Date   

Re: Volvo D3-110 belt changes

 

Alex,

Write JEFFREY KRAUS <jmkraus"at"optonline.net>. I believe that he found Volvo installed the wrong pulley. Please post what you find.

 
Best,

Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St.
Galveston, Texas 77550
832-380-4970



On Thu, May 9, 2019 at 8:37 PM Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Hi Alex,

if your alternator belt is wearing it is highly likely you have belt slip. Check your tension. Other than an unlikely substandard belt it has to be slip.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 09 May 2019 at 18:28 Denis Elborn <delborn@...> wrote:

Alex,

It does seem a short time for the alternator belt, age is also a factor. At least you can see it and determine when to replace it unlike the timing belt.

Volvo sell two special tools, one needed and one nice to have. The needed one is a special puller to get the bottom pulley off of the crankshaft and the nice one is fitted to the bottom pulley to stop the engine rotating. Instead you can remove the starter motor and jamb something in there to stop the flywheel rotating, a bit crude but it will work.

IMO it is worth replacing the tensioner, idle pulley and water pump when doing the belt replacement. Volvo sell a kit excluding the water pump.

Denis
Aventura A54-113
Cleopatra marina -Greece



 

On 9 May 2019, at 12:28 am, Alex Ramseyer < alexramseyer@...> wrote:

The alternator belt on my Volvo D3 lasts ca 300h. In the French manual that I have onboard, it sais this belt should last 1200h. What's the experience in this group?

According to a certified Volvo technician from a Volvo dealer here in FLA, the TIMER BELT should last 1500h. I was about ready to change after 800h based on the advice from the former owner. What is the experience of this group in regards to the timing belt?

Also, if someone knows which exact special tool I need to change myself and where to get that, would be great!
Thank you for your advice.
Alex
SY NO STRESS 
AMEL54#15


 


 


Re: Volvo D3-110 belt changes

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Alex,

if your alternator belt is wearing it is highly likely you have belt slip. Check your tension. Other than an unlikely substandard belt it has to be slip.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 09 May 2019 at 18:28 Denis Elborn <delborn@...> wrote:

Alex,

It does seem a short time for the alternator belt, age is also a factor. At least you can see it and determine when to replace it unlike the timing belt.

Volvo sell two special tools, one needed and one nice to have. The needed one is a special puller to get the bottom pulley off of the crankshaft and the nice one is fitted to the bottom pulley to stop the engine rotating. Instead you can remove the starter motor and jamb something in there to stop the flywheel rotating, a bit crude but it will work.

IMO it is worth replacing the tensioner, idle pulley and water pump when doing the belt replacement. Volvo sell a kit excluding the water pump.

Denis
Aventura A54-113
Cleopatra marina -Greece



 

On 9 May 2019, at 12:28 am, Alex Ramseyer < alexramseyer@...> wrote:

The alternator belt on my Volvo D3 lasts ca 300h. In the French manual that I have onboard, it sais this belt should last 1200h. What's the experience in this group?

According to a certified Volvo technician from a Volvo dealer here in FLA, the TIMER BELT should last 1500h. I was about ready to change after 800h based on the advice from the former owner. What is the experience of this group in regards to the timing belt?

Also, if someone knows which exact special tool I need to change myself and where to get that, would be great!
Thank you for your advice.
Alex
SY NO STRESS 
AMEL54#15


 


 


Re: Volvo D3-110 belt changes

Mark & Debbie Mueller
 

The service manual I have says 1400 hours for the timing belt but makes no mention of the alternator belt.

--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54


Re: Pasarelle on 54

Dimitris Krasopoulos
 

I have not yet replaced it 

On Thu, May 9, 2019 at 17:12 CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
How have 54 owners replaced the hand rope?

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Yacht School - Supporting Amel Owners
www.YachtSchool.us
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

--
Best Regards

Dimitris Krasopoulos
Dubai Mob: +971 564602575
Greek Mob:+306944302318


Pasarelle on 54

 

How have 54 owners replaced the hand rope?

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Yacht School - Supporting Amel Owners
www.YachtSchool.us
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


Re: Copper earthing/bonding strap broken in bilge on Amel 54

Alan Leslie
 

5 years ago we replaced the broken copper strap on Elyse using Bills diagram as a guide, but from 1/4" X 2" solid copper.
Followed the instructions with socket and extensions to get the old strap out.
Drilled and threaded holes for all the bonding wires.
Installed the bonding strap to the keel bolt.
Stripped the bonding wires back to bare copper, new lugs and bolted them to the copper strap.
5 years on looks as good as new.
AND no bonding issues.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 


Re: Toe pulley

Alan Leslie
 

Jean Luc,

Are you using Vectran ?..and have you retensioned it after some time and getting wet ?
I have had success so far, but no really tough wind yet to do a good test.

Best
ALAN
Elyse SM437


Re: Volvo D3-110 belt changes

Denis Elborn
 

Alex,

It does seem a short time for the alternator belt, age is also a factor. At least you can see it and determine when to replace it unlike the timing belt.

Volvo sell two special tools, one needed and one nice to have. The needed one is a special puller to get the bottom pulley off of the crankshaft and the nice one is fitted to the bottom pulley to stop the engine rotating. Instead you can remove the starter motor and jamb something in there to stop the flywheel rotating, a bit crude but it will work.

IMO it is worth replacing the tensioner, idle pulley and water pump when doing the belt replacement. Volvo sell a kit excluding the water pump.

Denis
Aventura A54-113
Cleopatra marina -Greece




On 9 May 2019, at 12:28 am, Alex Ramseyer <alexramseyer@...> wrote:

The alternator belt on my Volvo D3 lasts ca 300h. In the French manual that I have onboard, it sais this belt should last 1200h. What's the experience in this group?

According to a certified Volvo technician from a Volvo dealer here in FLA, the TIMER BELT should last 1500h. I was about ready to change after 800h based on the advice from the former owner. What is the experience of this group in regards to the timing belt?

Also, if someone knows which exact special tool I need to change myself and where to get that, would be great!
Thank you for your advice.
Alex
SY NO STRESS 
AMEL54#15


Volvo D3-110 belt changes

Alexander Ramseyer
 

The alternator belt on my Volvo D3 lasts ca 300h. In the French manual that I have onboard, it sais this belt should last 1200h. What's the experience in this group?

According to a certified Volvo technician from a Volvo dealer here in FLA, the TIMER BELT should last 1500h. I was about ready to change after 800h based on the advice from the former owner. What is the experience of this group in regards to the timing belt?

Also, if someone knows which exact special tool I need to change myself and where to get that, would be great!
Thank you for your advice.
Alex
SY NO STRESS 
AMEL54#15


Re: Dessalator cuts out when flushing

Gary Silver
 

Hi James, You are correct, depending on the source you look at 1 micro-siemen/cm = to about 0.65 TDS for seawater.  I have corrected my original message. 

This is the EC meter I bought ( example   https://www.ebay.com/itm/OMEGA-ENGINEERING-CDCN-201-CDCN201-RQANS2-/232703669959 )  it is powered by 230 VAC, has adjustable alarm limits (I verified the calibration on mine using some standardized calibrated water), and it has relay output for the alarm and/or bypass valve.  I included some LEDs to show power, and alarm condition but that was just fluff.  I powered it from the Dessalinator CB  so that any time that CB is on the salinity sensor is on.  The relay output switches 24 VDC to the sonalert that has an inline switch that I label "arm / mute" so I can mute the sonalert while the startup cycle does it's thing (i.e. high EC). The bypass switch is labeled "save / discard".  I will draw up a schematic of the system and post it in the files section under Amel SM - Dessalator.  The sensor is plumbed into the product water line as it exits the membranes (next to the original sham sensor).  I think I already posted a picture of that.  My timer for the auto flush circuit is a 24 volt fish feeder 7 day programable timer hooked to a relay.  The wire from the 24 VDC panel for the pressurized water pump passes thru this relay on the Normally Open contacts.  When the timer is in the "ON" mode the relay closes and supplies 24 VDC to the fresh water pump.  When I leave the boat I place the flush valve in the the "flush" position and set the Timer to "Auto" mode so that when the timer commands, the relay closes, energizing the fresh water pump for the period programmed into the timer.  Once the flush is complete the power to the fresh water pump is interrupted by the relay contacts opening.  So the pressurized water system is not always pressurized lest a leak flood the boat.  It is only pressurized during relay closure.

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] unending flow

Mark & Debbie Mueller
 

Hope I'm not butting in, I replaced both valves a couple of months ago. I purchased them from Burkert; info below.  I bought two, one to keep for a spare.  Within 3 weeks the second OEM valve also failed.  Be very careful when removing the hose connections, there are several components to connector and some pieces are quite fragile.

Burkert #6213 A 13.0 NBR MS G ½" 2/2-way-solenoid valve, servo coupled / Ident No. 125657  (new Ident. No 221602)
https://www.burkert-usa.com/en/products/solenoid-valves/water-solenoid-valves/221602


--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] unending flow

Alexander Ramseyer
 

Hi, could anyone please let me know where I should source the Burkert water valve solenoid in the U.S.?
Thanks,
Alex
NO STRESS 


Re: B&G Navigation instruments

Alexander Ramseyer
 

Hi Ahmet,
is your masthead unit still for sale? How much do you want for it and where is it ?
Best regards, Alex


Re: Dessalator cuts out when flushing

karkauai
 

Hi Gary,
I also have the bogus TDS monitor on my D60.

I’m also interested in your TDS monitor and automatic flushing system.  Can you post pics and/or specifics of what parts you used, and tell us about any snags you encountered?

Thanks!
Kent

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy SM243
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On May 7, 2019, at 2:32 PM, James Cromie via Groups.Io <jamescromie@...> wrote:

Thanks for your information Gary. I am interested in knowing g more about the electrical conductivity sensor you are using.  I would like to install something similar.  
By the way, correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought 1 microseimen/cm = 0.641 ppm. That certainly seems more in line with my TDS readings.  I've never seen a TDS as low as a single digits number on my system. 

Best,
James
Soteria SM 347


On May 7, 2019 14:19, "Gary Silver via Groups.Io" <garysilver@...> wrote:
Hi Bill and All:  

Perhaps I can add something about the behavior or the TDS (electrical conductivity = EC really) of the product water upon startup. 
Background:  My system is the original Amel system for a vintage 2001 (hull #335 SM).  It had (and still have) the sham TDS circuit board installation from Dessalator.  I have however re-fitted my system with an external continuous monitoring EC sensor on the product water line along with manual bypass valve switch and LED indicator light as well as a 110 decibel sonalert to alarm if the TDS (EC) rises above the level I select on the TDS sensor.   I have also installed a 7 day timer that flushes my system with product water from the tanks for 5 minutes every other day (uses about 4 liters of water per flush cycle) while I am not on the boat.  Haven't used sterilizing solution in more than 10 years now and have avoided all the corrosion problems associated therewith.  Additionally I am on only my 3rd set of membranes in 18 years. Those boats refitted with the Dessalator automatic flushing board and 54s etc I presume have a TDS sensor that actually works.

On my boat the Startup TDS readings:   Remember this is with the system completely filled with fresh water and the pressure knob turned anti-clockwise:   Upon initial startup the TDS is low (somewhere in the vicinity of where it was when the system was shut down, and in my case electrical conductivity (EC) of approx. 450 micro-siemens, 1 micro-siemen = .0055 PPM TDS, so this is about TDS of 2.48 ).  After a few seconds of raising the pressure to the operational range by turning the knob on the control panel to restrict flow and thereby increase the membrane side pressure, the EC (TDS) rises almost immediately to max out my salinity sensor over 5,000 micro-siemens.  About 20 seconds later, the conductivity/salinity begins to fall back to the acceptable range.  When it falls to this level I manually throw the switch to activate the diverter valve (valve is normally closed / in diversion) and simultaneously arm the sonalert alarm system.  The EC spike that occurs upon start-up has always baffled me as it occurs no matter how many months the system has been flushed with fresh water.  I can only assume it is due to some residual salts in the nooks and crannies of the membranes that is briefly excreted with the first product water.  These findings are consistent and is perhaps the basis of the 1 minute bypass timer in the  automatic system that Dessalator engineered.  I really like my manual system and I love that the system continuously monitors and instantaneously alarms if there is high TDS (EC). 

Just some food for thought on my experience with independent monitoring of the EC (TDS) of the Dessalator water maker.

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
Puerto Del Rey Marina - Puerto Rico

Sincerely, 

 I have th


Re: Dessalator cuts out when flushing

James Cromie
 

Thanks for your information Gary. I am interested in knowing g more about the electrical conductivity sensor you are using.  I would like to install something similar.  
By the way, correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought 1 microseimen/cm = 0.641 ppm. That certainly seems more in line with my TDS readings.  I've never seen a TDS as low as a single digits number on my system. 

Best,
James
Soteria SM 347


On May 7, 2019 14:19, "Gary Silver via Groups.Io" <garysilver@...> wrote:
Hi Bill and All:  

Perhaps I can add something about the behavior or the TDS (electrical conductivity = EC really) of the product water upon startup. 
Background:  My system is the original Amel system for a vintage 2001 (hull #335 SM).  It had (and still have) the sham TDS circuit board installation from Dessalator.  I have however re-fitted my system with an external continuous monitoring EC sensor on the product water line along with manual bypass valve switch and LED indicator light as well as a 110 decibel sonalert to alarm if the TDS (EC) rises above the level I select on the TDS sensor.   I have also installed a 7 day timer that flushes my system with product water from the tanks for 5 minutes every other day (uses about 4 liters of water per flush cycle) while I am not on the boat.  Haven't used sterilizing solution in more than 10 years now and have avoided all the corrosion problems associated therewith.  Additionally I am on only my 3rd set of membranes in 18 years. Those boats refitted with the Dessalator automatic flushing board and 54s etc I presume have a TDS sensor that actually works.

On my boat the Startup TDS readings:   Remember this is with the system completely filled with fresh water and the pressure knob turned anti-clockwise:   Upon initial startup the TDS is low (somewhere in the vicinity of where it was when the system was shut down, and in my case electrical conductivity (EC) of approx. 450 micro-siemens, 1 micro-siemen = .0055 PPM TDS, so this is about TDS of 2.48 ).  After a few seconds of raising the pressure to the operational range by turning the knob on the control panel to restrict flow and thereby increase the membrane side pressure, the EC (TDS) rises almost immediately to max out my salinity sensor over 5,000 micro-siemens.  About 20 seconds later, the conductivity/salinity begins to fall back to the acceptable range.  When it falls to this level I manually throw the switch to activate the diverter valve (valve is normally closed / in diversion) and simultaneously arm the sonalert alarm system.  The EC spike that occurs upon start-up has always baffled me as it occurs no matter how many months the system has been flushed with fresh water.  I can only assume it is due to some residual salts in the nooks and crannies of the membranes that is briefly excreted with the first product water.  These findings are consistent and is perhaps the basis of the 1 minute bypass timer in the  automatic system that Dessalator engineered.  I really like my manual system and I love that the system continuously monitors and instantaneously alarms if there is high TDS (EC). 

Just some food for thought on my experience with independent monitoring of the EC (TDS) of the Dessalator water maker.

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
Puerto Del Rey Marina - Puerto Rico

Sincerely, 

 I have th


Re: Dessalator cuts out when flushing

Gary Silver
 
Edited

Hi Bill and All:  

Perhaps I can add something about the behavior or the TDS (electrical conductivity = EC really) of the product water upon startup. 
Background:  My system is the original Amel system for a vintage 2001 (hull #335 SM).  It had (and still have) the sham TDS circuit board installation from Dessalator.  I have however re-fitted my system with an external continuous monitoring EC sensor on the product water line along with manual bypass valve switch and LED indicator light as well as a 110 decibel sonalert to alarm if the TDS (EC) rises above the level I select on the TDS sensor.   I have also installed a 7 day timer that flushes my system with product water from the tanks for 5 minutes every other day (uses about 4 liters of water per flush cycle) while I am not on the boat.  Haven't used sterilizing solution in more than 10 years now and have avoided all the corrosion problems associated therewith.  Additionally I am on only my 3rd set of membranes in 18 years. Those boats refitted with the Dessalator automatic flushing board and 54s etc I presume have a TDS sensor that actually works.

On my boat the Startup TDS readings:   Remember this is with the system completely filled with fresh water and the pressure knob turned anti-clockwise:   Upon initial startup the TDS is low (somewhere in the vicinity of where it was when the system was shut down, and in my case electrical conductivity (EC) of approx. 450 micro-siemens/cm, where 1 micro-ciemen/cm for sea water is about 0.68 TDS).  After a few seconds of raising the pressure to the operational range by turning the knob on the control panel to restrict flow and thereby increase the membrane side pressure, the EC (TDS) rises almost immediately to max out my salinity sensor over 2,000 micro-siemens.  About 20 seconds later, the conductivity/salinity begins to fall back to the acceptable range.  When it falls to this level I manually throw the switch to activate the diverter valve (valve is normally closed / in diversion) and simultaneously arm the sonalert alarm system.  The EC spike that occurs upon start-up has always baffled me as it occurs no matter how many months the system has been flushed with fresh water.  I can only assume it is due to some residual salts in the nooks and crannies of the membranes that is briefly excreted with the first product water.  These findings are consistent and is perhaps the basis of the 1 minute bypass timer in the  automatic system that Dessalator engineered.  I really like my manual system and I love that the system continuously monitors and instantaneously alarms if there is high TDS (EC). 

Just some food for thought on my experience with independent monitoring of the EC (TDS) of the Dessalator water maker.

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
Puerto Del Rey Marina - Puerto Rico

Sincerely, 

 I have th


Re: Outhaul-furler motor shaft failure

Mike Ondra
 

Thanks for the info Gary. I shall report if I hear from Maud, and whatever other solution we come up with in the event that Amel no longer has access to this assembly.

Mike

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Silver via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, May 7, 2019 1:44 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Outhaul-furler motor shaft failure

 

Hi Mike:  When my SM, a 2001 #335, was about 4 years old the main sail furling gearbox motor shaft sheared for unknown reasons.  Ray Eaton, Joel's Ft. Lauderdale guru at the time, (about 2005) said he had not seen that happen before. I have not had this happen again despite the boat being now about 18 years old (but then I have only sailed her about 18,000 sea miles during that time). About two years ago I ordered a complete assembly (gearbox, motor, mounting ring and cover) from Maud as I realized that even though I had several spare gearboxes I didn't have a spare motor.  That entire assembly was available from Amel at that time. 

Good luck in securing replacements or alternatives. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
Puerto Del Rey Marina, Fajardo Puerto Rico


Re: Outhaul-furler motor shaft failure

Gary Silver
 

Hi Mike:  When my SM, a 2001 #335, was about 4 years old the main sail furling gearbox motor shaft sheared for unknown reasons.  Ray Eaton, Joel's Ft. Lauderdale guru at the time, (about 2005) said he had not seen that happen before. I have not had this happen again despite the boat being now about 18 years old (but then I have only sailed her about 18,000 sea miles during that time). About two years ago I ordered a complete assembly (gearbox, motor, mounting ring and cover) from Maud as I realized that even though I had several spare gearboxes I didn't have a spare motor.  That entire assembly was available from Amel at that time. 

Good luck in securing replacements or alternatives. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
Puerto Del Rey Marina, Fajardo Puerto Rico


Re: Outhaul-furler motor shaft failure

Mike Ondra
 

Upon disassembly of the gear box I found that the top furler gearbox main bearing had seized. This could well have been the origin of the shaft failure. These gear boxes being mounted with the shaft vertical are subject to water intrusion from above. I saw similar but not as severe deterioration on the outhaul gearbox several years ago when I rebuilt it. This bearing is above and probably not receiving grease, so even with the grease nipple configuration may be vulnerable. It might be a good idea at several year intervals to take apart the gearbox to check and possibly replace this bearing. They cost less than $20. Strategies to keep water off the top of these gearboxes would be helpful however difficult they may be to execute.

 

Anyway replacement of the Leroy Somers motor seems to be a problem. It appears that this model is no longer in production, there is no inventory, and they do not have a replacement with these specs. I have not as of yet heard from Maud if Amel may have this motor. Searching for a like spec/dimension motor on the internet gets close, but not perfect, matches relative to hp/Kw, rpm, Intrusion Protection, Insulation, shaft diameter/length, etc.

 

BTW, the manual furling system works quite well, but obviously not convenient.

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Ondra via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, April 28, 2019 6:51 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Outhaul-furler motor shaft failure

 

We have now had the second Leroy Somer motor shaft shear off where in enters the gearbox. First the outhaul 2 years ago, and now the mainsail furler. Sheared at same location. Rust evidence of possible stress crack that eventually left maybe 10%-15% of the shaft in tact that then sheared off. Aletes is 20 years old. Has anyone else experienced this? Had a spare for the first failure, now sourcing a replacement for the second failure.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Chesapeake Bay

 


Re: Any news about the 3D printed Toe pulley (headsail)

Red1 Stella SM359
 

Mark,

a bit late but I just wanted to say that the sheaves are installed on Stella SM359 and worked perfectly even under tension.  No issue at all; AND they look GREAT!

Thank you very much for your support and your sharing the details of the machinist! We should look at getting further SS things from him!

Redouan 
SM 359 Stella

On 11 Apr 2019, at 15:58, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

Jose,

My machinist just finished making another batch of the jib car pulleys from 316L Stainless Steel:

<IMG_20190410_182353035.jpg>

<Single Jib Car Pulley Complete Kit.jpg>

<SM _ 207 02.jpg>

The design is pretty much identical to the original cast aluminum pulleys but we make them out of 316L Stainless Steel to avoid the corrosion issues the aluminum ones suffer from. I sell them for US$190 for each complete pulley so $380 for a set of two (2) pulleys.  Contact me at mfmcgovern at gmail dot com if you are interested in purchasing them.

Out of curiosity I got a quote for getting them made using Direct Metal Laser Sintering process (3D Printing) out of the same 316L Stainless Steel material. The quote was around US$1776 per pulley or US$3552 for a set of two pulleys:

<Jib Car Pulley 3D Print Quote.PNG>  
 

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA