Date   

Re: Silicone BT seals

Jose Venegas
 

Jose, do you still use the inner neoprene seals, too?  
YES

Do you use RTV sealant to keep them in place?  
I USED SILICON SEALANT
 
Any other tips?
Lubricate trunk with silicon grease periodically 



Re: What is this

Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...>
 

Thanks JP!

No, Z is working in Lithuania.  Someone has to make money in this family.  My role is young SPENDER.   Currently I am on the hard here in Krabi Boat Lagoon, and loving it.  Working away on Aquarius getting her ready for the Indian Ocean Crossing!  Just ordered my third battery......  Now Aquarius will have 900AH usable at 24V.  I did a load pull on my 1 year old 600AH 24V battery bank, and ran the portable Aircon off my inverter for 19.5 hours.....  Average 32Amps...  Just about 620AH...  OMG, I would not do this again, but the results were amazing.  How are you and Julie doing?

Ken Powers
Aquarius
SM2K#262


Re: What is this

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi Ken, 

I think it’s the key way and locknut for the fixed pitch prop. 

Is Z back in Thailand too

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera SM007



On 2 Jun 2021, at 14:48, Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote:

This "tool?" was in the same place as my prop puller, but not sure what it is for.  Looks like it may help pull out the seals on the prop shaft, but need your help.  What is this, and how do you use it?

Thanks,

Ken Powers
Aquarius
SM2K#262
Thailand
<IMG20210531203151.jpg>


What is this

Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...>
 

This "tool?" was in the same place as my prop puller, but not sure what it is for.  Looks like it may help pull out the seals on the prop shaft, but need your help.  What is this, and how do you use it?

Thanks,

Ken Powers
Aquarius
SM2K#262
Thailand


Re: Silicone BT seals

karkauai
 

Thanks, Steve and Jose, fir the Pics abd description.
Jose, do you still use the inner neoprene seals, too?  Do you use RTV sealant to keep them in place?  Any other tips?

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Fuel Bladders

David Vogel
 

Yes, I agree with both Bill R & JP,

We have not absolutely needed the extra fuel for ‘underway’ point-to-point passage-making. But we have needed it due to the interruption of the normal supply line, or exercising the option we had (due to having ~800 litres on-board) to stay away from population centres for extended periods. Both of these events responding to or resulting from COVID and directly-related circumstances. Sometime, we have expected to be able to fuel up monthly, but with a 3-month delay until the next fuel supplies arrive on-island (or anywhere within 500nm). We were glad to have the extra fuel on-board in these cases.

Perhaps the point I wish to make is that - for prolonged remote-area cruising where sometimes one is held in a remote area/s due to circumstances not of your choosing - everything (such as supply lines, including fuel supplies to remote island archipelagos) has changed due to COVID, and what worked in prior years may not work so well in future.

Supply chain management: we are also seeing reduced availability of spare parts, and greater delays (or more expense to reduce the delay) of various (otherwise normally available items) – even such mundane items as oil filters. Folks planning to head out into the wild blue yonder may beneficially review their on-board spares & consumables holdings accordingly. Also, choose your freight company with care.

For example, using FEDEX out of the US, to French Polynesia, results in items ending up in NZ (with no onwards to FP). A simply request for a re-direct has resulted in item/s been forwarded to Australia (abandon all hope). If you are fortunate enough to able to actually get someone to physically locate your item in NZ, then it can be sent from NZ to Europe, and from there re-consigned to FP. Or, choose a US supplier that in the first place will ship via DHL. Or, choose a supplier in Europe, not the US.

The world has changed in strange ways. And it is not as simple as it once was, not that it was ‘simple’ in the first place.

Best to all.

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@gmail.com>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, 1 June 2021 at 11:05 am
To: <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Bill Rouse, 

We concur with your view: we have 1 X 20 litre of diesel and 1 X 20 litre gasoline for the outboard. Neither one was used during our longest sea legs

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera SM007

On 2/06/2021, at 8:00 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@gmail.com> wrote:

David,

In our 10 years and 40,000 miles, we never needed the 190 extra liters and most of the miles we didn't have solar.

If we were to do it again, we would probably not carry extra fuel, but would have about 800 watts of solar. 
Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@gmail.com
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 1:50 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@westnet.com.au> wrote:
Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck.  PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof.  (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel?  We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all.  I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus.  We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities.  Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs.  We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@gmail.com>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429


Re: Silicone BT seals

Jose Venegas
 

Actually I am not sure which order works best. Either one should do the job
Only time will tell us
The important thing is to use a silicon RTV glue. This year, after 2 years I serviced the BT but I did NOT CHANGE THE SEAS.
I did glued the foam donut to the silicone seals to avoid it going up and down but I agree that it may not be needed


Re: Silicone BT seals

Jose Venegas
 

Four years and going strong

The two seals in series have the lips facing the sea. See pix


Re: Silicone BT seals

Dan Wilcox
 

Are the seals still available?  This is a constant problem I'm fighting.

Thanks, Dan
Feierabend SM#86

On Tuesday, June 1, 2021, 12:32:45 PM EDT, Stephen Davis <flyboyscd@...> wrote:


Hi Kent,

I can’t promise you the way I installed the seals is correct, but I can tell you that we have gone over 4000 miles since installation with zero water intrusion. The way you received the seals fitted together is not the way they are installed. Also, the seals will not be flush, but will be about 1/8” above the flat surface around them. Because of this, I attempted to contact cement the upper foam seal against the silicone seal, and that didn’t really work. I now have the foam seal free floating between the bottom of the motor and the top of the seal. It really just acts as a pad between the motor and the seals when the motor is in the down position. You do not need the foam seal to prevent water intrusion, as no water gets by the silicone seals. Another difference in the install is that I used a lot of adhesive RTV sealant (black) to firmly hold the seals in place, and have had no issues with the seals coming out. I also put a very thin coat on Moly-kote on the shaft of the thruster to make it move a bit easier through the 2 seals. see the attached picture for the orientation of my seals. 

Prior to the installation of the silicone seals, we always had water getting in the boat in spite of servicing the thruster once a year. This is one of the better improvements I have made to the boat, and it has completely solved the water getting by the seals issue. Another benefit is that I see absolutely no reason to change the seals until you see some deterioration of the silicone, which I expect to be many years. 


Good luck with the install. 


Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Anchored in Poulsbo, WA


Re: Fuel Bladders

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Bill Rouse, 

We concur with your view: we have 1 X 20 litre of diesel and 1 X 20 litre gasoline for the outboard. Neither one was used during our longest sea legs

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera SM007


On 2/06/2021, at 8:00 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


David,

In our 10 years and 40,000 miles, we never needed the 190 extra liters and most of the miles we didn't have solar.

If we were to do it again, we would probably not carry extra fuel, but would have about 800 watts of solar. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 1:50 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck.  PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof.  (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel?  We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all.  I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus.  We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities.  Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs.  We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429










Re: Fuel Bladders

 

David,

In our 10 years and 40,000 miles, we never needed the 190 extra liters and most of the miles we didn't have solar.

If we were to do it again, we would probably not carry extra fuel, but would have about 800 watts of solar. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 1:50 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck.  PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof.  (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel?  We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all.  I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus.  We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities.  Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs.  We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429










Re: Fuel Bladders

David Vogel
 

Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck. PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof. (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel? We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all. I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus. We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities. Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs. We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@gmail.com>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429


Re: Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Johannes Schmidt
 

Dear Greg,
 
Thank you for your message. I will be happy to keep you up to date.
Thank you for that great offer - yes, please send me the  the measurement of the original - so I'm definitely on the safe side.
My e-mail is: js@...

I‘m looking forward to reading from you, have fun in Preveza, we have been there for a few years!
 
Best regards!
 
Johannes


Re: Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Gregory Shea
 

Dear Johannes, 
Plese let us know if you receive a reply from Amel SAV. 
If they cannot help you, I will be at my boat this weekend and I have a leather wrapped wheel. I can send you photos and dimensions. What is the best private E mail to reach you?

Greg Shea
Sharki 133
Cap des iles
Preveza, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Johannes Schmidt <info@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 1:32 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?
 
Dear Mark,

thank you for that suggestion - yes I did and I‘m still waiting for an answer - therefore I also looked out for alternative providers (which all ask for measurements, of course) ;-)

Do you have any contact details? I just send an inquiry via their Website - Contact Form....?

Kind regards,

Johannes


Re: Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Johannes Schmidt
 

Dear Mark,

thank you for that suggestion - yes I did and I‘m still waiting for an answer - therefore I also looked out for alternative providers (which all ask for measurements, of course) ;-)

Do you have any contact details? I just send an inquiry via their Website - Contact Form....?

Kind regards,

Johannes


Re: Mainsheet Traveller replacement on an early Super Maramu

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Mark and Nicky,

We own SM#72, and I’ll attach a picture of our main sheet traveler. The early SMs had Lewmar travelers, and sometime not too long after our hull number Amel switched to Antal. It is a bit odd, as all other blocks on our boat are Antal like every other Amel. Our traveler still works fine, but the plastic rollers on the ends fell apart, and I rigged the block you will see in the picture for the traveler adjustment lines. I do lose a bit of adjustment, but it works fine for my non racing style. If I ever have to change the traveler, It will require removing the track, filling the holes, and installing new track with a new traveler. I can’t find any currently made traveler that will fit my almost 30 year old track. The blocks on the end of the track were also made by Lewmar. They were made of some composite material which finally disintegrated with the UV. They were fairly easy to remove, and I had a very talented machinist in Port Townsend make me new ones out of anodized aluminum with beautiful sheaves this winter, as nothing was commercially available. 

Regards
Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Anchored in Poulsbo, WA


Re: Silicone BT seals

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Kent,

I can’t promise you the way I installed the seals is correct, but I can tell you that we have gone over 4000 miles since installation with zero water intrusion. The way you received the seals fitted together is not the way they are installed. Also, the seals will not be flush, but will be about 1/8” above the flat surface around them. Because of this, I attempted to contact cement the upper foam seal against the silicone seal, and that didn’t really work. I now have the foam seal free floating between the bottom of the motor and the top of the seal. It really just acts as a pad between the motor and the seals when the motor is in the down position. You do not need the foam seal to prevent water intrusion, as no water gets by the silicone seals. Another difference in the install is that I used a lot of adhesive RTV sealant (black) to firmly hold the seals in place, and have had no issues with the seals coming out. I also put a very thin coat on Moly-kote on the shaft of the thruster to make it move a bit easier through the 2 seals. see the attached picture for the orientation of my seals. 

Prior to the installation of the silicone seals, we always had water getting in the boat in spite of servicing the thruster once a year. This is one of the better improvements I have made to the boat, and it has completely solved the water getting by the seals issue. Another benefit is that I see absolutely no reason to change the seals until you see some deterioration of the silicone, which I expect to be many years. 


Good luck with the install. 


Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Anchored in Poulsbo, WA


Re: Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Mark Erdos
 

Have you tried contacting Amel for a new wheel cover. They recently provided a new cover for our SM.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Johannes Schmidt
Sent: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 1:42 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

 

Dear all,

We followed your experiences with new leather covers for steering wheels with great interest.

Since we also have to change our leather cover, but are currently not on our Sharki and have forgotten to take the measurements, we are looking for your support here.

 

Does anyone know of you - or can someone take the measurements from the steering wheel of an AMEL Sharki?

  • The Diameter of the wheel
  • The Diameter of the steel tube
  • The Diameter of the spokes at the welding point (Outside of the Wheel)
  • The Diameter of the spokes at 10cm distance from the Outside of the Wheel

Thank you all in advance and kind regards,

Johannes


Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Johannes Schmidt
 

Dear all,
We followed your experiences with new leather covers for steering wheels with great interest.
Since we also have to change our leather cover, but are currently not on our Sharki and have forgotten to take the measurements, we are looking for your support here.
 
Does anyone know of you - or can someone take the measurements from the steering wheel of an AMEL Sharki?

  • The Diameter of the wheel
  • The Diameter of the steel tube
  • The Diameter of the spokes at the welding point (Outside of the Wheel)
  • The Diameter of the spokes at 10cm distance from the Outside of the Wheel
Thank you all in advance and kind regards,

Johannes


Re: What is this puller for

karkauai
 

Thanks again, Danny, I will need to pull the wheel this Fall!

Kent

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243

961 - 980 of 59181