Date   
Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117) [1 Attachment]

hanspeter baettig
 

hello Bode
your zink anode on the propeller looks good
but whats about the bubbels on your keel/ ballst
looks not good
Hanspeter
Tamango 2
SM16

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 13.06.2018 um 06:39 schrieb steve@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

This is the zinc that was on there. Anyone know what the replacement is?

-Bode

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

karkauai
 

The prop zinc for a MaxProp has very narrow bridges of zinc around the bolts.  When they go the rest of the zinc will fall off. I paint those bridges with an enamel paint and they last five times as long. The original zincs on my rudder were 5 inches in diameter, I am now using 7 inch diameter zincs from Camp.  My hull potential is better, and they last much longer.

A diver turned me onto Camp zincs when I had the problem with electrolysis of my prop shaft. You may have noticed that the Martyr zincs from West Marine erode unevenly, with big pits in some places and little eroded in others. Apparently this is due to inadequate mixing of the alloy. Camp sinks erode much more evenly.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM243

On Jun 13, 2018, at 2:17 AM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi ASteve,


Looks like you have a 3 blade maxprop...

This link should help you decide what you think you need...and you can probably get it cheaper from somewhere else.



I'm confused by what you mean by the "plate" zinc....are you talking about the rectangular plate on the side of the rudder?..if so that's not a zinc, its the ground plate for the SSB radio.

If your rudder zincs are fine, but the prop zinc isn't you may have a bonding issue...the rudder zincs should be decaying....in fact you shouldn't need the prop zinc if your bonding system is all good.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 Musket Cove, Fiji

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

Craig & Katherine Briggs
 


James,
If some bolts won't come out and have never been removed before it seems likely there has not been water ingress - they're just being uncooperative and can wait for you to get back to your shop for better tools. If you're concerned, I'd treat them with Captain Tolley's (Amazing) Creeping Crack Cure - great product.

I had the embedded plate of the port side aft-most stanchion get wet after the original GPS antenna cable was removed along with the silicon Amel had sealed it with. After many years the rusting plate swelled up and cracked the toe rail open. A few years ago I cut out the old plate, replaced it and re-glassed the toe rail, which now looks like new. This can also be an issue if you rewire the bow lights.

Others have reported swelling in the SM engine-room hatch cover supports (I think BebeBill was the first to post about it). Don't recall any issues reported about the genoa track rail bolts, which I believe you're working on.

Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Craig,

   Thanks for the advice and information on how you dealt with the bolts on your boat that are tapped into the embedded plates, that was very helpful to me! 

   I will definitely take Joel’s advice on sealing and using new bolts.  I have read about the problems that can occur if water gets to the backing plates and I certainly want to avoid that if at all possible.  My thoughts are to remove any of the rail bolts that I can get out easily and replace/reseal those as soon as I can.    The remainder that are  difficult to remove will have to wait until I get Sueño back to my shop in Florida.  I am wondering if there are any options to help prevent water ingress on the fasteners that I cannot easily remove?

   Best of luck to you and your project.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220


    

On Jun 12, 2018, at 8:51 PM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

My experience was some bolts were easily removed, others really stubborn. After trying BIG screwdriver with square shaft and a wrench on that to add to torque, the ultimate solution for the ones that got "buggered" was to weld a short hex head bolt onto the flat slotted head of the stanchion bolt and put a socket wrench on that - easy peasy removal.

Do take Joel's advice to heart to be SURE you seal the new/replaced bolts totally. This forum has many reports of the embedded carbon steel backing plates corroding and some bursting open - believe me, it's a BIG fiberglass repair job to cut out the old plates and rebuild the fiberglass and gel coat.
Good luck with it!
Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Gary,

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hi Bill


I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 160 - AC Motor for High Pressure Pump

Heinz Stutenbaeumer
 

Hello 
The engine of my water maker Desselator Duo 160 l is defective. 
I wrote to the manufacturer and they really want 1350,00 Euro + 750,00 Euro for the transport to Pannama. 
I think that's an outrage. 
Can someone tell me what I need for an engine, so I can get a similar one. Unfortunately, no type designation can be recognized on my motor. 
Thanks in advance 

Fair winds 

Heinz Stutenbāumer
Quetzal, SM2000,292



Am 06.06.2018 um 07:33 schrieb pstas2003 <no_reply@...>:

 

Heinz,

Thank you very much for sharing that information.  It is most helpful,

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
Fort Louis Marina - Saint Martin

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

James Alton
 

Craig,

   Thanks for the advice and information on how you dealt with the bolts on your boat that are tapped into the embedded plates, that was very helpful to me! 

   I will definitely take Joel’s advice on sealing and using new bolts.  I have read about the problems that can occur if water gets to the backing plates and I certainly want to avoid that if at all possible.  My thoughts are to remove any of the rail bolts that I can get out easily and replace/reseal those as soon as I can.    The remainder that are  difficult to remove will have to wait until I get Sueño back to my shop in Florida.  I am wondering if there are any options to help prevent water ingress on the fasteners that I cannot easily remove?

   Best of luck to you and your project.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220


    

On Jun 12, 2018, at 8:51 PM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

My experience was some bolts were easily removed, others really stubborn. After trying BIG screwdriver with square shaft and a wrench on that to add to torque, the ultimate solution for the ones that got "buggered" was to weld a short hex head bolt onto the flat slotted head of the stanchion bolt and put a socket wrench on that - easy peasy removal.

Do take Joel's advice to heart to be SURE you seal the new/replaced bolts totally. This forum has many reports of the embedded carbon steel backing plates corroding and some bursting open - believe me, it's a BIG fiberglass repair job to cut out the old plates and rebuild the fiberglass and gel coat.
Good luck with it!
Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris.


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Gary,

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hi Bill


I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.






Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

Alan Leslie
 

Hi ASteve,

Looks like you have a 3 blade maxprop...

This link should help you decide what you think you need...and you can probably get it cheaper from somewhere else.



I'm confused by what you mean by the "plate" zinc....are you talking about the rectangular plate on the side of the rudder?..if so that's not a zinc, its the ground plate for the SSB radio.

If your rudder zincs are fine, but the prop zinc isn't you may have a bonding issue...the rudder zincs should be decaying....in fact you shouldn't need the prop zinc if your bonding system is all good.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 Musket Cove, Fiji

Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117
 

This is the zinc that was on there. Anyone know what the replacement is?
-Bode

Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117
 

Who knows the specs of the zincs for the 1994 SM? Intention has no prop or plate zinc left. Curiously, the rudder zinc looks fine. I'm leaving to go to sea for two days and need to procure these in Palermo, Italy and don't know where to look up which ones to buy. Happy to hire a diver to install them, but need the zincs in hand I believe.
Steve Bode
Sailing Vessel Intention
Amel Super Maramu 1994 #117
Facebook.com/svIntention
+1 415-710-6659

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

Craig & Katherine Briggs
 

My experience was some bolts were easily removed, others really stubborn. After trying BIG screwdriver with square shaft and a wrench on that to add to torque, the ultimate solution for the ones that got "buggered" was to weld a short hex head bolt onto the flat slotted head of the stanchion bolt and put a socket wrench on that - easy peasy removal.
Do take Joel's advice to heart to be SURE you seal the new/replaced bolts totally. This forum has many reports of the embedded carbon steel backing plates corroding and some bursting open - believe me, it's a BIG fiberglass repair job to cut out the old plates and rebuild the fiberglass and gel coat.
Good luck with it!
Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Gary,

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hi Bill


I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

Mike Ondra
 

 

Trying again

From: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 5:39 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal [1 Attachment]

 

 

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

Attached is a sketch that came with Aletes showing the toe rail cross section and bolt-backplate configuration.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

From: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 8:38 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

 

 

Gary,

 

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

 

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

 

James Alton

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Hi Bill

 

I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

 

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

 

Sincerely, 

 

Gary S. Silver

s/v Liahona

Amel SM 2000 #335

currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

 

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.

 

 

 

 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

Mike Ondra
 

Attached is a sketch that came with Aletes showing the toe rail cross section and bolt-backplate configuration.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

From: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 8:38 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

 

 

Gary,

 

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

 

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

 

James Alton

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Hi Bill

 

I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

 

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

 

Sincerely, 

 

Gary S. Silver

s/v Liahona

Amel SM 2000 #335

currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

 

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.

 

 

 

 

Re: FW: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

pacificcool@...
 

Thanks much for the info!  
Bill Shaproski

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

James Alton
 

Gary,

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hi Bill


I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.




Re: FW: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Bill

I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches short of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fiberglass and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.


FW: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

amelforme
 

 

 

From: Joel Potter [mailto:jfpottercys@...]
Sent: Monday, June 11, 2018 11:39 AM
To: 'amelyachtowners@...'
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

 

Hi Bill. The stanchions fasteners are threaded into a mild steel  flat  bar  stock that is laminated into the fiberglass on the inside of the bulwark. The receiver bar stock has been properly tapped and threaded to secure the fasteners. When you refasten it, be sure not to spare the Ultra Tef-Gel anti-seize. You may need an impact screwdriver to get the fasteners loose if they have not been removed and new anti-seize installed in the last 10 years or so.

 

All The Best, Joel

 

Joel F. Potter-Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, June 11, 2018 10:02 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

 

 

I have a 1995 Super Maramu and I need to remove one of the stanchions near the back of the boat. The stanchion has a bracket welded to the bottom which attaches to the deck by a horizontal and a vertical bolt.  I cannot reach underside of the bolts to determine if there is a nut or they are screwed into some kind of heli-coil.  If it's a heli-coil I can theoretically remove the bolts and then reinstall them assuming the heli-coil is still in place.  Does anyone know how these bolts are attached and/or has anyone removed them to remove a stanchion.  I need to remove it to weld a crack in the base. 

 

Bill Shaproski

S/V Pacific Cool

Currently in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

 

Colin,

Very Well Done.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970






On Sun, Jun 10, 2018 at 11:28 AM Sailing Island Pearl colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

We just did the Chagos to Rodrigues leg of South Indian Ocean passage, with 5 of 9 days in sustained 35 kts with lots of 40+kts and the wind speed pegged on max over 50kts on occasions.

The seas started at 3.5m swells but were well over 5m for two days and a very angry and unpredictable 6m or more at the peak for approx 24 hrs.

I can report rhat the SM handled this with ease. We had fortunately anticipated this, and hence made our southing from Chagos early in 25-30kts (ie upwind sailing), so by the time we hit the strong 35+ winds and big seas, we could bear off to a point where the wind was just behind the beam, making things far easier running down waves which would be near impossible to go upwind and over without launching into mid air and slamming down.

Whilst it was wild and sometimes white out conditions, never did we feel unsafe, and with mostly just a very small amount of all 3 sails out, the boat stayed in control at all times, and mainly under 7kts speed without any need for a drougue.

Hope we have no more 50+ kts on the balance of our Indian Ocean crossing, but it sure is nice to know and experience the amazing capability of these Amels when one is thousands of miles from anywhere.

Colin Streeter
SV Island Pearl II
SM #332, Rodrigues



On Wed, 6 Jun. 2018, 17:28 greatketch@... [amelyachtowners], <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hans-Peter,


The mizzen boom on my boat most certainly can hit the twin backstays. I just went on deck to confirm.

The Main boon can hit the main mast back stay, but only IF the permanent fixed vang was not installed.

Hope that makes it clear..

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA

Re: Climma Compact 9EH - Sea water pump specs.

Philippe Morel
 

First of all , after long storage without usine the calpeda d’eau water puma ,it is mentionned that you mustang use à screw driver and move the axe on the bottom side of the poser motor . In fact ,the turning gasket is dry and m’est be free to let the motor run . As said ,calpeda could be rebuilt , but , on our Belavita , we replace by the March pump ,with magnetic drive , strong decrease of noise , no maintenance and good relia îlots .

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

islandpearl2_sm2k332
 

Wise decision Pat.

For our Caribbean cruising in 2019, and for our Pacific crossing afterwards, we cannot see ourselves forking out the extra cash for currents as it is far less important, and more benign so probably never a life or death decision.

I forgot to mention earlier that wave / swell heights and directiins right across the Indian Ocean so far have been absolutely spot on for P. Wind. When they said 3-4 meters that was precisely what we were in, and where it predicted 5-6m we got exactly that. Really impressive and we re-run our weather forecasts normally 2 to 3 times per 24hrs when on an ocean crossing. Why not ...it is free on the unlimited package and .... something intetesting to do out there when alone.... and means we can keep putting the boat is the best currents which were all amazingly accurate.

Wr have HF and oactor modem but are now real advocates of the IridiumGo and PW.

Colin
SV IslandPearl II
Amel SM #333
Rodrigues






Sent from my SAMSUNG Galaxy S6 on the Telstra Mobile Network

-------- Original message --------
From: "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 11/6/18 19:19 (GMT+04:00)
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

 

Colin, Thanks for the reply, always interesting to know what one's experience is with a product ,sounds positive . I would not get the professional version probably, but makes sense for you ,and where you are going. Currents have a greater impact on conditions in that part of the world. 

Thanks Again,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Sailing Island Pearl colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Mon, Jun 11, 2018 9:13 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

 
Hi Pat

Yes, we use P.Wind professional package with currents etc via an Iridium Go unlimited package. Bit pricey but well worth the money for our Indian Ocean crossing (and Sth Atlantic next too) as currents have been awesome.

Winds are good but were over estimated for most of our north Indian Ocean crossing (Thail -Maldives) and then under estimated by 5-10 kts for our Sth Indian Ocean crossing so far which everyone warned us about.

Currents have been exceptional and will be even more important soon as we intend to go back up around tge top of Madagascar after Mauritius and Reunion then down the notorious Mozambique channel with all its currents often hard to find.

PW gives 4 different weathet models and we always average tgem out and look for where they agree. With all this info you really do have a fair amount of control which we like.

I should also add we are also using a well known local Sth African weather routing expert ( Des Carlson) so tend to take all that info but always make our own decisions in the end and hence occasionally get it wrong such as this trip whete PW route would have been more direct and missed the worst of the weather we hit.... but that is life. You take a decision... win some...lose some etc.

Colin
SV Island Pearl II
Amel SM#332
Rodrigues


 

On Mon, 11 Jun. 2018, 02:36 Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners], <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Colin, Sounds like a boisterous passage, I am sure exciting ,yet good to be done with , well done.What forecasting service do you use , is it not Predict Wind ? If so did you find it accurate , worthwhile.
Fair Winds ,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Sailing Island Pearl colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Sun, Jun 10, 2018 12:27 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

 
We just did the Chagos to Rodrigues leg of South Indian Ocean passage, with 5 of 9 days in sustained 35 kts with lots of 40+kts and the wind speed pegged on max over 50kts on occasions.

The seas started at 3.5m swells but were well over 5m for two days and a very angry and unpredictable 6m or more at the peak for approx 24 hrs.

I can report rhat the SM handled this with ease. We had fortunately anticipated this, and hence made our southing from Chagos early in 25-30kts (ie upwind sailing), so by the time we hit the strong 35+ winds and big seas, we could bear off to a point where the wind was just behind the beam, making things far easier running down waves which would be near impossible to go upwind and over without launching into mid air and slamming down.

Whilst it was wild and sometimes white out conditions, never did we feel unsafe, and with mostly just a very small amount of all 3 sails out, the boat stayed in control at all times, and mainly under 7kts speed without any need for a drougue.

Hope we have no more 50+ kts on the balance of our Indian Ocean crossing, but it sure is nice to know and experience the amazing capability of these Amels when one is thousands of miles from anywhere.

Colin Streeter
SV Island Pearl II
SM #332, Rodrigues



On Wed, 6 Jun. 2018, 17:28 greatketch@... [amelyachtowners], <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Hans-Peter,

The mizzen boom on my boat most certainly can hit the twin backstays. I just went on deck to confirm.

The Main boon can hit the main mast back stay, but only IF the permanent fixed vang was not installed.

Hope that makes it clear..

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

amelforme
 

Hi Bill. The stanchions fasteners are threaded into a mild steel  flat  bar  stock that is laminated into the fiberglass on the inside of the bulwark. The receiver bar stock has been properly tapped and threaded to secure the fasteners. When you refasten it, be sure not to spare the Ultra Tef-Gel anti-seize. You may need an impact screwdriver to get the fasteners loose if they have not been removed and new anti-seize installed in the last 10 years or so.

 

All The Best, Joel

 

Joel F. Potter-Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, June 11, 2018 10:02 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

 

 

I have a 1995 Super Maramu and I need to remove one of the stanchions near the back of the boat. The stanchion has a bracket welded to the bottom which attaches to the deck by a horizontal and a vertical bolt.  I cannot reach underside of the bolts to determine if there is a nut or they are screwed into some kind of heli-coil.  If it's a heli-coil I can theoretically remove the bolts and then reinstall them assuming the heli-coil is still in place.  Does anyone know how these bolts are attached and/or has anyone removed them to remove a stanchion.  I need to remove it to weld a crack in the base. 

 

Bill Shaproski

S/V Pacific Cool

Currently in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Patrick McAneny
 

Colin, Thanks for the reply, always interesting to know what one's experience is with a product ,sounds positive . I would not get the professional version probably, but makes sense for you ,and where you are going. Currents have a greater impact on conditions in that part of the world. 
Thanks Again,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Sailing Island Pearl colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Mon, Jun 11, 2018 9:13 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

 
Hi Pat

Yes, we use P.Wind professional package with currents etc via an Iridium Go unlimited package. Bit pricey but well worth the money for our Indian Ocean crossing (and Sth Atlantic next too) as currents have been awesome.

Winds are good but were over estimated for most of our north Indian Ocean crossing (Thail -Maldives) and then under estimated by 5-10 kts for our Sth Indian Ocean crossing so far which everyone warned us about.

Currents have been exceptional and will be even more important soon as we intend to go back up around tge top of Madagascar after Mauritius and Reunion then down the notorious Mozambique channel with all its currents often hard to find.

PW gives 4 different weathet models and we always average tgem out and look for where they agree. With all this info you really do have a fair amount of control which we like.

I should also add we are also using a well known local Sth African weather routing expert ( Des Carlson) so tend to take all that info but always make our own decisions in the end and hence occasionally get it wrong such as this trip whete PW route would have been more direct and missed the worst of the weather we hit.... but that is life. You take a decision... win some...lose some etc.

Colin
SV Island Pearl II
Amel SM#332
Rodrigues


 

On Mon, 11 Jun. 2018, 02:36 Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners], <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Colin, Sounds like a boisterous passage, I am sure exciting ,yet good to be done with , well done.What forecasting service do you use , is it not Predict Wind ? If so did you find it accurate , worthwhile.
Fair Winds ,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Sailing Island Pearl colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Sun, Jun 10, 2018 12:27 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

 
We just did the Chagos to Rodrigues leg of South Indian Ocean passage, with 5 of 9 days in sustained 35 kts with lots of 40+kts and the wind speed pegged on max over 50kts on occasions.

The seas started at 3.5m swells but were well over 5m for two days and a very angry and unpredictable 6m or more at the peak for approx 24 hrs.

I can report rhat the SM handled this with ease. We had fortunately anticipated this, and hence made our southing from Chagos early in 25-30kts (ie upwind sailing), so by the time we hit the strong 35+ winds and big seas, we could bear off to a point where the wind was just behind the beam, making things far easier running down waves which would be near impossible to go upwind and over without launching into mid air and slamming down.

Whilst it was wild and sometimes white out conditions, never did we feel unsafe, and with mostly just a very small amount of all 3 sails out, the boat stayed in control at all times, and mainly under 7kts speed without any need for a drougue.

Hope we have no more 50+ kts on the balance of our Indian Ocean crossing, but it sure is nice to know and experience the amazing capability of these Amels when one is thousands of miles from anywhere.

Colin Streeter
SV Island Pearl II
SM #332, Rodrigues



On Wed, 6 Jun. 2018, 17:28 greatketch@... [amelyachtowners], <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Hans-Peter,

The mizzen boom on my boat most certainly can hit the twin backstays. I just went on deck to confirm.

The Main boon can hit the main mast back stay, but only IF the permanent fixed vang was not installed.

Hope that makes it clear..

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA