Date   

Re: Santorin spinnaker question

greatketch@...
 

Herbert,

The stainless part that Olivier photographed is called by riggers in the USA a "Spinnaker Crane."  

There are several models available prefabricated commercially.  I am not sure if any of the available models are large/strong enough, but if you can find an appropriate one it might be more economical than a fully custom project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Santorin spinnaker question

Herbert Lackner
 

Hi Olivier,  thx for the pictures, this was exactly what I was looking for.  I will do it in a similar way. you are always such a great help!

herbert
SN120 KALI MERA



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

rossirossix4
 

I think Vetus sells one they call the Ferry seat....should have a US supplier...  https://www.mauriprosailing.com/us/product/VTSCHTBSW.html
(sold without pedestal)

Bob, KAIMI SM 429
Cannes


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Alan Leslie
 

Thanks John,
i don't have any difficulty...I have the seat!
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

JOHN HAYES
 

Alan if you have difficulty I could possibly help; but not until the last week in September when I return to NZ from Central Asia.

 

My direct email is johnhayes862@...

 

Cheers

 

John Hayes

Ngawaka

 

Wellington

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: mfmcgovern@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: Saturday, 25 August 2018 5:59 a.m.
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 

 

Alan's nav station seat appears to be manufactured in China by a company called Eastsun Marine:  http://www.eastsunmarine.com/eastsun/EnProductShow.asp?ID=152

 

I could not find it for sale anywhere except for where Alan purchased it, Burnsco in New Zealand:  https://www.burnsco.co.nz/shop/boating/seating-carpet-covers/seating/deluxe-flip-back-seat

 

I sent the company an email to see if they would ship to the USA, and if so, how much.  I will let you know if I hear back from them.

 

Mark McGovern

SM #440 Cara

Deale, MD USA

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Iridium Go Antenna

karkauai
 

That’s where mine is, Pat.

I get great reception and couldn’t be happier with it.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

On Aug 25, 2018, at 10:26 AM, sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

The easiest place for me to mount the antenna would be on the very aft starboard railing , however that means the antenna would be partially blocked from a clear view of the sky by my arch with solar panels. I guess one quadrant would be blocked , I know the signal would be better with a clear view ,but is it essential to having a good signal? It is the same location as my GPS antenna and those signals seem strong.

Thanks,

Pat

SM123



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Iridium Go Antenna

Patrick McAneny
 

If you want you can disregard the question/post about the Iridium Go antenna. I spoke with a tech support ,that did not think it a problem.
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sat, Aug 25, 2018 4:13 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Iridium Go Antenna

 
The easiest place for me to mount the antenna would be on the very aft starboard railing , however that means the antenna would be partially blocked from a clear view of the sky by my arch with solar panels. I guess one quadrant would be blocked , I know the signal would be better with a clear view ,but is it essential to having a good signal? It is the same location as my GPS antenna and those signals seem strong.
Thanks,
Pat
SM123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Patrick McAneny
 

Thanks Joel ,good to know.
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners Sent: Sat, Aug 25, 2018 3:48 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

 
Pat, the low pressure gauge failure is not uncommon. About one third of the Amels I get for resale have failed low pressure gauges and owners who have replaced them more than once...

JOEL F. POTTER
CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
Office 954-462-5869 

On Aug 25, 2018, at 3:40 PM, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
Right or wrong,good or bad, I went ahead and ran it in our fresh/brackish Sassafras River. After three years idle all went well , no leaks but I never went above 140 Lt/hr. and no where near the green zone. My low pressure gauge has never worked , it could be because I installed the system and did something wrong. Am I correct in assuming the LP pump must be working ,otherwise I would not be able to produce water ? I ran it six months like that and always got up to 160/hr. Any hints why the gauge may not be working.
Thanks,
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Sat, Aug 25, 2018 2:28 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

 
PS: A little more reading on Filmtec was interesting in that their BW and FW are indeed manufactured to very different specs than the SW, being designed for constant use in those waters.  Less pressure is used and thus energy savings are had. They've even got special membranes for maple syrup!  Who 'da thunk? An extensive technology behind it all well beyond our SW marine membranes (which are happy with BW or FW).
Craig 


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote

Hi Gary,
Yes, the reply Alan got from Dessaltator sounds very much like the reply I got from Alden Barbour that you can only use sea water to cool your refrig. At least they were straightforward enough to say that's because of the remote possibility of the freon line breaking into your water tank and you might sue them, not for any engineering reason.

The U-Tube link you gave in your post is the one I noted earlier of Rich Boren of Cruise RO saying there's no problem running your watermaker in fresh water, just keep the pressure down. So, he says, go ahead and sail the brackish Chesapeake or fresh Great Lakes and clean with fresh. Combine that with the Filmtec letter saying no problem and it's pretty clear Dessalator is simply in PYA mode. 

It would be interesting to see if Filmtec would supply an explanation of any technical difference in their membranes designated for salt/brackish/fresh water membranes? It sounds like marketing, not engineering, or, possibly, the BW and FW membranes are engineered such that they will pass salts but not bacteria so one could use  the SW in BW or FW but not vice versa, but I'm just guessing on that. 

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyac htowners@..., wrote :

I find that reply from Dessalator quite intriguing.  I cannot speak to that statement exactly, because my watermaker was 'hybridized' some time ago and is not purely Dessalator any more but here is one possibility why they (Dessalator) would be so adamant about fresh water usage. 

Even though the the membrane(s) are fine pushing low volumes of fresh water through them when rinsing or even when doing the "double-RO" function, it is not what they were designed for.  The membranes from Filmetch come in specific version for salt water, brackish water and fresh water.  The one I have installed is definitely bred for saltwater (Model SW30-2540).  The SW actually stands for Sea Water.  There are BW (Brackish Water, TW (freshwater or Tap Water) and a couple of others I think (a nano-filter and a low energy usage membrane). 

At any rate, the SW30-2540 membrane is indeed technically designed for Sea Water so I get where Dessalator is coming from.  However, talking with two different water maker experts (Cruise RO and Dessalator Malta) and coupled with my own experience I will say that testing and backflushing with filtered fresh water, even running the high pressure pump to provide a testable water sample would not cause harm. As mentioned, don't let the flow go high, as fresh water will pass cleanly through the membrane at much lower pressure). 

I would not, however, use the watermaker in fresh or brackish water for the long term without swapping to a purpose-designed membrane for it. 

Here's a brief video on the subject.  ... https://youtu.be/Ht2B3lpFbdQ 


There you have an "official" 2 cents worth :)

Gary W.
s/v Adagio
Malta



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Alan Leslie
 

Interestingly on Page 26 ...it says "....the VETUS desalinator......"

Were VETUS selling Dessalator products at that time ? ....or ....??

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

amelforme
 

Pat, the low pressure gauge failure is not uncommon. About one third of the Amels I get for resale have failed low pressure gauges and owners who have replaced them more than once...

JOEL F. POTTER
CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
Office 954-462-5869 

On Aug 25, 2018, at 3:40 PM, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Right or wrong,good or bad, I went ahead and ran it in our fresh/brackish Sassafras River. After three years idle all went well , no leaks but I never went above 140 Lt/hr. and no where near the green zone. My low pressure gauge has never worked , it could be because I installed the system and did something wrong. Am I correct in assuming the LP pump must be working ,otherwise I would not be able to produce water ? I ran it six months like that and always got up to 160/hr. Any hints why the gauge may not be working.

Thanks,
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Sat, Aug 25, 2018 2:28 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

 
PS: A little more reading on Filmtec was interesting in that their BW and FW are indeed manufactured to very different specs than the SW, being designed for constant use in those waters.  Less pressure is used and thus energy savings are had. They've even got special membranes for maple syrup!  Who 'da thunk? An extensive technology behind it all well beyond our SW marine membranes (which are happy with BW or FW).
Craig 


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote

Hi Gary,
Yes, the reply Alan got from Dessaltator sounds very much like the reply I got from Alden Barbour that you can only use sea water to cool your refrig. At least they were straightforward enough to say that's because of the remote possibility of the freon line breaking into your water tank and you might sue them, not for any engineering reason.

The U-Tube link you gave in your post is the one I noted earlier of Rich Boren of Cruise RO saying there's no problem running your watermaker in fresh water, just keep the pressure down. So, he says, go ahead and sail the brackish Chesapeake or fresh Great Lakes and clean with fresh. Combine that with the Filmtec letter saying no problem and it's pretty clear Dessalator is simply in PYA mode. 

It would be interesting to see if Filmtec would supply an explanation of any technical difference in their membranes designated for salt/brackish/fresh water membranes? It sounds like marketing, not engineering, or, possibly, the BW and FW membranes are engineered such that they will pass salts but not bacteria so one could use  the SW in BW or FW but not vice versa, but I'm just guessing on that. 

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyac htowners@..., wrote :

I find that reply from Dessalator quite intriguing.  I cannot speak to that statement exactly, because my watermaker was 'hybridized' some time ago and is not purely Dessalator any more but here is one possibility why they (Dessalator) would be so adamant about fresh water usage. 

Even though the the membrane(s) are fine pushing low volumes of fresh water through them when rinsing or even when doing the "double-RO" function, it is not what they were designed for.  The membranes from Filmetch come in specific version for salt water, brackish water and fresh water.  The one I have installed is definitely bred for saltwater (Model SW30-2540).  The SW actually stands for Sea Water.  There are BW (Brackish Water, TW (freshwater or Tap Water) and a couple of others I think (a nano-filter and a low energy usage membrane). 

At any rate, the SW30-2540 membrane is indeed technically designed for Sea Water so I get where Dessalator is coming from.  However, talking with two different water maker experts (Cruise RO and Dessalator Malta) and coupled with my own experience I will say that testing and backflushing with filtered fresh water, even running the high pressure pump to provide a testable water sample would not cause harm. As mentioned, don't let the flow go high, as fresh water will pass cleanly through the membrane at much lower pressure). 

I would not, however, use the watermaker in fresh or brackish water for the long term without swapping to a purpose-designed membrane for it. 

Here's a brief video on the subject.  ... https://youtu.be/Ht2B3lpFbdQ 


There you have an "official" 2 cents worth :)

Gary W.
s/v Adagio
Malta



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Patrick McAneny
 

Right or wrong,good or bad, I went ahead and ran it in our fresh/brackish Sassafras River. After three years idle all went well , no leaks but I never went above 140 Lt/hr. and no where near the green zone. My low pressure gauge has never worked , it could be because I installed the system and did something wrong. Am I correct in assuming the LP pump must be working ,otherwise I would not be able to produce water ? I ran it six months like that and always got up to 160/hr. Any hints why the gauge may not be working.
Thanks,
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: sangaris@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sat, Aug 25, 2018 2:28 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

 
PS: A little more reading on Filmtec was interesting in that their BW and FW are indeed manufactured to very different specs than the SW, being designed for constant use in those waters.  Less pressure is used and thus energy savings are had. They've even got special membranes for maple syrup!  Who 'da thunk? An extensive technology behind it all well beyond our SW marine membranes (which are happy with BW or FW).
Craig 


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote

Hi Gary,
Yes, the reply Alan got from Dessaltator sounds very much like the reply I got from Alden Barbour that you can only use sea water to cool your refrig. At least they were straightforward enough to say that's because of the remote possibility of the freon line breaking into your water tank and you might sue them, not for any engineering reason.

The U-Tube link you gave in your post is the one I noted earlier of Rich Boren of Cruise RO saying there's no problem running your watermaker in fresh water, just keep the pressure down. So, he says, go ahead and sail the brackish Chesapeake or fresh Great Lakes and clean with fresh. Combine that with the Filmtec letter saying no problem and it's pretty clear Dessalator is simply in PYA mode. 

It would be interesting to see if Filmtec would supply an explanation of any technical difference in their membranes designated for salt/brackish/fresh water membranes? It sounds like marketing, not engineering, or, possibly, the BW and FW membranes are engineered such that they will pass salts but not bacteria so one could use  the SW in BW or FW but not vice versa, but I'm just guessing on that. 

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyac htowners@..., wrote :

I find that reply from Dessalator quite intriguing.  I cannot speak to that statement exactly, because my watermaker was 'hybridized' some time ago and is not purely Dessalator any more but here is one possibility why they (Dessalator) would be so adamant about fresh water usage. 

Even though the the membrane(s) are fine pushing low volumes of fresh water through them when rinsing or even when doing the "double-RO" function, it is not what they were designed for.  The membranes from Filmetch come in specific version for salt water, brackish water and fresh water.  The one I have installed is definitely bred for saltwater (Model SW30-2540).  The SW actually stands for Sea Water.  There are BW (Brackish Water, TW (freshwater or Tap Water) and a couple of others I think (a nano-filter and a low energy usage membrane). 

At any rate, the SW30-2540 membrane is indeed technically designed for Sea Water so I get where Dessalator is coming from.  However, talking with two different water maker experts (Cruise RO and Dessalator Malta) and coupled with my own experience I will say that testing and backflushing with filtered fresh water, even running the high pressure pump to provide a testable water sample would not cause harm. As mentioned, don't let the flow go high, as fresh water will pass cleanly through the membrane at much lower pressure). 

I would not, however, use the watermaker in fresh or brackish water for the long term without swapping to a purpose-designed membrane for it. 

Here's a brief video on the subject.  ... https://youtu.be/Ht2B3lpFbdQ 


There you have an "official" 2 cents worth :)

Gary W.
s/v Adagio
Malta



Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Craig Briggs
 

PS: A little more reading on Filmtec was interesting in that their BW and FW are indeed manufactured to very different specs than the SW, being designed for constant use in those waters.  Less pressure is used and thus energy savings are had. They've even got special membranes for maple syrup!  Who 'da thunk? An extensive technology behind it all well beyond our SW marine membranes (which are happy with BW or FW).
Craig 


---In amelyachtowners@..., <sangaris@...> wrote

Hi Gary,
Yes, the reply Alan got from Dessaltator sounds very much like the reply I got from Alden Barbour that you can only use sea water to cool your refrig. At least they were straightforward enough to say that's because of the remote possibility of the freon line breaking into your water tank and you might sue them, not for any engineering reason.

The U-Tube link you gave in your post is the one I noted earlier of Rich Boren of Cruise RO saying there's no problem running your watermaker in fresh water, just keep the pressure down. So, he says, go ahead and sail the brackish Chesapeake or fresh Great Lakes and clean with fresh. Combine that with the Filmtec letter saying no problem and it's pretty clear Dessalator is simply in PYA mode. 

It would be interesting to see if Filmtec would supply an explanation of any technical difference in their membranes designated for salt/brackish/fresh water membranes? It sounds like marketing, not engineering, or, possibly, the BW and FW membranes are engineered such that they will pass salts but not bacteria so one could use  the SW in BW or FW but not vice versa, but I'm just guessing on that. 

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyachtowners@..., <gary@...> wrote :

I find that reply from Dessalator quite intriguing.  I cannot speak to that statement exactly, because my watermaker was 'hybridized' some time ago and is not purely Dessalator any more but here is one possibility why they (Dessalator) would be so adamant about fresh water usage. 

Even though the the membrane(s) are fine pushing low volumes of fresh water through them when rinsing or even when doing the "double-RO" function, it is not what they were designed for.  The membranes from Filmetch come in specific version for salt water, brackish water and fresh water.  The one I have installed is definitely bred for saltwater (Model SW30-2540).  The SW actually stands for Sea Water.  There are BW (Brackish Water, TW (freshwater or Tap Water) and a couple of others I think (a nano-filter and a low energy usage membrane). 

At any rate, the SW30-2540 membrane is indeed technically designed for Sea Water so I get where Dessalator is coming from.  However, talking with two different water maker experts (Cruise RO and Dessalator Malta) and coupled with my own experience I will say that testing and backflushing with filtered fresh water, even running the high pressure pump to provide a testable water sample would not cause harm. As mentioned, don't let the flow go high, as fresh water will pass cleanly through the membrane at much lower pressure). 

I would not, however, use the watermaker in fresh or brackish water for the long term without swapping to a purpose-designed membrane for it. 

Here's a brief video on the subject.  ... https://youtu.be/Ht2B3lpFbdQ 


There you have an "official" 2 cents worth :)

Gary W.
s/v Adagio
Malta



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Mark Erdos
 

Thanks!!!!

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, August 25, 2018 9:23 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

 

 

I have uploaded scans of the sections of the manual that I have in English translation to the file section.  It includes the temperature/salinity/production rate graph and the pickling and cleaning procedures. Note that the maximum potable water flow rate is indicated on the graph as 120% of rated capacity, but not spelled out in detail in the text.

 

Interestingly, I also have a full manual in French, but it is not identical in all detail.  The French manual is less complete, and has several odd, and significant, errors that are not present in the English version.  Both were included in the original delivery paperwork with the boat from Amel.

 

Since the French manual is a generic one for all of the models in the Dessalator line at the time, while the English version is specific to the model Amel installed, I suspect that Amel might have done the translation, especially since the format of the document matches some of the others that originated with Amel at the time.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD, USA



---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Bill,

 

Would you be so kind as to upload the graphs and instruction manual you have. My manual did not include this stuff and has little info on preserving membranes. If you could put it in the Amel files section, this would be great. Thanks!

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 


Iridium Go Antenna

Patrick McAneny
 

The easiest place for me to mount the antenna would be on the very aft starboard railing , however that means the antenna would be partially blocked from a clear view of the sky by my arch with solar panels. I guess one quadrant would be blocked , I know the signal would be better with a clear view ,but is it essential to having a good signal? It is the same location as my GPS antenna and those signals seem strong.

Thanks,

Pat

SM123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Micron 66 Caribbean experience

Dan Carlson
 

Thanks for sharing the experiences.  I think that I will get a couple gallons, light sand and focus on the waterline, bow and rudder.  

My plans are to haul again next hurricane season and then apply a proper two coats at that time, with 3rd coat at waterline and leading edges.


Best regards, Dan & Lori Carlson on SM387, sv BeBe 




On Fri, Aug 24, 2018 at 4:33 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]
wrote:
 


Dan & Lori,

We use a similar ablative paint, and put on two coats every haul out. In the Caribbean 24 months is pushing it, but it you clean regularly it works.  With ablative paints be sure to clean gently, you do not want to be scrubbing off the paint!

An extra coat within a foot of the waterline, the bow, and the leading edge of the keel, and rudder also help.

I have had excellent experience with Micron66 in the colder waters of San Francisco Bay on my old boat.  We have avoided using it on Harmonie because we regularly end up going places with relatively fresh water (e.g., Florida Rivers, and the upper Chesapeake).  Micron 66 fails in very short order in freshwater. 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA




---In amelyachtowners@..., <mcerdos@...> wrote :

Dan,

 

I slap a couple of coats on whenever I haul. The Micron 66 is ablative and is going to flake off as it is designed to do. Last summer in Grenada, we put three coats on. It had been two and half year since the last haul and the bottom paint was thin.  When we hauled in Curacao (unexpectedly) a couple of months ago, we had them put two coats on after a light sand. We have no issues with growth or barnacles.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 10:51 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Micron 66 Caribbean experience

 

 

Hello Amel owners,  I know from discussions that many of you use Micron 66 bottom paint in the Caribbean. I'm looking for responses from those with specific experience.  I put 2 coats on the bottom of my boat in Nov of 2017 and sailed the eastern Caribbean for 7 months. We hauled in Curacao last June (the bottom was very clean). We go back in November to sail the western Caribbean for the next 7 months with plans to haul again in June of 2019.  Question for those who have done something similar. Do you just scuff the boat and relaunch and only paint every other year? Or do you put a fresh coat on each year while the boat is out and dry? Looking for boaters with actual experience with this scenario.  As an added note, when the water is clean I regularly go for a swim with a scrubber to keep the bottom clean.  I have the idea that we may be in more places in the western Caribben where I might not want to do that as often.  

 

Thanks, Dan and Lori Carlson, SM387, sv BeBe


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine fuel filters

Dan Carlson
 

Two years ago when my fuel level was down below 100 liters I opened the inspection ports on the fuel tanks and inspected the inside of the tank. There were several small patches of sludge on the bottom of the tank. I attached a 2 meter length of small fuel hose to the fuel tank dip stick with a few zipties and connected my 5 liter fluid extractor to it and was able to direct the end of the hose exactly to the sludge and suck it out of the tank.  The article Bill posted shows Nigel Calder using this same system to clean his tank.  I recommend it. But the fuel level has to be very low to see the bottom of the tank.  
I replaced the rubber gaskets on the inspection ports at the same time. You must be sure to get the right fuel resistant rubber gasket material or it will disolve.

Regards, Dan & Lori on SM387, sv BeBe




On Fri, Aug 24, 2018 at 9:52 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]
wrote:
 

Thanks to Ian Jenkins, I had Amel install a third fuel filter on Kimberlite when it was built.

When fuel goes into the tank , it is first pumped through a huge racor filter similar to that which you find on a fuel pump.  After that filter  I have always used a 2 micron filter before it enters the third filter on the engine.

At full rpm’s I see no increase on the vacuum gauge on my racor filter. I have been running this setup for 6400 engine hours so far.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 9:15 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Long block failure on a Volvo D3-110 Amel 54-152

 

 

Hi All,

   with our TAMD22 we ran a 2 micon Racor without issue.    

 

                  John

SV Annie SM #37

Le Marin  

 

 

On Fri, Aug 24, 2018 at 4:42 AM Rudolf Waldispuehl Rudolf@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thomas and Bill 

Good points. I’m still learning to handle a modern Diesel Engine. 

 

Maybe it is better to go for 1-2 micron Racor filter instead of the recommended 10 micron in order to filter out as much as possible. Or does the Engine suffer from the reduced flow rate?

 

Cheers

Ruedi 

Ruedi & Sabina Waldispuehl

"SY WASABI“, Amel 54. #55

Korfu

 

Von: <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of "'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Antworten an: <amelyachtowners@...>
Datum: Mittwoch, 22. August 2018 um 21:24
An: <amelyachtowners@...>
Betreff: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Long block failure on a Volvo D3-110 Amel 54-152

 

 

 

That’s a great article, Bill, thanks for sharing. 

 

It’s good to see Nigel opening the debate about what needs to happen to adress the issues of modern engines in marine environments. It seems to point towards fuel quality. The corollary being inadaquate onboard filtering. 

I wonder what it means for fuel additives and their adequacy for our problems. Naively I would think that any product that dissolves contaminants simply makes them smaller so potentially riskier for high pressure common rail injectors (ie pass through filters but still too big for injectors)? 

 

Another topic is the established advice that a diesel engine enjoys being run at 80%, and failing that, at least push it hard from time to time. How much of this is still relevant to modern engines with better fuel efficiency (so less residue at low regime I presume) and variable geometry turbos?

 

I don’t have the first clue about those questions but i would like to understand what bits of the marine diesel knowledge base apply to our modern engines. 

 

 

Best,

 

 

Thomas

soon back onboard 

GARULFO

A54-122

Curaçao

 

 

 

On Sat, 18 Aug 2018 at 04:07, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

There was a good article on the worrisome trend in the design of small marine diesels in Yachting Monthly last year.. 

 

 

I am beginning to wonder if we have almost seen the end of diesels that reliably run for more than 10,000 hours.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

greatketch@...
 

I have uploaded scans of the sections of the manual that I have in English translation to the file section.  It includes the temperature/salinity/production rate graph and the pickling and cleaning procedures. Note that the maximum potable water flow rate is indicated on the graph as 120% of rated capacity, but not spelled out in detail in the text.

Interestingly, I also have a full manual in French, but it is not identical in all detail.  The French manual is less complete, and has several odd, and significant, errors that are not present in the English version.  Both were included in the original delivery paperwork with the boat from Amel.

Since the French manual is a generic one for all of the models in the Dessalator line at the time, while the English version is specific to the model Amel installed, I suspect that Amel might have done the translation, especially since the format of the document matches some of the others that originated with Amel at the time.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


---In amelyachtowners@..., <mcerdos@...> wrote :

Bill,

 

Would you be so kind as to upload the graphs and instruction manual you have. My manual did not include this stuff and has little info on preserving membranes. If you could put it in the Amel files section, this would be great. Thanks!

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us



New file uploaded to amelyachtowners

amelyachtowners@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the amelyachtowners
group.

File : /SM160 Dessalator Manual English.pdf
Uploaded by : bill_9895 <greatketch@...>
Description : Dessalator (or maybe Amel?) translation of their manual for the Series Amel 50 l/hr watermaker installed on SM160. These changed a lot in new models, so be sure this applies to you! This model has 24 x 3 inch membranes, no feed pump, 24 volts only.

You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/files/SM160%20Dessalator%20Manual%20English.pdf

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398

Regards,

bill_9895 <greatketch@...>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Patrick McAneny
 

To those interested in the reversible nav seat , I found them available on Ebay for $360. , they apparently only have one color ,dark blue with white piping.
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: mfmcgovern@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Fri, Aug 24, 2018 1:59 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 
Alan's nav station seat appears to be manufactured in China by a company called Eastsun Marine:  http://www.eastsunmarine.com/eastsun/EnProductShow.asp?ID=152

I could not find it for sale anywhere except for where Alan purchased it, Burnsco in New Zealand:  https://www.burnsco.co.nz/shop/boating/seating-carpet-covers/seating/deluxe-flip-back-seat

I sent the company an email to see if they would ship to the USA, and if so, how much.  I will let you know if I hear back from them.

Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


 


Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Gary,
Yes, the reply Alan got from Dessaltator sounds very much like the reply I got from Alden Barbour that you can only use sea water to cool your refrig. At least they were straightforward enough to say that's because of the remote possibility of the freon line breaking into your water tank and you might sue them, not for any engineering reason.

The U-Tube link you gave in your post is the one I noted earlier of Rich Boren of Cruise RO saying there's no problem running your watermaker in fresh water, just keep the pressure down. So, he says, go ahead and sail the brackish Chesapeake or fresh Great Lakes and clean with fresh. Combine that with the Filmtec letter saying no problem and it's pretty clear Dessalator is simply in PYA mode. 

It would be interesting to see if Filmtec would supply an explanation of any technical difference in their membranes designated for salt/brackish/fresh water membranes? It sounds like marketing, not engineering, or, possibly, the BW and FW membranes are engineered such that they will pass salts but not bacteria so one could use  the SW in BW or FW but not vice versa, but I'm just guessing on that. 

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyachtowners@..., <gary@...> wrote :

I find that reply from Dessalator quite intriguing.  I cannot speak to that statement exactly, because my watermaker was 'hybridized' some time ago and is not purely Dessalator any more but here is one possibility why they (Dessalator) would be so adamant about fresh water usage. 

Even though the the membrane(s) are fine pushing low volumes of fresh water through them when rinsing or even when doing the "double-RO" function, it is not what they were designed for.  The membranes from Filmetch come in specific version for salt water, brackish water and fresh water.  The one I have installed is definitely bred for saltwater (Model SW30-2540).  The SW actually stands for Sea Water.  There are BW (Brackish Water, TW (freshwater or Tap Water) and a couple of others I think (a nano-filter and a low energy usage membrane). 

At any rate, the SW30-2540 membrane is indeed technically designed for Sea Water so I get where Dessalator is coming from.  However, talking with two different water maker experts (Cruise RO and Dessalator Malta) and coupled with my own experience I will say that testing and backflushing with filtered fresh water, even running the high pressure pump to provide a testable water sample would not cause harm. As mentioned, don't let the flow go high, as fresh water will pass cleanly through the membrane at much lower pressure). 

I would not, however, use the watermaker in fresh or brackish water for the long term without swapping to a purpose-designed membrane for it. 

Here's a brief video on the subject.  ... https://youtu.be/Ht2B3lpFbdQ 


There you have an "official" 2 cents worth :)

Gary W.
s/v Adagio
Malta