Date   

Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Heinz Stutenbaeumer
 

Dear Alan 
My Amel is also in New Sealand. 
Did the New Sealanders let you in? Iff so how did you do that? Can you write me an Mail please 
heinz@...
Thanks 
Heinz SM 2000, 292, SY Quetzal.



Am 14.05.2021 um 00:21 schrieb Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...>:

With all due respect, Amel didn't "design" the gear train, they only specified it.
Both the Leroy Somer and Bongifoli(?) units are standard production industrial motor gearbox units used in factories for example as conveyor drivers.
They are nothing special.
And there are plenty of alternatives out there.

Cheers 
Alan
Elyse SM437
On my way to New Zealand today to be reunited with my beautiful boat after more than a year !


Re: Warning about "UFOs"

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Eric. Is that a typo or is it a saying Im not familiar with.

Regards

Danny 

On 14 May 2021 at 09:29 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Can’t Hoit !!

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2021 3:31 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Warning about "UFOs"

 

Hi Eric, that impact would have sunk a lesser boat. I have no idea if it is sensible but I run my forward looking sonar at sea, not expecting to see a whale ahead but that the sonar may warn a whale of my approach. Foolish? Don' know but I've never hit a whale 

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 14 May 2021 at 03:54 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

While Sailing West of Africa towards the Caribbean we were surfing down the waves in the Trade Winds using our gennaker one day we averaged 10 knots.

At first, I did not see it, But I hit a whale in the middle of its body. It stopped us dead and I heard it hit the boat twice. I assume it first hit the bow and then the keel,

The stop was so sudden that one crewmember flew from the saloon to the forward berth without injury.

I started the engine to warn any other whales. We were checking the bilges but based upon the configuration that would be of little help.

 

As the whale went by it was much bigger than Kimberlite. I looked it in the eye, and it seemed to give me a dirty look, I also think he flipped me the flipper.

The seas were large so I could not dive at that time. 2 days later I dove on the boat and everything was where it was supposed to be and now after 15 years everything is still AOK.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: Wednesday, May 12, 2021 1:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Warning about "UFOs"

 

Just a word of reassurance.  This topic is one that comes up all the time, and is passed around the sailing world and it seems to grow larger and more panicked with each telling. It's is a great boogy-man story because it has the evil, greedy shipping companies as the villains and the poor smallboat sailor as the helpless victim.

All I can do is give my personnel take on the topic as someone who has been intimately connected with the sailing world for several decades. Ignoring press stories, and scuttlebutt that starts with "I heard about a guy...", and staying with things I know first hand.  Your experience might be different, so, here goes: I HAVE seen many things floating on the ocean that I would NOT want to hit, most of them large trees, or pieces of lumber. But...

  • In 10's of thousands of ocean miles sailing I have NEVER seen a container in the ocean.  
  • NEVER have I seen one wash up on a beach. If there were a significant number of them floating in the ocean surely this would happen?
  • NEVER have I talked to anyone who has actually, first hand, seen a container floating in the ocean or washed up on a beach.
  • NEVER have I heard from someone who actually can confirm they hit a floating container.  
  • I know of just one boat that hit an unidentified floating object, at night in the middle of the ocean but what it hit was just that, unidentified.  
  • Never have I hit a container at sea.

On the other hand, I know personally of two boats that sunk after hitting whales, and two others that were disabled after whale strikes. I have been on a boat that hit a whale, thankfully without consequences.  By my reckoning, whales are at least 50 times more dangerous to small boats than shipping containers, and the risk of boats hitting reefs are at least 50 times higher again.

It is human nature to feel that risks we have no control over are much higher than those things were we think we can control. This is why many people have a fear of flying, but not of driving a car, even though the risk presented in an automobile is many times higher. We, quite rightly, feel that there is very little or nothing we can do ourselves to mitigate the risk of a collision with a container at sea.  This lack of control of the risk causes us to greatly inflate the relative risk of the event.

I am not saying that hitting a container is impossible, but the risks are WAY WAY down on the list of things we deal with at sea.  The risk does not deserve the number of words written about it over the years. (Even though I just added to them!)

 

 


 


 

 



 


 


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hey Alan, 

Good for you!

Other than a long beard, the batteries are ok, the water tank should have water. 

We are doing a maintenance cycle and will be on G17 tomorrow AM. 

JP


On 14/05/2021, at 10:21 AM, Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:

With all due respect, Amel didn't "design" the gear train, they only specified it.
Both the Leroy Somer and Bongifoli(?) units are standard production industrial motor gearbox units used in factories for example as conveyor drivers.
They are nothing special.
And there are plenty of alternatives out there.

Cheers 
Alan
Elyse SM437
On my way to New Zealand today to be reunited with my beautiful boat after more than a year !


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Alan Leslie
 

With all due respect, Amel didn't "design" the gear train, they only specified it.
Both the Leroy Somer and Bongifoli(?) units are standard production industrial motor gearbox units used in factories for example as conveyor drivers.
They are nothing special.
And there are plenty of alternatives out there.

Cheers 
Alan
Elyse SM437
On my way to New Zealand today to be reunited with my beautiful boat after more than a year !


Re: Warning about "UFOs"

eric freedman
 

Can’t Hoit !!

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2021 3:31 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Warning about "UFOs"

 

Hi Eric, that impact would have sunk a lesser boat. I have no idea if it is sensible but I run my forward looking sonar at sea, not expecting to see a whale ahead but that the sonar may warn a whale of my approach. Foolish? Don' know but I've never hit a whale 

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 14 May 2021 at 03:54 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

While Sailing West of Africa towards the Caribbean we were surfing down the waves in the Trade Winds using our gennaker one day we averaged 10 knots.

At first, I did not see it, But I hit a whale in the middle of its body. It stopped us dead and I heard it hit the boat twice. I assume it first hit the bow and then the keel,

The stop was so sudden that one crewmember flew from the saloon to the forward berth without injury.

I started the engine to warn any other whales. We were checking the bilges but based upon the configuration that would be of little help.

 

As the whale went by it was much bigger than Kimberlite. I looked it in the eye, and it seemed to give me a dirty look, I also think he flipped me the flipper.

The seas were large so I could not dive at that time. 2 days later I dove on the boat and everything was where it was supposed to be and now after 15 years everything is still AOK.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: Wednesday, May 12, 2021 1:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Warning about "UFOs"

 

Just a word of reassurance.  This topic is one that comes up all the time, and is passed around the sailing world and it seems to grow larger and more panicked with each telling. It's is a great boogy-man story because it has the evil, greedy shipping companies as the villains and the poor smallboat sailor as the helpless victim.

All I can do is give my personnel take on the topic as someone who has been intimately connected with the sailing world for several decades. Ignoring press stories, and scuttlebutt that starts with "I heard about a guy...", and staying with things I know first hand.  Your experience might be different, so, here goes: I HAVE seen many things floating on the ocean that I would NOT want to hit, most of them large trees, or pieces of lumber. But...

  • In 10's of thousands of ocean miles sailing I have NEVER seen a container in the ocean.  
  • NEVER have I seen one wash up on a beach. If there were a significant number of them floating in the ocean surely this would happen?
  • NEVER have I talked to anyone who has actually, first hand, seen a container floating in the ocean or washed up on a beach.
  • NEVER have I heard from someone who actually can confirm they hit a floating container.  
  • I know of just one boat that hit an unidentified floating object, at night in the middle of the ocean but what it hit was just that, unidentified.  
  • Never have I hit a container at sea.

On the other hand, I know personally of two boats that sunk after hitting whales, and two others that were disabled after whale strikes. I have been on a boat that hit a whale, thankfully without consequences.  By my reckoning, whales are at least 50 times more dangerous to small boats than shipping containers, and the risk of boats hitting reefs are at least 50 times higher again.

It is human nature to feel that risks we have no control over are much higher than those things were we think we can control. This is why many people have a fear of flying, but not of driving a car, even though the risk presented in an automobile is many times higher. We, quite rightly, feel that there is very little or nothing we can do ourselves to mitigate the risk of a collision with a container at sea.  This lack of control of the risk causes us to greatly inflate the relative risk of the event.

I am not saying that hitting a container is impossible, but the risks are WAY WAY down on the list of things we deal with at sea.  The risk does not deserve the number of words written about it over the years. (Even though I just added to them!)

 

 


 


 


Re: Warning about "UFOs"

Peter Killen
 

Hi All,

Some years ago we were en route from SW Ireland to the Azores. 
Conditions were not great, with a fairly big sea running and very misty. 
We were about 600 miles from our destination and didn’t see the container, which had only one corner awash, and covered in seaweed, poking up out of the sea, until we were about 50 metres abeam of it. A nasty surprise!

We sailed approximately 80k miles in Pure Magic, and many more miles in other boats, but never had a similar incident before or since. 

Peter

Previous owner of SM Pure Magic  433



On 13 May 2021, at 20:31, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:



Hi Eric, that impact would have sunk a lesser boat. I have no idea if it is sensible but I run my forward looking sonar at sea, not expecting to see a whale ahead but that the sonar may warn a whale of my approach. Foolish? Don' know but I've never hit a whale 

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 14 May 2021 at 03:54 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

While Sailing West of Africa towards the Caribbean we were surfing down the waves in the Trade Winds using our gennaker one day we averaged 10 knots.

At first, I did not see it, But I hit a whale in the middle of its body. It stopped us dead and I heard it hit the boat twice. I assume it first hit the bow and then the keel,

The stop was so sudden that one crewmember flew from the saloon to the forward berth without injury.

I started the engine to warn any other whales. We were checking the bilges but based upon the configuration that would be of little help.

 

As the whale went by it was much bigger than Kimberlite. I looked it in the eye, and it seemed to give me a dirty look, I also think he flipped me the flipper.

The seas were large so I could not dive at that time. 2 days later I dove on the boat and everything was where it was supposed to be and now after 15 years everything is still AOK.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: Wednesday, May 12, 2021 1:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Warning about "UFOs"

 

Just a word of reassurance.  This topic is one that comes up all the time, and is passed around the sailing world and it seems to grow larger and more panicked with each telling. It's is a great boogy-man story because it has the evil, greedy shipping companies as the villains and the poor smallboat sailor as the helpless victim.

All I can do is give my personnel take on the topic as someone who has been intimately connected with the sailing world for several decades. Ignoring press stories, and scuttlebutt that starts with "I heard about a guy...", and staying with things I know first hand.  Your experience might be different, so, here goes: I HAVE seen many things floating on the ocean that I would NOT want to hit, most of them large trees, or pieces of lumber. But...

  • In 10's of thousands of ocean miles sailing I have NEVER seen a container in the ocean.  
  • NEVER have I seen one wash up on a beach. If there were a significant number of them floating in the ocean surely this would happen?
  • NEVER have I talked to anyone who has actually, first hand, seen a container floating in the ocean or washed up on a beach.
  • NEVER have I heard from someone who actually can confirm they hit a floating container.  
  • I know of just one boat that hit an unidentified floating object, at night in the middle of the ocean but what it hit was just that, unidentified.  
  • Never have I hit a container at sea.

On the other hand, I know personally of two boats that sunk after hitting whales, and two others that were disabled after whale strikes. I have been on a boat that hit a whale, thankfully without consequences.  By my reckoning, whales are at least 50 times more dangerous to small boats than shipping containers, and the risk of boats hitting reefs are at least 50 times higher again.

It is human nature to feel that risks we have no control over are much higher than those things were we think we can control. This is why many people have a fear of flying, but not of driving a car, even though the risk presented in an automobile is many times higher. We, quite rightly, feel that there is very little or nothing we can do ourselves to mitigate the risk of a collision with a container at sea.  This lack of control of the risk causes us to greatly inflate the relative risk of the event.

I am not saying that hitting a container is impossible, but the risks are WAY WAY down on the list of things we deal with at sea.  The risk does not deserve the number of words written about it over the years. (Even though I just added to them!)

 



 


 


Re: Warning about "UFOs"

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Eric, that impact would have sunk a lesser boat. I have no idea if it is sensible but I run my forward looking sonar at sea, not expecting to see a whale ahead but that the sonar may warn a whale of my approach. Foolish? Don' know but I've never hit a whale 

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 14 May 2021 at 03:54 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

While Sailing West of Africa towards the Caribbean we were surfing down the waves in the Trade Winds using our gennaker one day we averaged 10 knots.

At first, I did not see it, But I hit a whale in the middle of its body. It stopped us dead and I heard it hit the boat twice. I assume it first hit the bow and then the keel,

The stop was so sudden that one crewmember flew from the saloon to the forward berth without injury.

I started the engine to warn any other whales. We were checking the bilges but based upon the configuration that would be of little help.

 

As the whale went by it was much bigger than Kimberlite. I looked it in the eye, and it seemed to give me a dirty look, I also think he flipped me the flipper.

The seas were large so I could not dive at that time. 2 days later I dove on the boat and everything was where it was supposed to be and now after 15 years everything is still AOK.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: Wednesday, May 12, 2021 1:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Warning about "UFOs"

 

Just a word of reassurance.  This topic is one that comes up all the time, and is passed around the sailing world and it seems to grow larger and more panicked with each telling. It's is a great boogy-man story because it has the evil, greedy shipping companies as the villains and the poor smallboat sailor as the helpless victim.

All I can do is give my personnel take on the topic as someone who has been intimately connected with the sailing world for several decades. Ignoring press stories, and scuttlebutt that starts with "I heard about a guy...", and staying with things I know first hand.  Your experience might be different, so, here goes: I HAVE seen many things floating on the ocean that I would NOT want to hit, most of them large trees, or pieces of lumber. But...

  • In 10's of thousands of ocean miles sailing I have NEVER seen a container in the ocean.  
  • NEVER have I seen one wash up on a beach. If there were a significant number of them floating in the ocean surely this would happen?
  • NEVER have I talked to anyone who has actually, first hand, seen a container floating in the ocean or washed up on a beach.
  • NEVER have I heard from someone who actually can confirm they hit a floating container.  
  • I know of just one boat that hit an unidentified floating object, at night in the middle of the ocean but what it hit was just that, unidentified.  
  • Never have I hit a container at sea.

On the other hand, I know personally of two boats that sunk after hitting whales, and two others that were disabled after whale strikes. I have been on a boat that hit a whale, thankfully without consequences.  By my reckoning, whales are at least 50 times more dangerous to small boats than shipping containers, and the risk of boats hitting reefs are at least 50 times higher again.

It is human nature to feel that risks we have no control over are much higher than those things were we think we can control. This is why many people have a fear of flying, but not of driving a car, even though the risk presented in an automobile is many times higher. We, quite rightly, feel that there is very little or nothing we can do ourselves to mitigate the risk of a collision with a container at sea.  This lack of control of the risk causes us to greatly inflate the relative risk of the event.

I am not saying that hitting a container is impossible, but the risks are WAY WAY down on the list of things we deal with at sea.  The risk does not deserve the number of words written about it over the years. (Even though I just added to them!)

 



 


 


Re: New (and proud) owners of SY-Kolibri - #174

 

Wonderful. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Thu, May 13, 2021, 8:18 AM Roque <ediroque@...> wrote:
Hella and Herman

Welcome and enjoy Kolibri! 

Roque 

Attika A54 117
Paraty- Brazil 

Em qui., 13 de mai. de 2021 às 11:48, Courtney Gorman via groups.io <Itsfun1=aol.com@groups.io> escreveu:
Congratulations enjoy the adventure 👍🏻😁


On May 13, 2021, at 10:26 AM, Mark Garver via groups.io <mgarver=me.com@groups.io> wrote:

Welcome to a wonderful group of Amel owners and congratulations!

Mark and Jennifer Garver
S/V It’s Good
SM #105

On May 13, 2021, at 7:03 AM, Herman Goverse <h.goverse@...> wrote:

Hello all,

after looking at Super Maramu’s for years we have signed the contract on our Amel Super Maramu ‘Kolibri’. The great help and advise from Bill Rouse has been (and still is) of great value for us in the process of becoming Amel owners.


We believe Kolibri was well looked after and we will give some extra love and attention in the coming years before se set of on our great sailing adventure in the next years. 

Guess we will find some help and advise on this forum in our journey in sailing and maintaining Kolibri. 


Hella and Herman
--
SY-Kolibri - SM #174



Re: Warning about "UFOs"

eric freedman
 

While Sailing West of Africa towards the Caribbean we were surfing down the waves in the Trade Winds using our gennaker one day we averaged 10 knots.

At first, I did not see it, But I hit a whale in the middle of its body. It stopped us dead and I heard it hit the boat twice. I assume it first hit the bow and then the keel,

The stop was so sudden that one crewmember flew from the saloon to the forward berth without injury.

I started the engine to warn any other whales. We were checking the bilges but based upon the configuration that would be of little help.

 

As the whale went by it was much bigger than Kimberlite. I looked it in the eye, and it seemed to give me a dirty look, I also think he flipped me the flipper.

The seas were large so I could not dive at that time. 2 days later I dove on the boat and everything was where it was supposed to be and now after 15 years everything is still AOK.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: Wednesday, May 12, 2021 1:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Warning about "UFOs"

 

Just a word of reassurance.  This topic is one that comes up all the time, and is passed around the sailing world and it seems to grow larger and more panicked with each telling. It's is a great boogy-man story because it has the evil, greedy shipping companies as the villains and the poor smallboat sailor as the helpless victim.

All I can do is give my personnel take on the topic as someone who has been intimately connected with the sailing world for several decades. Ignoring press stories, and scuttlebutt that starts with "I heard about a guy...", and staying with things I know first hand.  Your experience might be different, so, here goes: I HAVE seen many things floating on the ocean that I would NOT want to hit, most of them large trees, or pieces of lumber. But...

  • In 10's of thousands of ocean miles sailing I have NEVER seen a container in the ocean.  
  • NEVER have I seen one wash up on a beach. If there were a significant number of them floating in the ocean surely this would happen?
  • NEVER have I talked to anyone who has actually, first hand, seen a container floating in the ocean or washed up on a beach.
  • NEVER have I heard from someone who actually can confirm they hit a floating container.  
  • I know of just one boat that hit an unidentified floating object, at night in the middle of the ocean but what it hit was just that, unidentified.  
  • Never have I hit a container at sea.

On the other hand, I know personally of two boats that sunk after hitting whales, and two others that were disabled after whale strikes. I have been on a boat that hit a whale, thankfully without consequences.  By my reckoning, whales are at least 50 times more dangerous to small boats than shipping containers, and the risk of boats hitting reefs are at least 50 times higher again.

It is human nature to feel that risks we have no control over are much higher than those things were we think we can control. This is why many people have a fear of flying, but not of driving a car, even though the risk presented in an automobile is many times higher. We, quite rightly, feel that there is very little or nothing we can do ourselves to mitigate the risk of a collision with a container at sea.  This lack of control of the risk causes us to greatly inflate the relative risk of the event.

I am not saying that hitting a container is impossible, but the risks are WAY WAY down on the list of things we deal with at sea.  The risk does not deserve the number of words written about it over the years. (Even though I just added to them!)


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia
 

When I pulled the outhaul motor and gearbox off of Talia back in Feb (before I pitched myself from the mizzen mast), the shaft was sheared before the first shaft step behind the keyway.  You can see the stress rings on the shear plane of the shaft.  They start at a single point.  I could not tell if it was corrosion, or an inclusion without polishing.  However, an inclusion on the surface of the shaft would be very odd.  I still have the motor and shaft, and will pass along a few pictures when I can get back to the boat in June.  I will see if I can polish the shear surface as well for fun.

Not sure I buy the wear on the gear teeth and side loading with a bonze tooth gearbox.  I fully expected to see wear on the teeth, following BWs book.  There was little to no wear presence and the tooth convolutes were clean and mirror like when washed down. 

I also can't reason AMEL designing a drivetrain where the gearbox is the failure mechanism .  No self respecting Mech Eng would do that.  Your coupling/keyway should fail first, followed by your easily changed electric motor.  I think AMEL has done a fine job designing this geartrain, and Gary did a great maintaining the boat prior to my owning it.  But, on this specific boat the motor shaft red herring failed.   


Re: Super Maramu length of the Long Pole

Bill Kinney
 

I suspect (but can not prove!) the reason of the change (we have the long poles) was simply to allow the securing the forward end of the pole to the pin on the stanchion without reworking the whole lifeline system.  With the long poles the forward end of the pole is captured in the liferail and while it can not escape, it certainly CAN bounce up and down.  We had some fiberglass crazing from this.  We added pads of Treadmaster to cushion the rail where the pole rests.

What I found interesting, is after shortening the poles by a half meter, there was no change in the size of the genoa or balloner.  Having sailed with both, I can't say I notice a difference.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood FL


Re: New (and proud) owners of SY-Kolibri - #174

Roque
 

Hella and Herman

Welcome and enjoy Kolibri! 

Roque 

Attika A54 117
Paraty- Brazil 

Em qui., 13 de mai. de 2021 às 11:48, Courtney Gorman via groups.io <Itsfun1=aol.com@groups.io> escreveu:

Congratulations enjoy the adventure 👍🏻😁


On May 13, 2021, at 10:26 AM, Mark Garver via groups.io <mgarver=me.com@groups.io> wrote:

Welcome to a wonderful group of Amel owners and congratulations!

Mark and Jennifer Garver
S/V It’s Good
SM #105

On May 13, 2021, at 7:03 AM, Herman Goverse <h.goverse@...> wrote:

Hello all,

after looking at Super Maramu’s for years we have signed the contract on our Amel Super Maramu ‘Kolibri’. The great help and advise from Bill Rouse has been (and still is) of great value for us in the process of becoming Amel owners.


We believe Kolibri was well looked after and we will give some extra love and attention in the coming years before se set of on our great sailing adventure in the next years. 

Guess we will find some help and advise on this forum in our journey in sailing and maintaining Kolibri. 


Hella and Herman
--
SY-Kolibri - SM #174



Re: New (and proud) owners of SY-Kolibri - #174

Courtney Gorman
 

Congratulations enjoy the adventure 👍🏻😁


On May 13, 2021, at 10:26 AM, Mark Garver via groups.io <mgarver@...> wrote:

Welcome to a wonderful group of Amel owners and congratulations!

Mark and Jennifer Garver
S/V It’s Good
SM #105

On May 13, 2021, at 7:03 AM, Herman Goverse <h.goverse@...> wrote:

Hello all,

after looking at Super Maramu’s for years we have signed the contract on our Amel Super Maramu ‘Kolibri’. The great help and advise from Bill Rouse has been (and still is) of great value for us in the process of becoming Amel owners.


We believe Kolibri was well looked after and we will give some extra love and attention in the coming years before se set of on our great sailing adventure in the next years. 

Guess we will find some help and advise on this forum in our journey in sailing and maintaining Kolibri. 


Hella and Herman
--
SY-Kolibri - SM #174



Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Bill Kinney
 

I think "stress corrosion cracking" is a red herring here.  While carbon steel certainly can corrode rapidly in salt water, the chemistry just is not the same as with stainless alloys that stress crack in the presence of chloride.  If there was enough salt water bouncing around in the motor housing to seriously corrode the shaft, I would expect LOTS of other issues to go south first!  This would be easy to confirm with a look at a sheared-off shaft.  (Anybody have a photo?)

In normal operation the motor simply can not develop enough torque to shear off the shaft.  I have certainly stalled the outhaul motor many times while flattening the sail without a mechanical failure. While it might be possible that there was an epidemic of bad steel bar stock for motor shafts, this seems very unlikely.  

I have never done a post-mortem on one of these that has failed, so all this is a guess... There are two possibilities I see, both related to wear in the gear box.  

A worn or broken bearing could allow enough runout of the worm screw that it imparts a significant side loading on the motor shaft.  This could result in a failure of the kind seen.  I think this is the most likely cause.

Another possibility is either by wear of the gear teeth, or a bearing failure, the worm suddenly jams in the gear while running at speed.  I can imagine this kind of shock loading causing a shear failure. I don't see this happening by an external load, the 60:1 gear ratio would just not transmit enough of a shock load back to the motor--but you never know...

Again, all just SWAG (Scientific Wild Ass Guessing) without having a failed unit in hand.

It also appears incorrect to say that older boats had Bonfiglioli and new ones had Leroy-Somers drive trains (or vice versa).  Amel seems to have switched back and forth during the production run.  Our boat (#160) has Leroy-Somers, and I have seen higher hull numbers with either supplier.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL


Re: New (and proud) owners of SY-Kolibri - #174

Mark Garver
 

Welcome to a wonderful group of Amel owners and congratulations!

Mark and Jennifer Garver
S/V It’s Good
SM #105

On May 13, 2021, at 7:03 AM, Herman Goverse <h.goverse@...> wrote:

Hello all,

after looking at Super Maramu’s for years we have signed the contract on our Amel Super Maramu ‘Kolibri’. The great help and advise from Bill Rouse has been (and still is) of great value for us in the process of becoming Amel owners.


We believe Kolibri was well looked after and we will give some extra love and attention in the coming years before se set of on our great sailing adventure in the next years. 

Guess we will find some help and advise on this forum in our journey in sailing and maintaining Kolibri. 


Hella and Herman
--
SY-Kolibri - SM #174



New (and proud) owners of SY-Kolibri - #174

Herman Goverse
 

Hello all,

after looking at Super Maramu’s for years we have signed the contract on our Amel Super Maramu ‘Kolibri’. The great help and advise from Bill Rouse has been (and still is) of great value for us in the process of becoming Amel owners.


We believe Kolibri was well looked after and we will give some extra love and attention in the coming years before se set of on our great sailing adventure in the next years. 

Guess we will find some help and advise on this forum in our journey in sailing and maintaining Kolibri. 


Hella and Herman
--
SY-Kolibri - SM #174


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia
 

Most electric motors use mild steel shafts (I doubt the electric motors on the AMEL have nickel or nickel-vanadium shafts due to cost).  The shafts are designed for an infinite life in a controlled environment, given the design torque of the motor/stator.  We have all seen how mild steel can corrode in sodium rich environment.  The pitting that can occur from the sodium ingression can limit the design life at the design torque due to stress corrosion cracking.  


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

michael winand
 

Hi Mike,  mine sheared when I was unfurling the sail.  Still confused about how this was possible.  I replaced the gearbox and motor with the Bongifoly.  See if it works for as long. 
Amel used these on the earlier versions of the SM 
Michael  Nebo  sm251 


On Tue, 4 May 2021 at 7:57 pm, Mike Ondra via groups.io
<mdondra@...> wrote:
Eric,
We had both the outhaul and furling motor for the main shear several years ago.
Mike


On May 3, 2021, at 11:01 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



Hi Mike,

What furling motor is this? Main or Genoa?

Fair Winds

Eric

sm

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Mike Ondra via groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 03, 2021 9:11 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

 

Picking up on a thread from last year re shearing of the motor shafts on the furling motors between the motor and gear box.  Happened to SV Delos as shown in Episode 317 around the 10 min. mark. Others have experienced this, all at the same place (Nebo sm251, Aletes SM 240 twice, and I believe Delos is in the 250’s or 260’s). Curious if others have experienced this and if anyone has an explanation. This is a fairly stout shaft and it would seem the motor should stall before shearing if the shaft was healthy (no fatigued). There is no shaft exposure to weather.

 

Mike Ondra

Aleses SM#240

Chesapeake Bay, USA


Re: maramu and santorin owners - what size dinghy do you have an where do you store

Alejandro Paquin
 

Good morning,
We have a 9 foot Caribe dinghy with fiberglass single bottom. Stored on top of the aft cabin while underway and towed in calm waters. While at the marina it sits also on top of the aft cabin, but some other Maramu owners I´ve seen use a spinnaker halyard to raise the dinghy from the bow and keep it forward of the main mast (semi hanging), resting on its stern. We have a 15 hp Yamaha 2 stroke engine with this dinghy, place on the rail while sailing. I once used a 12 foot dinghy one time, and that went on the deck forward of the main mast. It is an awkward location not very good for visibility. No davits on our boat.
--
Alex Paquin
S/V " SIMPATICO"
Amel Maramu
Hull #94, 1981


Re: maramu and santorin owners - what size dinghy do you have an where do you store

Herbert Lackner
 

Hi Eric,

we use a 3D Tender 270 Hypalon Ultra Light (39kg). It fits perfect on the aft cabin top fully inflated, and we are very happy with the decision.  During passages the dinghi on the aft cabine makes the cockpit even more "cosy" and gives extra protection.
We use a light 9,8 Tohatsu 2-stroke engine (25kg), very fast and also good with some waves.

https://www.nootica.de/schlauchboot-3d-tender-ultra-light-rib-hypalon-270.html

herbert

SN120

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