), but they decided that the term sounded too similar to 'starboard' and changed it.

 

When two ships crossed paths, the one on the right side had the right-of-way (hence the name). Since ships often passed in the dark of night, they needed a way to determine the location and orientation of other vessels. So, they affixed a red light to left (port) side and a green light to the right (starboard) side.

 

If the red light of the other ship was visible, it meant that their left side was facing you, thus they were on the right, and that you should yield to them. If their green light was visible, then you were the one with the right-of-way. This is where we get our modern traffic signal colors: red means stop and green means go. This same color system is still used today on aircraft.

 

If you have trouble keeping it all straight, remember that port wine is red, and that there's never any left in the morning. Incidentally, port wine is named after the Portuguese seaport city of Porto, from which it was originally exported. All three of those uses of port that I just boldfaced are derived from the Latin word 'portus' meaning 'harbor.'

 

Now you know.

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Panama

www.creampuff.us

 


Re: Marco UP6/E pump and MASS+ light

Alan Leslie
 

We have a Marco pump on Elyse and don't have it connected to the bonding system.
As I understand it the bonding system as far as pumps etc go is only applicable to those items in contact with salt water.
Regarding the 24V indicator panel light, we have the original wire connected to the red wire between the smart sensor and the pump.
The green light on the panel comes on when the pump cycles and goes off when it stops.
Our pump has been installed now for 2+ years and we have had no issues with it.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi Gang,

I solved the problem by always using the chain wash (now fresh water on our boat) and at least once a year… doing a pressure wash in the chain well compartment.

Cheers from Fiji.

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007


On 20 May 2019, at 09:45, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

Mike- your floor looks great. I know how hard it is to cut and refine that shape. On L'ORIENT my chain locker bilge (under that glassed in perforated grate at the bottom of the chain locker) was hoplessly clogged. I ended up cutting an access port in it so I could vacuum it out periodically.....it drains fine now. Wondering if other people have this problem or I just pick muddier places to anchor than most.....the actual outlet underneath there is about 15mm above the bottom and offset.


Re: Now locker floor replacement

Thomas Kleman
 

Mike- your floor looks great. I know how hard it is to cut and refine that shape. On L'ORIENT my chain locker bilge (under that glassed in perforated grate at the bottom of the chain locker) was hoplessly clogged. I ended up cutting an access port in it so I could vacuum it out periodically.....it drains fine now. Wondering if other people have this problem or I just pick muddier places to anchor than most.....the actual outlet underneath there is about 15mm above the bottom and offset.


Re: The two "sticks" on the genoa top swivel

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Mike,

a while back I posted a photo of a tongue that goes through the inner of the swivel and into the slot in the foil. This locates the center and prevents the scratching you mention. This tongue often wears through. A number of SM owners have found this. There is one important feature, which if missing allows this wear to occur. This is a nylon "pencil" that sits in the foil with a mating slot in it for this tongue. I believe this "pencil" is often lost when non Amel riggers are doing work. The tongue is secured by two grub screws easily accessed. I suggest you check for the tongue and the nylon pencil. I am picking you will find both missing.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 20 May 2019 at 03:14 SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:

Thanks everyone for the informative responses on this topic. We're having a new set of horns fabricated and plan to cover them with some hose material. Anything one can do to reduce halyard wraps, cuts, jams, etc. is certainly worthwhile.

On a side note, while up at the masthead I noticed the foil/extrusion was heavily scratched around it's circumference for several inches right where the top swivel would sit. Perhaps there's an issue with our top swivel and it should be taken apart and serviced? Although while at deck level it spins easily and sounds very smooth. Or maybe the threads on the one horn we had up there were too long and made contact with the foil while furling? Just wondering if anyone has ever seen anything similar on their boat. Sorry no photo at the moment but I'll try and get one.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV Trilogy, SM#23
Panama


On Mon, 13 May 2019, 08:05 Gary Wells, < gary@...> wrote:
A short piece of fuel line and some contact cement make good "caps" for those 'horns'.
Having experienced a halyard wrap up there once, I wouldn't consider running without them.
If you are doing regular maintenance on the swivel then it's far less likely the horns would touch the mast, but if the swivel jams even slightly the horns are the best defense against getting the halyard wrapped and broken at the masthead.  
Can't really explain how I discovered this.  :)

Gary W.
SM 209, "Adagio"
Beaufort, NC USA

 

 


Re: Windlass switch

Gregory Shea
 

Duane, 
That makes perfect sense. Tomorrow’s job, thanks. One dollar to do the hitting, 49 for knowing where to hit.

Greg Shea
Sharki 133 Cap des Iles
Currently at Preveza




On May 19, 2019, at 9:31 PM, Duane Siegfri via Groups.Io <carlylelk@...> wrote:

Greg,

I'm not sure from your question: are you trying to unscrew them from the outside of the casing?

If so you need to remove the nuts on the aft of the windlass aluminum cover, then slide the cover aft.  You'll find a nut on the inside of the case on the switch.  Remove the wires first, then the nut.  Make sure you use a good sealant that you can get apart later to make the switches watertight to the case.  

If the rubber boot you mention is the surface you press on, it has a lip that goes under the actual hard plastic switch that lies beneath.  You'll have to remove the switch to replace that.

On my SM this is the proceedure for the Lofrans Tigres, but on older models it might be different.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477