Date   

Re: A question to the hive mind re Amel 54 (Sleipner side power) Bow thruster capacitor please.

Porter McRoberts
 

Thank you all. I really appreciate all the thoughts. 

Sleipner still sleeping. IMTRA seems willing to help. They had some questions which prohibited a final answer today. 
Regardless. The thruster thrusts well, sounds good without it. We turned around in the marina just fine. 
I’ll limit use without the widget and update when I get final answers

Thanks again and have a wonderful weekend!

Porter

Porter McRoberts 
S/V IBIS A54-152
WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206
Www.fouribis.net

On Aug 21, 2020, at 10:23 AM, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Actually the capacitor may also help in reducing the sparking of the brushes and reduce the wear and tear on those things. So definitely recommend to replace. I can't tell you the value though as our Amel  is too far away to see.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Ladder

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi James, herewith two photos of the stern mounted ladder on the boat along side me in New Caledonia, Nov. It was in two hinged parts, one took it to the bumper, the next folded down into the water. Looked good.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 22 August 2020 at 03:04 "james Hosford via groups.io" <jay.hosford@...> wrote:

Ah thanks pictures I saw I thought it was fiberglass or fiberglass encapsulated wood.   Oh well it was an idea

 

On Aug 21, 2020, at 9:07 AM, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

James,

Assuming you have the OEM Amel bumper, the bumper would likely just rip off the back of the boat if you tried that.  It's made from some sort of foam rubber and held in place by just two M8 bolts with some fender washers. The bolts are meant to hold up the weight of the bumper and keep it in place in a compression load (bumping into a dock, etc.).  They are not meant to hold the weight of a ladder and person pulling down on the bumper.


--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


 


 


Re: A question to the hive mind re Amel 54 (Sleipner side power) Bow thruster capacitor please.

Dean Gillies
 

Porter,
There is also a possibility that the component is not a capacitor. It could be a varistor. If so, it may be a little more difficult to source.
Hopefully Sleipner will wake up soon!
Cheers
Dean

Sent from my iPhone X


Re: Onan shuts down under load without shutdown codes

 

Mark,

I think I should have suggested that because the exhaust elbow was at the correct temperature, but the engine overheating. 

I think if I added the following  to the top of the check list you would have found it earlier:

"Remove the exhaust elbow and inspect the junction of the elbow with the manifold. If you see carbon buildup, remove the manifold and clean or replace both the manifold and the elbow."

Agree?

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Fri, Aug 21, 2020, 5:19 PM Thomas Peacock <peacock8491@...> wrote:
Hi Mark,

I was actually going to suggest that you look at the exhaust manifold, but didn’t want to look dumb. However, our problem wasn’t that it would shut down, but that it would not start. Many $$$ later, a good mechanic looked there and found the culprit.

In addition, I would have thought that the exhaust temperature would have risen and tripped the generator; but not all Onans are the same, I don’t think we have an exhaust temperature monitor, just a water temp.

I should add that the exhaust manifold carbon buildup is a common problem; it results from the generator being run at relatively low power demand levels, never at high enough fuel consumption (the RPM are constant) to burn out the carbon.

Everyone who has an Onan should be aware of this, and keep an eye on the build-up.  Ours was so far gone that we had to replace the manifold, cleaning was not an option.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay

On Aug 21, 2020, at 5:48 PM, Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...> wrote:

 After replacing the thermostat, water sensor, fan belt, coolant, and raw water pump, it turns out the problem was carbon buildup in the exhaust manifold.  That’s been cleaned out and a new exhaust elbow added and all seems good now.  Thanks to all for their suggestions.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III,SM#419
Nantucket


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: Ladder

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi gang,

If I remember correctly, Quelzal has a very nice installation...

A platform was added on the port side of the stern with a deployable telescopic ladder.  The deployable portion rests on the back bumper to prevent the ladder moving under the stern whe loaded with a humanoid...

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ 


On 22 Aug 2020, at 07:30, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:



Last year when I was in New Caledonia Marina I was alongside an SM that had fitted a very good fold down ladder to the stern, (not attached to the bumper) I will try and find my photos of it.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 22 August 2020 at 03:04 "james Hosford via groups.io" <jay.hosford@...> wrote:

Ah thanks pictures I saw I thought it was fiberglass or fiberglass encapsulated wood.   Oh well it was an idea

 

On Aug 21, 2020, at 9:07 AM, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

James,

Assuming you have the OEM Amel bumper, the bumper would likely just rip off the back of the boat if you tried that.  It's made from some sort of foam rubber and held in place by just two M8 bolts with some fender washers. The bolts are meant to hold up the weight of the bumper and keep it in place in a compression load (bumping into a dock, etc.).  They are not meant to hold the weight of a ladder and person pulling down on the bumper.


--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


 


 


Re: A question to the hive mind re Amel 54 (Sleipner side power) Bow thruster capacitor please.

Dean Gillies
 

Hi Porter,
Is (was) there only one capacitor in the system? Seems like a 4-brush motor might have at least one more. If so, maybe you can carefully lift one leg off and measure it?

I would surmise that it is non-essential, but I would not suggest operating the thruster without it, just in case. I'm sure Sleipner will advise the correct capacity soon enough.

Tahiti ! Lucky you 😀

Cheers
Dean
SY Stella
A54-154




Sent from my iPhone X


Re: Onan shuts down under load without shutdown codes

Thomas Peacock
 

Hi Mark,

I was actually going to suggest that you look at the exhaust manifold, but didn’t want to look dumb. However, our problem wasn’t that it would shut down, but that it would not start. Many $$$ later, a good mechanic looked there and found the culprit.

In addition, I would have thought that the exhaust temperature would have risen and tripped the generator; but not all Onans are the same, I don’t think we have an exhaust temperature monitor, just a water temp.

I should add that the exhaust manifold carbon buildup is a common problem; it results from the generator being run at relatively low power demand levels, never at high enough fuel consumption (the RPM are constant) to burn out the carbon.

Everyone who has an Onan should be aware of this, and keep an eye on the build-up.  Ours was so far gone that we had to replace the manifold, cleaning was not an option.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay

On Aug 21, 2020, at 5:48 PM, Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...> wrote:

 After replacing the thermostat, water sensor, fan belt, coolant, and raw water pump, it turns out the problem was carbon buildup in the exhaust manifold.  That’s been cleaned out and a new exhaust elbow added and all seems good now.  Thanks to all for their suggestions.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III,SM#419
Nantucket


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: Onan shuts down under load without shutdown codes

Mark Pitt
 

 After replacing the thermostat, water sensor, fan belt, coolant, and raw water pump, it turns out the problem was carbon buildup in the exhaust manifold.  That’s been cleaned out and a new exhaust elbow added and all seems good now.  Thanks to all for their suggestions.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III,SM#419
Nantucket


Re: Water hoses in engine room

Vic Fryzel
 

Thanks James & Craig. All great advice that I'm gonna use for this project.

For folks in San Diego, I found San Diego Marine Exchange who is a Scandvik "dealer." They sell the ABA clamps for what seems like a pretty reasonable price if you buy a 10-pack. I'm still sorting out which sizes I'll need. Scandvik sells a cruiser pack for a few hundred bucks that seems to have a variety, but not sure how useful that is.

Thanks!
- Vic


On Thu, Aug 20, 2020 at 12:12 PM Craig & Katherine Briggs via groups.io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Vic,
You note you've got a West Marine (WM) nearby and Kevin said he used Defenders. I just did a bunch of replacements - WM was $7.29 for the Scandvik ABA 316 SS SAE10. A local FL store (Boat Owners Warehouse) has it for 3.92 and Defender is $2.99. Buying many clamps makes Defender's shipping charge minor. Scandvik ABA is excellent. WM has Scandvik add a digit to the clamp number so they can call it a private brand and refuse to price match, saying it is not identical - it is.

Double clamping has been highly recommended for thru-hulls (with long barbs). Not important for fresh water, sea water on pump discharges and engine coolant as you likely won't sink if those go.

My project was the hot water tank.  To clean just remove all the hoses and electric feed, then drain and take it out of the engine room. Pull the heating element and plumbing fittings. Then rinse thoroughly, shaking it around and upside down to slosh out any sludge. If you've got rusty sludge, rinse and slosh some more with a bunch of phosphoric acid to passivate. Reassemble with fresh teflon tape on the pipe threads and maybe put in a new heating element - every few years is good for those - and do check the wiring for any electric corrosion.  Don't forget the clamps on the copper distribution pipes along the hull - mine were buried in sound insulation and rusting badly.

Mine is a 16 year old IsoTemp that had a tiny leak at the hot outlet that dripped down and corroded the thermostats. I had patched a side wall leak with JB Weld 15 years ago and that was still good (JB Weld rocks!) but I peeled that off anyway and redid both with a new JB Weld "Marine" version for $8. Replacement generic button thermostats = $3. Replacement heating element $12. Total repair $23 vs new IsoTemp at about $700.  I did put it on the "repair-again" list for 2035. 

Craig - SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: A question to the hive mind re Amel 54 (Sleipner side power) Bow thruster capacitor please.

Arno Luijten
 

Actually the capacitor may also help in reducing the sparking of the brushes and reduce the wear and tear on those things. So definitely recommend to replace. I can't tell you the value though as our Amel  is too far away to see.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price. Final chance to order

eric freedman
 

Sorry,

After the storm 2 weeks ago we were without internet for quite a while.
I will be ordering these switches this coming week.
Please confirm your order. I will pay for them and you can send me a check
when you receive them.
please reply to kimberlite@...



Please send me a note confirming your order and make a shipping label that I
can cut out of the email to attach to the package

such as:



Eric
Freedman
345 New York Ave.
Huntington, NY 11743



I have broken a few of these switches over the years. I have done this by
reaching over the generator to retrieve something stored behind the genset.

I received a quote from my Onan dealer and on Amazon for around $90- plus
tax which is ridiculous.

These are normally closed switches. They can also make the normally open
switches if I get enough orders.

I tracked down the OEM manufacturer and the cost is about $23- plus a one
time set up fee of about $50- I plan on ordering 2 of these. They stated
that they make this for ONAN. If anyone is interested please let me know and
I can order them for you $33- each plus USPS of about $8.00.

I will order the switches within a week.

Fair Winds,

Eric

SM 376 Kimberlite


Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price. Final chance to order

eric freedman
 

Sorry,

After the storm 2 weeks ago we were without internet for quite a while.
I will be ordering these switches this coming week.
Please confirm your order. I will pay for them and you can send me a check when you receive them

 

Please send me a note confirming your order and make a shipping label that I can cut out of the email to attach to the package

such as:

 

                                                                    Eric Freedman
                                                345 New York Ave.
                                                Huntington, NY 11743

 

I have broken a few of these switches over the years. I have done this by reaching over the generator to retrieve something stored behind the genset.

I received a quote from my Onan dealer and on Amazon for around $90- plus tax which is ridiculous.

These are normally closed switches. They can also make the normally open switches if I get enough orders.

I tracked down the OEM manufacturer and the cost is about $23- plus a one time set up fee of about $50- I plan on ordering 2 of these. They stated that they make this for ONAN. If anyone is interested please let me know and I can order them for you $33- each plus USPS of about $8.00.

I will order the switches within a week.

Fair Winds,

Eric

SM 376 Kimberlite 

 


Re: Ladder

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Last year when I was in New Caledonia Marina I was alongside an SM that had fitted a very good fold down ladder to the stern, (not attached to the bumper) I will try and find my photos of it.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 22 August 2020 at 03:04 "james Hosford via groups.io" <jay.hosford@...> wrote:

Ah thanks pictures I saw I thought it was fiberglass or fiberglass encapsulated wood.   Oh well it was an idea

 

On Aug 21, 2020, at 9:07 AM, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

James,

Assuming you have the OEM Amel bumper, the bumper would likely just rip off the back of the boat if you tried that.  It's made from some sort of foam rubber and held in place by just two M8 bolts with some fender washers. The bolts are meant to hold up the weight of the bumper and keep it in place in a compression load (bumping into a dock, etc.).  They are not meant to hold the weight of a ladder and person pulling down on the bumper.


--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


 


 


Re: A question to the hive mind re Amel 54 (Sleipner side power) Bow thruster capacitor please.

Scott SV Tengah
 

Try Brad at Imtra, the distributor in the US. They've been pretty helpful and responsive.

Norwegians (Sleipner) may still be on summer holiday. :)

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Wifi extenders and the bonding system

Scott SV Tengah
 

Arno, 

I got it to work only with the help of my friend. I literally couldn't connect to the Mikrotik Wap AC to even try to set it up for a year! Having a Mac doesn't help. I believe your Badboy is the same as my old Wirie Pro - a Bullet with a custom firmware, which you access through a webpage. Same with the Mikrotik, but it's just far more complicated. 

To be clear, I've never used a Mikrotik for the WAN portion of my network. In other words, it was always for the internal wifi network. For that it's been great. My internal network is fast enough that I have one hard drive shared between multiple computers over wifi and data transfer is almost as fast as connecting the hard drive by cable directly.  

For connecting to remote access points (cafe/restaurant/marina/etc), I first used the Bullet/Wirie, which is exactly what you have. Then I used the Alfa Tube, which had a much lower noise floor. For whatever reason, I had a big problem with noise floor on the Bullet. As you probably know, it's not just signal strength, but it's signal strength relative to the noise floor, which determines how fast/responsive your internet will be.

Moreover, the results you receive are dependent on another multitude of factors, so just isolating receiver sensitivity and transmission power to compare different setups, if all else is not equal, is not very useful. If the airwaves are congested where you are, the strongest received signal, defined by signal-to-noise ratio, won't help you too much. The nature of 2.4ghz transmissions is that many of the channels OVERLAP and some routers double their radio bandwidth to 40mhz in an effort to increase throughput, but that results in a higher likelihood of overlapping. So if you have someone else on an overlapping channel, you will have slowdowns. Further, the remote access point's connection to the internet is another factor. You can have the strongest, best receiver in the world but if your marina/cafe's access point has a dial up connection, the best speed you will ever get is dial up.

Finally, be careful cranking up transmission power. First off, it only helps with uploading. Secondly, Badboy's claimed 36db must include the gain from the antenna. Otherwise, they're violating max power limits from the FCC and I believe they're based in the US. Thirdly, my networking engineer friend explained to me that many wifi routers are smart. If your boat is sending a very powerful signal out, the receiving router interprets that as you being something like a smartphone that is very close to that router. To save power for both the router and the "smartphone client", the router will then lower its own output power. Through experimenting, I find that if I encounter one of those smart routers, turning DOWN my transmission power will increase my internet speed. Finally, high transmission power will increase the likelihood for interference for other users - bad karma and also another reason why smart routers, in an attempt to be good citizens, will decrease their output power in response to a high power received signal.

This wifi stuff is almost as complicated as maintaining a boat! Almost.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: A question to the hive mind re Amel 54 (Sleipner side power) Bow thruster capacitor please.

Ryan Meador
 

Hi Porter,

The capacitor should be labeled.  On one side of the disc, I expect you'll see some tiny numbers.  If you can write them down and/or get a clear photo, that would help a lot for identifying it.  Failing that, you'll have to measure it with a meter (looks impossible due to the damage) or get the specifications from the manufacturer.

I concur with the tech -- it is a ceramic capacitor, most likely to reduce electrical/radio interference.  I'd prefer not to speculate on whether it's safe to operate the thruster without it.

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Fri, Aug 21, 2020 at 1:02 PM Porter McRoberts via groups.io <portermcroberts=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Yesterday while cleaning contactor and brushes and then reassembling the bow thruster, accidentally we tore this small wire and capacitor vs resistor which connected between the brushes Set “A” and Set “B” of the four sets A-D. It appears to be a capacitor of some kind, theorized by the guy in the electronics shop to offer some sort of harmonic filtering and reduction of radio interference, and thus non-essential to the function of the BT.   It is a Sleipner “side power” bow thruster. No response yet from Sleipner.

The electronics guy has a host of small capacitors, and it would be easy to wire one up, but which size?  Might anyone 1) know the size?, 2) be able to confirm the non-essential nature of this small device? 3) have any suggestions in the absence of intel from Sleipner?

Thank you very much!

Porter McRoberts
A54-152. Tahiti.




A question to the hive mind re Amel 54 (Sleipner side power) Bow thruster capacitor please.

Porter McRoberts
 

Yesterday while cleaning contactor and brushes and then reassembling the bow thruster, accidentally we tore this small wire and capacitor vs resistor which connected between the brushes Set “A” and Set “B” of the four sets A-D. It appears to be a capacitor of some kind, theorized by the guy in the electronics shop to offer some sort of harmonic filtering and reduction of radio interference, and thus non-essential to the function of the BT. It is a Sleipner “side power” bow thruster. No response yet from Sleipner.

The electronics guy has a host of small capacitors, and it would be easy to wire one up, but which size? Might anyone 1) know the size?, 2) be able to confirm the non-essential nature of this small device? 3) have any suggestions in the absence of intel from Sleipner?

Thank you very much!

Porter McRoberts
A54-152. Tahiti.


Re: Furling main on Amel 60

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Bill,

Not surprised about the change to ProFurl. Reckmann may be good stuff but the price is eye-watering.
If you look closely at the mainsail you will notice an block in the mainsail and a line going to the end of the boom. That seems the way most Selden masts are setup, but they use a winch for the outhaul.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Furling main on Amel 60

 

Arno,

I did not notice that but did notice the use of electric ProFurl furlers rather than Reckmann furlers on the genoa and staysail.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Fri, Aug 21, 2020 at 9:42 AM Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:
Dear forum,

Did anyone have a close look at the furling system on the new Amel 60 for the main sail. From what I can see they changed the way this works but the pictures are not very detailed. More specifically the way the outhaul works seems to have changed as the motor seems to have disappeared from the boom.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Ladder

james Hosford
 

Ah thanks pictures I saw I thought it was fiberglass or fiberglass encapsulated wood.   Oh well it was an idea


On Aug 21, 2020, at 9:07 AM, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:



James,

Assuming you have the OEM Amel bumper, the bumper would likely just rip off the back of the boat if you tried that.  It's made from some sort of foam rubber and held in place by just two M8 bolts with some fender washers. The bolts are meant to hold up the weight of the bumper and keep it in place in a compression load (bumping into a dock, etc.).  They are not meant to hold the weight of a ladder and person pulling down on the bumper.


--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA