Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu keel bolts size

Alin SM 283
 

Thank you. I did and got an answer. Regards.


On Wed, 29 Aug 2018 at 20:28, Ann-Sofie Svanberg kanalmamman@... [amelyachtowners]
wrote:
 

Oliver doesn't work at Amel anymore and has probably not access to theire files. 
Contact Maude at sav@... instead.

/Annsofie

Skickat från min iPad

28 aug. 2018 kl. 09:20 skrev Alin Misescu alin1923@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hi.

I sent a separate email to Olivier.  I hoped that there is someone that would know this.
Thank you.
Alin


On Tue, 28 Aug 2018 at 20:08, Ann-Sofie Svanberg kanalmamman@... [amelyachtowners]
 

Have you asked Amel about that? That is the only way, I think, to get an absolute correct answer.

/Annsofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232, 1998

Skickat från min iPad

27 aug. 2018 kl. 21:35 skrev alin1923@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hello everyone. My boat, Wanderer, SM #283 undergoes extensive upgrading and maintenance in NZ. She will be a skippered charter in Bay of Islands. As part of the process , my surveyor wants to check keel bolts. I found an option to ultrasound them, but they were asking for all the keel bolts size and specs of material. Can someone please help me with this? I need to know diameter, length and material specs ( what sort of SS). Thank you. All the best from Alin, Wanderer SM2k#283


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu keel bolts size

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu keel bolts size

Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

Oliver doesn't work at Amel anymore and has probably not access to theire files. 
Contact Maude at sav@... instead.

/Annsofie

Skickat från min iPad

28 aug. 2018 kl. 09:20 skrev Alin Misescu alin1923@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hi.

I sent a separate email to Olivier.  I hoped that there is someone that would know this.
Thank you.
Alin


On Tue, 28 Aug 2018 at 20:08, Ann-Sofie Svanberg kanalmamman@... [amelyachtowners]
 

Have you asked Amel about that? That is the only way, I think, to get an absolute correct answer.

/Annsofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232, 1998

Skickat från min iPad

27 aug. 2018 kl. 21:35 skrev alin1923@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hello everyone. My boat, Wanderer, SM #283 undergoes extensive upgrading and maintenance in NZ. She will be a skippered charter in Bay of Islands. As part of the process , my surveyor wants to check keel bolts. I found an option to ultrasound them, but they were asking for all the keel bolts size and specs of material. Can someone please help me with this? I need to know diameter, length and material specs ( what sort of SS). Thank you. All the best from Alin, Wanderer SM2k#283


Re: SM Pole Lengths

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Bill,

We're parked next to a 1996 Super Maramu and his poles are over the gunwale, he doesn't have a fitting on the stanchion like we do...so our poles (2004) are as you say about 50 cm shorter than his.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
Baie de Ravolieu, Vanuatu


SM Pole Lengths

greatketch@...
 

It seems, based on our observations, that Super Maramu downwind poles came in (at least) two length variants.  


A "short version" where the forward end of the stored pole attaches to a pin on the stanchion at the bow and a "long version" where the forward end of the stored pole extended out past the stanchion, over the side of the boat, and rests on the fiberglass rail.


Our boat (#160) has the "long version" and it is at least 0.5 meter longer in overall length than poles I have noted on newer boats that have the "short version".


Does anyone know it if the longer pole length translates into a genoa with a slightly longer foot length? Or any other rigging dimension differences? Do all boats before #160 have the "longer" poles, or are we somehow unique?


Thanks!


Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD, USA



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

James Studdart
 

That idea of floating an anchor with fenders is gold. Thank you for that.

We were in Suwarrow not too long ago. That day is still spoken of by Harry. Scary indeed.

Cheers,
James
SeaBean SM344
Fiji


On Wed, Aug 29, 2018 at 06:01 Nick Newington ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Possibly the anchor chain caught under a larger coral head right under the bow so that in effect there was 1:1 scope. If it was blowing 40kn across a coupe of miles of fetch then the sea might have been three or four feet. Coming up short like that would put a huge strain on the chain and windlass, as I believe the snubber had already gone. I would have thought that the brake on the windlass would slip before the chain broke. Of course the chain is only as good as the weakest link.

I think the morals of that story are:

1. To always snorkel your anchor in coral waters, and re anchor if need be.
2. Have a second anchor ready to go.
3. Have a really long snubber of nylon that will stretch and can be let out as the wind builds.

This all brings us back to an earlier discussion about tandem anchors. In this instance in Suvorov it would not have helped. Two separate anchors and cables would have saved the boat.

On my first boat I sat out a gale at the Club Med Motu in Bora Bora in 1991, there were quite a few yachts in the anchorage, maybe 10. We had just sailed in from Raiatea and by dusk, having snorkelled the area I decided to lay a second anchor at 45 degrees to the first. The night started with SE 25kn and gradually veered to the South and SW peeking at 60 kn in the gusts. Two yachts were wrecked that night. My boat was only 35 ft. I could row out anchors by hand quite easily.
 With a big Amel anchor of 40kg it is still possible but harder. I have had good results using a couple of fenders slipped through the anchor itself and towing it with a load of chain and rope in the dinghy, then letting slip when the anchor is positioned. Not easy when it gets rough!

Nick ( Amelia)

On 28 Aug 2018, at 17:00, brentcameron61@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I believe that rather than morbid curiosity, the original reason to post this tragedy was because Bill R had asked if anyone had ever heard of an anchor chain breaking.  The listing for Makoko suggests they had 70 m of 12mm chain with a Spade Anchor.  The Kiwi article says that their anchor chain broke in 35-40 knots of wind.   Ian, I did find a subsequent reference on another blog of the same owners as in the article calling the boat Makoko as you had suggested.  I suspect they had just renamed her prior to this.  It's very sad.  


Brent Cameron
Future SM2K Owner



shipwrecked in shelter

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Im not sure how long ago this was, I think I read the story some time ago. It doesn't say why the chain broke but in an anchorage like this with coral sand (terrible holding, perhaps the worst) I would think the chain caught up short on a coral head and with no scope and the boat lunging up and down in a big chop something had to give. If that happens in their situation the only option is to pay out more chain, fast before something does give. So long as a reef is not just behind. We have been in a similar situation but fortunately no breakage. In those tight pacific atoll anchorages  being on anchor in a gale is highly dangerous. If there is warning getting out to sea is the very best option, in fact the only safe option. Comment on the story, the crew completely forgot about the amel watertight bulkheads.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl


Super Maramu Deck Hatch Hold-downs.

greatketch@...
 

In amongst the other projects we have been working on this summer, was what was supposed to be a quick and easy cleanup of some rust bleeding from the screws that hold down the deck hatches.

Like many boat projects this turned out to be a bigger project than just a bit of deck cleaning.  In case anybody else is interested, and needs to add it to their lists:


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Question about the refrigiration system on an A54

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi all,

As promised, my feedback:

I measured 23.5V at the poles for the water pump on the pump controller. Got puzzled again as it’s meant to be for a 12V pump. Talked to Veco who told me i should measure with the pump connected and running. At which point i measured 13.5V.


Best,

Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Curaçao 



On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 at 05:23, Nick ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Apologies you are right. I just measured 13.5v at the circulating pump. Not sure how I got that wrong, anyway. So they need to be 12v pumps for sure.


Nick 

Amelia (54)


On 7 Aug 2018, at 02:28, arno.luijten@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Today I measured the voltage directly across the circulation pump for the fridges and it measures 12.5 Volts when one or more fridges are running/cooling. That makes sense as the pump is 12 Volt.

Frigoboat does tell you to use a voltage divider in case you have a single  compressor setup and a 24 volt system. They even sell a device for this. But when you use the multi-compressor pump switch the divider is apparently build into the switch already.

So I dont' think the original Frigoboat pump can/should be used at 24 Volt. It's likely to burn up very quickly.

Cheers,

Arno


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

James Cromie
 

I did my first SDR from Martinique to Newport this last May.  It was an interesting rally for me because I never once saw another rally goer from start to finish, and only communicated with one other boat by satellite phone who I knew from Martinique.  The benefit of the rally was simply having access to Chris Parker, as well as seeing where the other boats were going on the map.  Otherwise, it was though I was doing it on my own.  I didn’t partake in any of the pre-rally activities because I left from a different port.  

By the way, not to be competitve, but I did like seeing that I was covering more miles per day than most other boats in the rally!  Amels seem to be rather fast for their class.  

James
SV Soteria 
SM 347

On Aug 28, 2018, at 4:58 PM, gary@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I've done 2 Salty Dawg rallies (one each way) and 4 ARC rallies.  

I like the fun of it, the comaraderie , the tiny bit of competition, the weather routing, and the help with check-ins at new destinations. Additionally, there are some genuinely informative and educational seminars that occur prior to the rally itself.

And yes, you ~must~ retain your Captain's hat squarely in place and make your own departure an routing decisions.

With ARC, they've delayed two rallies out of the four we've taken to get better weather.

ARC is much stricter with qualifying crossings and equipment requirements and they cost more being a for-profit business.

I'm looking forward to the ARC to St. Lucia in November. Then we're going with the Salty Dawgs on their Main and Nova Scotia rallies.

I'm looking forward to getting reacquainted with a bunch of people from previous rallies. That, to me, is the real gold of the Rally scene. 

Gary W.
SM 209, Adagio
Malta



shipwrecked in shelter

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Im not sure how long ago this was, I think I read the story some time ago. It doesn't say why the chain broke but in an anchorage like this with coral sand (terrible holding, perhaps the worst) I would think the chain caught up short on a coral head and with no scope and the boat lunging up and down in a big chop something had to give. If that happens in their situation the only option is to pay out more chain, fast before something does give. So long as a reef is not just behind. We have been in a similar situation but fortunately no breakage. In those tight pacific atoll anchorages  being on anchor in a gale is highly dangerous. If there is warning getting out to sea is the very best option, in fact the only safe option. Comment on the story, the crew completely forgot about the amel watertight bulkheads.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Solar panels on the rail

Mark Pitt
 

Paul,

   I have a 125 watt panel on each side.  Did this about 10 years ago.  Panel are attached to the rail with Stauff clamps (http://www.stauff.com/) which allows me to easily rotate them into the sun, or fold them when coming into marina.

   Mark Pitt

  Sabbatical III, SM #419, Lanzarote, Canary Islands

On 8/28/2018 8:31 PM, @Kerpa [amelyachtowners] wrote:
For you who have solar panels on the rail, which size do you have?
Currently we have 450 w on an Emek Arc, and 2x 100 watt on the rail, the 2x 100 are semi flexible works ok, but I can see that they degrade and will not last very long. Plan to install ridged panels on the rail instead. 100 watt readily available, in US next step looks as 160 watt but they looks a bit large size wise. hence the question from you with experience.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259

------------------------------------
Posted by: @Kerpa
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

Gary Wells
 

I've done 2 Salty Dawg rallies (one each way) and 4 ARC rallies.

I like the fun of it, the comaraderie , the tiny bit of competition, the weather routing, and the help with check-ins at new destinations. Additionally, there are some genuinely informative and educational seminars that occur prior to the rally itself.

And yes, you ~must~ retain your Captain's hat squarely in place and make your own departure an routing decisions.

With ARC, they've delayed two rallies out of the four we've taken to get better weather.

ARC is much stricter with qualifying crossings and equipment requirements and they cost more being a for-profit business.

I'm looking forward to the ARC to St. Lucia in November. Then we're going with the Salty Dawgs on their Main and Nova Scotia rallies.

I'm looking forward to getting reacquainted with a bunch of people from previous rallies. That, to me, is the real gold of the Rally scene.

Gary W.
SM 209, Adagio
Malta


Re: Solar panels on the rail

Alan Leslie
 

We have 3 x 200W panels on the Emek Arch.
We don't have panels on the rail.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse Sm437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Deck light / Steaming light SM2000

Alan Leslie
 

Thanks mark..that's the one
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Anchor chain

ya_fohi
 

Many thanks for all the advice. I'm still not quite sure whether or not it needs replacing, or as some one suggested, just re-galvanising. It's not compltely rusty, but there are signs that links have corroded a bit where they join. I guess that if in doubt I'll replace it, then at least it should be good for another 10 years which is what the current one has.

Cheers,
Paul

Ya Fohi, Amel 54 #98


Solar panels on the rail

Paul Osterberg
 

For you who have solar panels on the rail, which size do you have?
Currently we have 450 w on an Emek Arc, and 2x 100 watt on the rail, the 2x 100 are semi flexible works ok, but I can see that they degrade and will not last very long. Plan to install ridged panels on the rail instead. 100 watt readily available, in US next step looks as 160 watt but they looks a bit large size wise. hence the question from you with experience.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

ngtnewington Newington
 

Possibly the anchor chain caught under a larger coral head right under the bow so that in effect there was 1:1 scope. If it was blowing 40kn across a coupe of miles of fetch then the sea might have been three or four feet. Coming up short like that would put a huge strain on the chain and windlass, as I believe the snubber had already gone. I would have thought that the brake on the windlass would slip before the chain broke. Of course the chain is only as good as the weakest link.
I think the morals of that story are:

1. To always snorkel your anchor in coral waters, and re anchor if need be.
2. Have a second anchor ready to go.
3. Have a really long snubber of nylon that will stretch and can be let out as the wind builds.

This all brings us back to an earlier discussion about tandem anchors. In this instance in Suvorov it would not have helped. Two separate anchors and cables would have saved the boat.

On my first boat I sat out a gale at the Club Med Motu in Bora Bora in 1991, there were quite a few yachts in the anchorage, maybe 10. We had just sailed in from Raiatea and by dusk, having snorkelled the area I decided to lay a second anchor at 45 degrees to the first. The night started with SE 25kn and gradually veered to the South and SW peeking at 60 kn in the gusts. Two yachts were wrecked that night. My boat was only 35 ft. I could row out anchors by hand quite easily.
 With a big Amel anchor of 40kg it is still possible but harder. I have had good results using a couple of fenders slipped through the anchor itself and towing it with a load of chain and rope in the dinghy, then letting slip when the anchor is positioned. Not easy when it gets rough!

Nick ( Amelia)

On 28 Aug 2018, at 17:00, brentcameron61@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I believe that rather than morbid curiosity, the original reason to post this tragedy was because Bill R had asked if anyone had ever heard of an anchor chain breaking.  The listing for Makoko suggests they had 70 m of 12mm chain with a Spade Anchor.  The Kiwi article says that their anchor chain broke in 35-40 knots of wind.   Ian, I did find a subsequent reference on another blog of the same owners as in the article calling the boat Makoko as you had suggested.  I suspect they had just renamed her prior to this.  It's very sad.  


Brent Cameron
Future SM2K Owner



Re: Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

Brent Cameron
 

I believe that rather than morbid curiosity, the original reason to post this tragedy was because Bill R had asked if anyone had ever heard of an anchor chain breaking.  The listing for Makoko suggests they had 70 m of 12mm chain with a Spade Anchor.  The Kiwi article says that their anchor chain broke in 35-40 knots of wind.   Ian, I did find a subsequent reference on another blog of the same owners as in the article calling the boat Makoko as you had suggested.  I suspect they had just renamed her prior to this.  It's very sad.  

Brent Cameron
Future SM2K Owner


Re: Salty Dog Rally

Paul Osterberg
 

We have enrolled for the SD rally, we have attended a few Rallies and that have given us several close good friends and the camaraderie have been very nice indeed . That is the main reason for us to attend. Security is always your own responsibility. When we sailed with the Jimmy Cornell Rally from the Canaries to Barbados, one boat the steering cable broke, they were two aboard and got rather exhausted by hand steering. One of the Rally boat did sail up to them and transferred an person to their boat to help them out. I was crewing on a a boat participating in a rally up the Amazone river, great camaraderie and all boats helped out each other’s when needed. But One should not count on being helped
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259