Date   

Re: Dive cylinder fill compressor.

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thanks Mark, just the information I need. It works well?

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 09 March 2019 at 23:12 Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

H Danny,

 

It is a Junior II by Bauer: https://www.bauer-kompressoren.de/products/breathing-air-sports/compact-line-100-140-lmin/junior-ii-100-lmin/

 

We have this on Cream Puff and was installed by Amel. The installation has the unit sitting on a sliding tray so you can take advantage of some storage when the unit is push far to port in the locker out of use.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2019 3:45 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Dive cylinder fill compressor.

 

Hi all,

when we bought Ocean Pearl the previous owner had removed the dive compressor. I would like to add this now. (belatedly) having finally moved from the must have list to the nice to have list. What make and model did Amel install and any other advice gratefully received. The 230 volt wiring is in place in the large cockpit  port locker.

Thanks in advance

Danny

SM 299 

Ocean Pearl

 



 


 


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Nick. Good system. I had a professional painter do decks for me years ago on a boat several previous. He used epsom salts rather than sugar. He graded the crystals into three sizes and masked the side decks into oblongs separated by the width of the masking tape. He painted then each oblong  using a food can with holes punched in the bottom and sprinkled the epsom salts evenly over the wet paint.

He used the different sizes of crystals creating a really nice effect, largest at the back, then smaller and then smallest at the front. As with the sugar when the paint was dry he washed the epsom salts out with water. The effect was outstanding, looked terrific with the oblong patters and the different indent sizes. No overpaint was needed as the larger crystals gave a less sharp effect than sugar. The different grades gave different grip, the smallest the best which is why he used those on the front where the fore deck crew had to work.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 09 March 2019 at 22:36 "ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io" <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Non Slip Paint

Many years ago on my first boat, "Faith of Norfolk” I was fed up with the teak deck. So I ripped it all up. It had been laid over ply which was still sound. To cut a long story short; after glassing the ply with epoxy and filling and fairing I was left with a blank canvas. I wanted a good even non skid surface, but being up the Lumut river in Malaysia 1993 with minimal materials to hand and certainly no chandlers even if I had any money, I used sugar.

I split the non skid area up into do-able zones, well prepped and masked. using some pale grey epoxy primer paint, I wetted out the area and then using a sieve sprinkled the sugar on the wet paint until it was evenly covered. Once dry I washed it all off really well making sure that no sugar was left. This I tested by licking the deck! The result was that the sugar created tiny volcanoes in the paint that were very grippy. Too grippy/ quite sharp but then when over painted with the finish paint came out just right.

It is an unconventional approach but has many advantages, not least being sandable. I suggest trying it out on a piece of board.

Nick

Amelia (54 hull 019)

On 8 Mar 2019, at 23:23, James Alton via Groups.Io < lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Jose,

   When you say that the Faux-teak is missing in places do those thin areas look white by chance? If so closely by feel deck where you have the white areas and you may find that the wood grain texture exists in these areas, they are just the wrong colour.  In looking at my boat, I am pretty certain that Amel brushed the gel coat into the mold for the Faux teak colour and then sprayed the rest of the deck mold with the white gel coat that we see on the areas outside of the Faux teak area.   This makes sense from a production standpoint because to spray the Faux-teak area would require masking off the entire deck mold except for the Faux-teak area..a lot of extra work.  It is really hard to brush gel coat to a  perfectly even thickness  so perfectly normal to have some thinner areas.  These thin areas look on my boat like brush marks because actually they are, only from the reverse side. (grin)  The only point I wanted to make was that on my boat at least, enough white gel coat was sprayed over the top of the Faux Teak gel coat that despite the Faux-Teak colour being thin in places, the fibreglass is well covered and protected.  So I view this as just a cosmetic issue so pretty low down on my to do list currently.  

  You can certainly experiment with patching in the Faux-teak colour where it is missing.  I have not yet tried touching up my decks using the ideas that follow so your mileage may vary but I have done similar touchups on some other projects.  Unfortunately the results I have obtained are never as good as the original but there has always been improvement..  I would suggest getting a flattening agent for your Awlgrip to reduce the gloss and improve the traction some.  You will need to experiment with how much to add to get your best match.  The paint will need to be dry to know for sure how it will look. Go for a bit too shiny as the trend will be for the Awlgrip to flatten more over time.    As you found out, super shiny Awlgrip is really slippery stuff.  

  I wish that I could suggest an anti-slip additive for painted surfaces but I have not really found one that I like much and I have tried more than a dozen over the years.  Sand does work great for nonskid but it is too hard to sand down with normal sandpaper so when the time comes to recoat you have a problem.  Sand also has a colour so will show up as the paint wears down or chips off of the sand bits and this is the problem with many of the other additives.  We have had good luck using glass beads to varnish.  These tiny beads are added to the paint used for reflective stripping on the roads.  With (Including the Awlgrip /Awlbrite varnish) varnish, the glass beads disappear visually though the non-skid texture remains.  You can also sand them down when the time comes which is a little confusing since I would think that glass would be too hard to sand too but it does work.  I have not tried the glass beads with the Awlgrip paint but it might be worth doing a small test panel to see if you like it or not.  The fine Awlgrip non-skid additive will hold up the best of the additives they sell.  The more coarse Awlgrip additives become very slippery over time as the paint sticks poorly to the plastic bits so eventually you end up walking on the exposed plastic bits as the paint chips off.  I developed a technique where I thicken the Awlgrip and apply it with a roller.  It makes the best non skid I have walked on to date but it would completely cover you wood grain. 

   If you go to the   Awlgrip.com website and click on colours at the top of the page, you will see the option to have custom colours created.  Awl grip can be applied in thin coats which you can use to your advantage in blending the paint to the Faux-Teak gel coat.  Build up thin coats  as needed to cover your thin areas and then enlarge the patched area with additional coats to end up with only one thin coat at the edge of the repair. You want to spread out your laps in other words.  You could also do a little wet sanding and polishing around the blend lines to help the paint blend into the gelcoat.  A tiny HVLP spray gun might also work well in doing these touchup areas but it takes a little practice.

   I am not really sure how to properly prepare the Faux-teak gelcoat surface for paint since you are wanting to retain the wood grain effect.  Sandpaper will tend to flatten the surface so the only other option I have used are the Maroon Scotchbrite pads which you can compress into the low areas to scratch all surfaces.  The surface really needs to be freshly scratched everywhere to get a decent bond. Awl grip is supposed to be applied over a primer such as the 545 but white or gray are your only options so will complicate patching.   I have found that the Awlgrip topcoats actually have great adhesion to a prepared surface as rule so if I try patching I will omit the primer.  

  Glad to hear that you like the Awlgrip on your hull.

Best of luck with the patching, please let me know what seems to work for you.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Mar 8, 2019, at 4:03 PM, Jose Venegas via Groups.Io < josegvenegas@...> wrote:

James,

Thanks for your info.  When I had Ipanema's hull done with Awl grip 5 years ago, the also covered the non-skid sections of the stern, making them quite skiddy.  I complained and they added an extra layer with a few grains of sand or something like that which made the better.  However, I did not like the look of it compared with the original finish.  Because Ipanemas Faux-teak is in general good, after what you tell me I will try to get some thinner paint to have a few touches in the areas where it is missing, hopefully not reducing too much the pattern.
Interested in finding out if people have used other methods to deal with the problem

By the way, the hull painted wit Awl grip still looks shining after more than 5 years and with very little work.  I will use it on the deck when ready to do it in a year or two

Jose 
Ipanema SM2K 278



 


 


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Jose Venegas
 

Nick,
That is a clever idea!
Maybe I can make a surface mold with caramel and put it in contact with a newly painted section before it has hardened.  Once hard, I will wash it away with water, or use it to sweeten my coffee  ;)   Seriously, I have been thinking of making a surface mold that could be peeled off and your idea of sugar or any water soluble substance could be the answer.
I will keep you informed.
Jose
Ipanema SM2K 278


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Jose Venegas
 

James,
You are precise, the areas that I saw missing the paint appeared as if they had been brushed painted and the surface was still the same as the rest.  That made me think that they had been painted before. but I guess they just had a thin layer of gel coat when new.  For now, I will proceed with redoing the stripes and ignore the few regions of missing paint.

Thanks Again

Jose
Ipanema SM2K 278
Boston


Re: Tunesia

Gerhard Mueller
 

I have been for 6 years in Tunesia, mostly Monastir, and left last year.
Sidi Bou Said is a very picturesque village but the marina is mostly crowded by better situated Tunesians with motorboats from Tunis.
Marina de Gammarth is quite new and pretty nice. But for shopping you will need a Taxi to La Marsa. Taxi is cheap however.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Brent Cameron
 

That puts new meaning to the term “Sweet boat!”  

Brent Cameron, Future SM2K owner

--
Brent Cameron

Future Super Maramu 2000 Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Tunesia

James Alton
 

Joerg,

    We were in Tunisia Sept. Of 2018.  Bizerte, Kelibia, Hammanet, Monastir.  My wife and I felt safe in all locations.  Monastir has a large number of liveaboards and we met many interesting cruisers.  Marina staff is very friendly and accommodating.  Most things that you need are close by.  We enjoyed Bizerte as well Hammanet is modern,touristy but still nice.  Kelibia is a small fishing port with little room.  We taxied to Tunis (very cheap) to see the Bardo Museum but did not bring the boat.  Officials checked our paperwork at each port and anchoring is discouraged but we did anchor out some. Tunisia has a trash problem but we found the people to be honest and friendly.  If there are any other questions that you think I can answer about Tunisia let me know.  Our boat is US flagged, no issues.  Tunisia apparently was the first country to recognize US indepence and has had good relations.   Best, James Sv Sueno,. Maramu #220.

On Mar 9, 2019 10:03 AM, "Joerg Esdorn via Groups.Io" <jhe1313@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

I would like to sail my A55 to Tunesia in May and am looking at 2 ports near Tunis.  Sidi Bou Said or Marina de Gammarth.  Anybody have any recent experience with either port?  I’m particularly concerned about safety and space/sufficient water for a boat of this size. My boat is US flagged.  Many thanks for any input you can provide!

Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53
Kincsem


Re: Dive cylinder fill compressor.

Theo s/v Paloma
 
Edited

On my yet to be delivered Amel 50, Amel is installing the 230V Bauer JR II. I've had it on my previous boat also and it worked well. It needs lots of ventilation if in hot climate. Just remember to buy TONS of air filters as they don't last long at all (something like 8-10 tank fills each, if I remember correctly) .

Theo.
Amel 50 #18


Tunesia

Joerg Esdorn
 
Edited

I would like to sail my A55 to Tunesia in May and am looking at 2 ports near Tunis.  Sidi Bou Said or Marina de Gammarth.  Anybody have any recent experience with either port?  I’m particularly concerned about safety and space/sufficient water for a boat of this size. My boat is US flagged.  Many thanks for any input you can provide!

Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53
Kincsem


Maramu anchor and chain suggestions

James Alton
 

Hello Maramu owners,

I am not at my boat currently so need some help. Can Maramu owners suggest modern anchors that are known to fit the original Amel anchor rollers on the Maramu? I would like to upgrade from the original Bugel anchor to something with a bit better holding. The Mantus, Spade and the Rocna are of interest to me. I am concerned about the tendency of the anchor to strike the bow when being stowed and how well the anchor stows in the original Amel hardware.

I am also planing to increase the chain length to at least 100 meters. Has anyone switched to high strength (I believe it is grade 80?) 8mm chain to help keep the weight and the chain piles down as compared to the 10mm? I am not concerned about not being able to regalvanize the chain which I understand can weaken the grade 80.

Short term cruising will be Croatia and Greece. Hope to be in the Pacific in 4-5 years and I seem to recall suggestions to consider even more than 100 meters of chain?

Thanks for any insight and suggestions.

James

SV Sueno
Maramu #220


Re: Dive cylinder fill compressor.

Mark Erdos
 

H Danny,

 

It is a Junior II by Bauer: https://www.bauer-kompressoren.de/products/breathing-air-sports/compact-line-100-140-lmin/junior-ii-100-lmin/

 

We have this on Cream Puff and was installed by Amel. The installation has the unit sitting on a sliding tray so you can take advantage of some storage when the unit is push far to port in the locker out of use.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2019 3:45 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Dive cylinder fill compressor.

 

Hi all,

when we bought Ocean Pearl the previous owner had removed the dive compressor. I would like to add this now. (belatedly) having finally moved from the must have list to the nice to have list. What make and model did Amel install and any other advice gratefully received. The 230 volt wiring is in place in the large cockpit  port locker.

Thanks in advance

Danny

SM 299 

Ocean Pearl


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

ngtnewington Newington
 

Non Slip Paint

Many years ago on my first boat, "Faith of Norfolk” I was fed up with the teak deck. So I ripped it all up. It had been laid over ply which was still sound. To cut a long story short; after glassing the ply with epoxy and filling and fairing I was left with a blank canvas. I wanted a good even non skid surface, but being up the Lumut river in Malaysia 1993 with minimal materials to hand and certainly no chandlers even if I had any money, I used sugar.

I split the non skid area up into do-able zones, well prepped and masked. using some pale grey epoxy primer paint, I wetted out the area and then using a sieve sprinkled the sugar on the wet paint until it was evenly covered. Once dry I washed it all off really well making sure that no sugar was left. This I tested by licking the deck! The result was that the sugar created tiny volcanoes in the paint that were very grippy. Too grippy/ quite sharp but then when over painted with the finish paint came out just right.

It is an unconventional approach but has many advantages, not least being sandable. I suggest trying it out on a piece of board.

Nick

Amelia (54 hull 019)

On 8 Mar 2019, at 23:23, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Jose,

   When you say that the Faux-teak is missing in places do those thin areas look white by chance? If so closely by feel deck where you have the white areas and you may find that the wood grain texture exists in these areas, they are just the wrong colour.  In looking at my boat, I am pretty certain that Amel brushed the gel coat into the mold for the Faux teak colour and then sprayed the rest of the deck mold with the white gel coat that we see on the areas outside of the Faux teak area.   This makes sense from a production standpoint because to spray the Faux-teak area would require masking off the entire deck mold except for the Faux-teak area..a lot of extra work.  It is really hard to brush gel coat to a  perfectly even thickness  so perfectly normal to have some thinner areas.  These thin areas look on my boat like brush marks because actually they are, only from the reverse side. (grin)  The only point I wanted to make was that on my boat at least, enough white gel coat was sprayed over the top of the Faux Teak gel coat that despite the Faux-Teak colour being thin in places, the fibreglass is well covered and protected.  So I view this as just a cosmetic issue so pretty low down on my to do list currently.  

  You can certainly experiment with patching in the Faux-teak colour where it is missing.  I have not yet tried touching up my decks using the ideas that follow so your mileage may vary but I have done similar touchups on some other projects.  Unfortunately the results I have obtained are never as good as the original but there has always been improvement..  I would suggest getting a flattening agent for your Awlgrip to reduce the gloss and improve the traction some.  You will need to experiment with how much to add to get your best match.  The paint will need to be dry to know for sure how it will look. Go for a bit too shiny as the trend will be for the Awlgrip to flatten more over time.    As you found out, super shiny Awlgrip is really slippery stuff.  

  I wish that I could suggest an anti-slip additive for painted surfaces but I have not really found one that I like much and I have tried more than a dozen over the years.  Sand does work great for nonskid but it is too hard to sand down with normal sandpaper so when the time comes to recoat you have a problem.  Sand also has a colour so will show up as the paint wears down or chips off of the sand bits and this is the problem with many of the other additives.  We have had good luck using glass beads to varnish.  These tiny beads are added to the paint used for reflective stripping on the roads.  With (Including the Awlgrip /Awlbrite varnish) varnish, the glass beads disappear visually though the non-skid texture remains.  You can also sand them down when the time comes which is a little confusing since I would think that glass would be too hard to sand too but it does work.  I have not tried the glass beads with the Awlgrip paint but it might be worth doing a small test panel to see if you like it or not.  The fine Awlgrip non-skid additive will hold up the best of the additives they sell.  The more coarse Awlgrip additives become very slippery over time as the paint sticks poorly to the plastic bits so eventually you end up walking on the exposed plastic bits as the paint chips off.  I developed a technique where I thicken the Awlgrip and apply it with a roller.  It makes the best non skid I have walked on to date but it would completely cover you wood grain. 

   If you go to the Awlgrip.com website and click on colours at the top of the page, you will see the option to have custom colours created.  Awl grip can be applied in thin coats which you can use to your advantage in blending the paint to the Faux-Teak gel coat.  Build up thin coats  as needed to cover your thin areas and then enlarge the patched area with additional coats to end up with only one thin coat at the edge of the repair. You want to spread out your laps in other words.  You could also do a little wet sanding and polishing around the blend lines to help the paint blend into the gelcoat.  A tiny HVLP spray gun might also work well in doing these touchup areas but it takes a little practice.

   I am not really sure how to properly prepare the Faux-teak gelcoat surface for paint since you are wanting to retain the wood grain effect.  Sandpaper will tend to flatten the surface so the only other option I have used are the Maroon Scotchbrite pads which you can compress into the low areas to scratch all surfaces.  The surface really needs to be freshly scratched everywhere to get a decent bond. Awl grip is supposed to be applied over a primer such as the 545 but white or gray are your only options so will complicate patching.   I have found that the Awlgrip topcoats actually have great adhesion to a prepared surface as rule so if I try patching I will omit the primer.  

  Glad to hear that you like the Awlgrip on your hull.

Best of luck with the patching, please let me know what seems to work for you.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Mar 8, 2019, at 4:03 PM, Jose Venegas via Groups.Io <josegvenegas@...> wrote:

James,

Thanks for your info.  When I had Ipanema's hull done with Awl grip 5 years ago, the also covered the non-skid sections of the stern, making them quite skiddy.  I complained and they added an extra layer with a few grains of sand or something like that which made the better.  However, I did not like the look of it compared with the original finish.  Because Ipanemas Faux-teak is in general good, after what you tell me I will try to get some thinner paint to have a few touches in the areas where it is missing, hopefully not reducing too much the pattern.
Interested in finding out if people have used other methods to deal with the problem

By the way, the hull painted wit Awl grip still looks shining after more than 5 years and with very little work.  I will use it on the deck when ready to do it in a year or two

Jose 
Ipanema SM2K 278



Dive cylinder fill compressor.

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi all,

when we bought Ocean Pearl the previous owner had removed the dive compressor. I would like to add this now. (belatedly) having finally moved from the must have list to the nice to have list. What make and model did Amel install and any other advice gratefully received. The 230 volt wiring is in place in the large cockpit  port locker.

Thanks in advance

Danny

SM 299 

Ocean Pearl


Re: Hawse Pipe Replacement

David Wallace
 

I'm late to this topic but following Craig's lead also replaced the hawse pipe with a pvc tube. When I cut out the remains of the corroded original part I still had 1-2” of perfectly good pipe on the top and bottom. So I cut the pvc to fit the gap as close as possible and then used a PVC DWV Mechanical Coupling (Home Depot) at each end to hold the tube in place and provide a watertight seal. As far as I can determine, I have no issue with windlass movement but will certainly keep checking for that.

Dave Wallace
s/v Air Ops
Maramu 104
Sea of Cortez


On Mar 7, 2019, at 11:57 AM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Hi Gary et al,

The bolt in question is the starboard aft position. Without it in place and the winch loaded up the whole winch moved so it isn't a question of where was the deck flexing. The body of the winch, without that bolt was bring pulled to lean forward. It was particularly noticeable when breaking the anchor free. I have no reason to believe there was any other cause and I noted once again the Captains attention to detail in not relying on a GRP deck but adding the certain strength of the bolt through the flange onto the hawse pipe. With that bolt in place movement is NIL and has been so for many years. So again I commend caution and attention to this detail when choosing a repair system. The load on the anchor winch can at times be considerable, we are not always anchored in calm water on a clean bottom with little wind.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl


With On 08 March 2019 at 08:07 "Gary Silver via Groups.Io" <garysilver@...> wrote:

Hi Danny:

Thanks for that re-iteration.  Can you describe in more detail where the deck was flexing?  Was it just at the bolt location or over a wider area?  The deck is stiffened also by the vertical fore-aft wall between the port and starboard sides.   Was the tab on the hawse pipe acting merely as a backing plate or was it the fiberglass collar with the hawse pipe as an assemblage that provided stiffening. 

I remember years ago Joel warned against attaching an inner forestay to the cleat on the winch or to the decking in that area without carrying the loads down to tougher structure.  

Thanks for any additional insight you might provide. 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona 
Amel SM 2000 #335


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

James Alton
 

Jose,

   When you say that the Faux-teak is missing in places do those thin areas look white by chance? If so closely by feel deck where you have the white areas and you may find that the wood grain texture exists in these areas, they are just the wrong colour.  In looking at my boat, I am pretty certain that Amel brushed the gel coat into the mold for the Faux teak colour and then sprayed the rest of the deck mold with the white gel coat that we see on the areas outside of the Faux teak area.   This makes sense from a production standpoint because to spray the Faux-teak area would require masking off the entire deck mold except for the Faux-teak area..a lot of extra work.  It is really hard to brush gel coat to a  perfectly even thickness  so perfectly normal to have some thinner areas.  These thin areas look on my boat like brush marks because actually they are, only from the reverse side. (grin)  The only point I wanted to make was that on my boat at least, enough white gel coat was sprayed over the top of the Faux Teak gel coat that despite the Faux-Teak colour being thin in places, the fibreglass is well covered and protected.  So I view this as just a cosmetic issue so pretty low down on my to do list currently.  

  You can certainly experiment with patching in the Faux-teak colour where it is missing.  I have not yet tried touching up my decks using the ideas that follow so your mileage may vary but I have done similar touchups on some other projects.  Unfortunately the results I have obtained are never as good as the original but there has always been improvement..  I would suggest getting a flattening agent for your Awlgrip to reduce the gloss and improve the traction some.  You will need to experiment with how much to add to get your best match.  The paint will need to be dry to know for sure how it will look. Go for a bit too shiny as the trend will be for the Awlgrip to flatten more over time.    As you found out, super shiny Awlgrip is really slippery stuff.  

  I wish that I could suggest an anti-slip additive for painted surfaces but I have not really found one that I like much and I have tried more than a dozen over the years.  Sand does work great for nonskid but it is too hard to sand down with normal sandpaper so when the time comes to recoat you have a problem.  Sand also has a colour so will show up as the paint wears down or chips off of the sand bits and this is the problem with many of the other additives.  We have had good luck using glass beads to varnish.  These tiny beads are added to the paint used for reflective stripping on the roads.  With (Including the Awlgrip /Awlbrite varnish) varnish, the glass beads disappear visually though the non-skid texture remains.  You can also sand them down when the time comes which is a little confusing since I would think that glass would be too hard to sand too but it does work.  I have not tried the glass beads with the Awlgrip paint but it might be worth doing a small test panel to see if you like it or not.  The fine Awlgrip non-skid additive will hold up the best of the additives they sell.  The more coarse Awlgrip additives become very slippery over time as the paint sticks poorly to the plastic bits so eventually you end up walking on the exposed plastic bits as the paint chips off.  I developed a technique where I thicken the Awlgrip and apply it with a roller.  It makes the best non skid I have walked on to date but it would completely cover you wood grain. 

   If you go to the Awlgrip.com website and click on colours at the top of the page, you will see the option to have custom colours created.  Awl grip can be applied in thin coats which you can use to your advantage in blending the paint to the Faux-Teak gel coat.  Build up thin coats  as needed to cover your thin areas and then enlarge the patched area with additional coats to end up with only one thin coat at the edge of the repair. You want to spread out your laps in other words.  You could also do a little wet sanding and polishing around the blend lines to help the paint blend into the gelcoat.  A tiny HVLP spray gun might also work well in doing these touchup areas but it takes a little practice.

   I am not really sure how to properly prepare the Faux-teak gelcoat surface for paint since you are wanting to retain the wood grain effect.  Sandpaper will tend to flatten the surface so the only other option I have used are the Maroon Scotchbrite pads which you can compress into the low areas to scratch all surfaces.  The surface really needs to be freshly scratched everywhere to get a decent bond. Awl grip is supposed to be applied over a primer such as the 545 but white or gray are your only options so will complicate patching.   I have found that the Awlgrip topcoats actually have great adhesion to a prepared surface as rule so if I try patching I will omit the primer.  

  Glad to hear that you like the Awlgrip on your hull.

Best of luck with the patching, please let me know what seems to work for you.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Mar 8, 2019, at 4:03 PM, Jose Venegas via Groups.Io <josegvenegas@...> wrote:

James,

Thanks for your info.  When I had Ipanema's hull done with Awl grip 5 years ago, the also covered the non-skid sections of the stern, making them quite skiddy.  I complained and they added an extra layer with a few grains of sand or something like that which made the better.  However, I did not like the look of it compared with the original finish.  Because Ipanemas Faux-teak is in general good, after what you tell me I will try to get some thinner paint to have a few touches in the areas where it is missing, hopefully not reducing too much the pattern.
Interested in finding out if people have used other methods to deal with the problem

By the way, the hull painted wit Awl grip still looks shining after more than 5 years and with very little work.  I will use it on the deck when ready to do it in a year or two

Jose 
Ipanema SM2K 278


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Craig Briggs
 

Hey Jose,
I've got the same issue on Sangaris, with the original faux teak wearing off and showing brush strokes.  From a prior life I recall there's an attribute of paint called "bridging". That's the paint's ability to fill in uneven surfaces. 

There are also "anti-bridging" paints that don't fill in the surfaces, although they are mostly for acoustical applications.  So, that's more than I know about the subject, but I wonder if anyone listening might have a PhD in the subject, or, better yet, have done it. I'd love to get a "Non-bridging" paint to redo my decks so as to keep the non-skid properties. If you think about it, that's kind of like keeping the acoustical properties of a surface.

Best, Craig Briggs SN68 Sangaris


Re: Bow locker floor replacement.....

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Thomas, 

No, I didn't reinforce under the floor. That thin tabbing from the original floor, which I ground back to be about 2" wide, really provides tremendous strength - after all it was all that Amel relied upon in the original construction. With the new floor just about touching the hull sides, it gets huge purchase on the old "thin" tab and, since the hull slants inward under it, any downward force is really disbursed nicely into the hull sides. Actually, when that had cured, I knew I had a good structure, even before I filleted and tabbed in on the top side of the floor.

So now I've got essentially the the full strength of the original Amel structure, plus yet another identical structure on top of the floor. Jumping up and down on it, albeit just anecdotal evidence, tells me this sucker is REALLY strong (and, I lost my girlish figure long ago!).  So that's my story and I'm stickin' to it!

Cheers, Craig Briggs, SN68 


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Jose Venegas
 

James,

Thanks for your info.  When I had Ipanema's hull done with Awl grip 5 years ago, the also covered the non-skid sections of the stern, making them quite skiddy.  I complained and they added an extra layer with a few grains of sand or something like that which made the better.  However, I did not like the look of it compared with the original finish.  Because Ipanemas Faux-teak is in general good, after what you tell me I will try to get some thinner paint to have a few touches in the areas where it is missing, hopefully not reducing too much the pattern.
Interested in finding out if people have used other methods to deal with the problem

By the way, the hull painted wit Awl grip still looks shining after more than 5 years and with very little work.  I will use it on the deck when ready to do it in a year or two

Jose 
Ipanema SM2K 278


Re: Bow locker floor replacement.....

James Alton
 

Thomas,

   Glad to see that you are getting some good direction from Craig.  I would definitely take his advice about pre glassing the bottom of the panels.  I would only suggest that:

1.  If you are going to use plywood again to do everything that you can to seal all edges, holes to prevent water from getting in there again.  
2.  I think that it is most cost effective to spend some money up front and use a high quality marine plywood of a wood species that has a “durable” rating. Some options would be a solid core Sapele,  Fir (be sure all plys are Fir, often only the faces are Fir these days, Bruyneel etc. so that you have rot resistant wood that will last quite a while even after the water gets in. (the anchor locker is a perpetually wet environment when the boat is in use without doing a lot of work so eventually water will get in)   Any of these quality plywoods should have a waterproof glue but be absolutely sure that at the minimum you have an exterior rating.  Many of the best Marine plywoods will bear the Loyds stamp.

Best of luck with your project,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Mar 8, 2019, at 11:32 AM, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

Day 1 of the bow locker floor replacement. I'm reminded of the elder Moltke's tenet that no plan survives first contact with the enemy. As I cut the port bow locker's floor out, the 3 inch lip I was leaving to later mount the new floor on completely separated (wood from the fiberglass). Now there is only a 3 inch thin fiberglass lip with no plywood underneath it. There was no structure holding the plywood up from underneath along the port side. It seems to have been glassed/supported from the top only. When water penetrated the wood the fiberglass broke away. When the time comes to install the new floor, I suppose I will need to create the lip I thought would still be in place......thoughts ? 


Re: Bow locker floor replacement.....

Thomas Kleman
 

Craig- did you reinforce under the floor in any way or is all the hold coming from the sides and top tabbing (the thin fiberglass lip notwithstanding). I feel like I should have some kind of wedge shaped support underneath it but that might be overkill.....or can there be overkill on something like this ?