Date   
Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Permanent 24 to 12 v converter

karkauai
 

Hi Paul,
On Kristy, there are five 24-12v converters. 
One of the green Sailors is marked Permanent.  It is always connected directly to the battery bank and allows your AM/FM radio to hold it’s “memory” of radio stations.  I’ve also wired my 12v charging equipment (cigarette lighter and USB).  There are connection points in the wires (+ & -) in the battery compartment with fuses.

The two other of the green Sailor converters feed the nav equipment and VHF.  They are wired to the onboard of the three breakers in the hanging locker.

A fourth converter is for the SSB and is controlled by the middle breaker in the hanging locker.

The fifth converter feeds the amplifier for my stereo system and is connected to the outboard of the three breakers in the hanging locker.

I don’t have any converters mounted anywhere else.


Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dome light in aft lazarette needs replacing

amelforme
 

Hi Derick.
When your SM53 #400 was built for me originally, I ordered optional lights for both the cockpit port side locker and the stern locker. Amel had a fairly extensive list of options that we didn’t actively sell but could respond in the positive if someone asked for additions and enhancements.
I can’t remember what these extra lights look like so if they are different than the other lights fitted elsewhere, send a photo to Apres Vende and see what they can do for you. 
When you are finished enjoying Brava, please keep me in mind.

Have fun on your Amel! Joel

JOEL F. POTTER
CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
Office 954-462-5869 

On May 28, 2018, at 4:03 PM, derickgates@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,


After five years of ownership, I just discovered that the aft lazarette has a dome light. How did I find it? I was cleaning out the lazarette at night and noticed a light was on.  Having discovered the dome light, I went to switch it off.  Instead, it just dimmed to about 1/3 the intensity.  I tapped on the dome a little too hard, and found that the glass of the dome was now in 3 pieces, but the light still would not turn off.  Switching off the aft lights on the 24 volt panel did cut the power to the dome light, but otherwise it looks like the switch in the dome light is faulty and needs replacing.


Does anyone know where to get these dome light fixtures?  


Derick Gates

SM2K#400

Brava

Currently on the hard in Antigua for hurricane season

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Dan Carlson
 

That sounds like a good idea.

One build on that recco however, you either want to have removed the winch handle or make sure the area is well clear, as the winch will spin very fast as the traveller moves across.

Dan and Lori Carlson, sv BeBe, SM#387




On Tue, May 29, 2018 at 7:55 AM, Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners]
 

One minor point if you haven’t come across it.
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dome light in aft lazarette needs replacing

amelforme
 

Hi Derick.
When your SM53 #400 was built for me originally, I ordered optional lights for both the cockpit port side locker and the stern locker. Amel had a fairly extensive list of options that we didn’t actively sell but could respond in the positive if someone asked for additions and enhancements.
I can’t remember what these extra lights look like so if they are different than the other lights fitted elsewhere, send a photo to Apres Vende and see what they can do for you. 
When you are finished enjoying Brava, please keep me in mind.

Have fun on your Amel! Joel

JOEL F. POTTER
CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
Office 954-462-5869 

On May 28, 2018, at 4:03 PM, derickgates@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,


After five years of ownership, I just discovered that the aft lazarette has a dome light. How did I find it? I was cleaning out the lazarette at night and noticed a light was on.  Having discovered the dome light, I went to switch it off.  Instead, it just dimmed to about 1/3 the intensity.  I tapped on the dome a little too hard, and found that the glass of the dome was now in 3 pieces, but the light still would not turn off.  Switching off the aft lights on the 24 volt panel did cut the power to the dome light, but otherwise it looks like the switch in the dome light is faulty and needs replacing.


Does anyone know where to get these dome light fixtures?  


Derick Gates

SM2K#400

Brava

Currently on the hard in Antigua for hurricane season

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Ian Park
 

One minor point if you haven’t come across it.
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)

Permanent 24 to 12 v converter

Paul Osterberg
 

Hello!

We have three 24 volt converters under the navigation table, market blu, Inmarsat and instrument. The strange thing is if I close the circlet breaker for each of them, I still have 12 volt on the terminals behind the panel just above the nav table that are labeled permanent. Does anyone know where on the SM I can’t find the “permanent”  24 to 12 v volt converter?


Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: A54 Sleipner bowthruster uneven brush wear

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi Bill,

I agree the motor is probably fine, as it can run in one direction. 
I can hear the big Albright double-solenoid motor-reversing contactor click for both starboard and port operation. So joystick is innocent.

I think i know what 4 relays you mean (in the plastic junction box) but didn't foresee they played a part in the thrusting operation. I assumed it was only the raising/lowering of the thruster, and that my problem was closer to the Side-Power unit. 

I measured voltage on the Albright contactor posts in port/starboard/idle operation to see if I can reverse engineer what is supposed to happen to the 4 power cables going into the motor. Need to look at the results with a fresh pair of eyes in the morning. And maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree.


Thanks as always,


Thomas 
GARULFO
AMEL 54 #122
Bonaire 


On Mon, 28 May 2018 at 21:02, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thomas,

It is probably not the motor and is either the joystick or one of the 4 relays. 

Eliminate the joystick first. 

It is unlikely that your relays are numbered because out of about 10 54s, I have only seen 1 with numbered relays, but they are all the same relay. If all 54s are wired the same, I think it will be relay #2, but, if you have a spare relay, it is easy enough to replace them one at a time until you find the culprit. Of course the problem can be corrosion between the relay terminals and the female spade connectors.

If I owned a 54, I would have 4 spare relays.

Good Luck!

On Mon, May 28, 2018 at 4:22 PM, 'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi Scott,

Talking of the devil...

I haven't looked into the carbon dust and brushes yet, cause I reconnected the thruster for a quick stop in a marina and after the initial 'all-good' tests, it decided to only thrust to port and not starboard....
So I've got a second issue to troubleshoot. If anyone has experienced it and has clues, it's very welcome. 

I'll check the state of the brushes for uneven wear too, to give you another data point. 
Note that i don't have an oil reservoir in my unit.


Fair winds to all,

Thomas
GARULFO
AMEL 54 #122
Bonaire 

On Mon, 28 May 2018 at 05:54, cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...> wrote:

Craig,


Answers to your questions below:

1) After we let it cool down (~30 minutes) it ran fine. Perhaps a bit weaker but that's probably to be expected considering that some of the brushes have worn down considerably and actually even cracked, exposing just bare conductors. My fear is that going forward, it will continue to overheat prematurely and leave us without a bow thruster when we most need it.

2) The sidepower bowthruster has a drain plug underwater between the two props and a fill reservoir in the bow locker. Obviously oil is changed on the hard. My understanding is that the way to change the oil is to open the plug and continue filling the reservoir until the oil coming out of the plug looks clean. That way, you don't get air into the system.

The mechanic drained all of the oil and he put the plug back and filled the reservoir. The next day, the oil level had dropped, indicating that the air migrated upwards (and/or the thick oil slowly migrated downwards). This drop in oil level continued for a few days. It seems reasonably stable now, but I'm unsure whether some air was still stuck in the gearleg and never made its way out..


Also, we now have a strong "Mass -" leak. Thomas of S/V Garulfo posted that he had a bow thruster leak, possibly from carbon dust. I'll go check that now and report back.

But in general, any idea why the carbon brushes would be wearing so unevenly?


Scott

A54 #69 

S/V Tengah 




---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :


Hi Scott,

Your post raises a couple of questions. 
1. You say the unit had a thermal shutdown - did it work after it cooled  down?  Any problems?
2. In what way did the mechanic have trouble getting air out of the system? On the SN and SM one simply turns the bottom section upside down to drain and then pours in new oil. No issue with air. Perhaps the 54 is a different design that I'm not familiar with.

Craig



Hi all,


I was coming into the quay at Zante yesterday in our A54 with about 10-15 knots on the beam and used the sidepower bow thruster in 10-15 second bursts and all of the sudden, thermal shutdown!


After executing an exciting no thruster stern-to med mooring into a tight spot (with expectant spectators!) I opened up the bow thruster compartment to see a lot of carbon dust. I took the motor cover off and inspected the brushes and found that for each of the pairs (4 pairs, 8 total brushes), one was worn MUCH more than the other one. On some pairs, it's the top one that was worn more, on some, it was the bottom one. Some brushes were down to loose wire.


On the attached photo, you can see the extent of the uneven wear for one pair.


We recently had the boatyard change the bowthruster oil and they drained it all before adding new oil, which resulted in challenges getting all the air out of the system. We then completed a 1350 mile passage. These probably have nothing to do with it, but maybe I'm wrong.


Before I go out and spend money to replace the brushes and possibly experience similar uneven wear, anyone have any ideas as to why this happened and how to rectify it?


Thanks!


Scott

A54 #69 

S/V Tengah 



 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: A54 Sleipner bowthruster uneven brush wear

 

Thomas,

It could be the large high amperage electro magnetic switch on the motor...sorry I left that out by mistake

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, May 28, 2018 at 8:01 PM, Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thomas,

It is probably not the motor and is either the joystick or one of the 4 relays. 

Eliminate the joystick first. 

It is unlikely that your relays are numbered because out of about 10 54s, I have only seen 1 with numbered relays, but they are all the same relay. If all 54s are wired the same, I think it will be relay #2, but, if you have a spare relay, it is easy enough to replace them one at a time until you find the culprit. Of course the problem can be corrosion between the relay terminals and the female spade connectors.

If I owned a 54, I would have 4 spare relays.

Good Luck!

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, May 28, 2018 at 4:22 PM, 'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hi Scott,

Talking of the devil...

I haven't looked into the carbon dust and brushes yet, cause I reconnected the thruster for a quick stop in a marina and after the initial 'all-good' tests, it decided to only thrust to port and not starboard....
So I've got a second issue to troubleshoot. If anyone has experienced it and has clues, it's very welcome. 

I'll check the state of the brushes for uneven wear too, to give you another data point. 
Note that i don't have an oil reservoir in my unit.


Fair winds to all,

Thomas
GARULFO
AMEL 54 #122
Bonaire 

On Mon, 28 May 2018 at 05:54, cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Craig,


Answers to your questions below:

1) After we let it cool down (~30 minutes) it ran fine. Perhaps a bit weaker but that's probably to be expected considering that some of the brushes have worn down considerably and actually even cracked, exposing just bare conductors. My fear is that going forward, it will continue to overheat prematurely and leave us without a bow thruster when we most need it.

2) The sidepower bowthruster has a drain plug underwater between the two props and a fill reservoir in the bow locker. Obviously oil is changed on the hard. My understanding is that the way to change the oil is to open the plug and continue filling the reservoir until the oil coming out of the plug looks clean. That way, you don't get air into the system.

The mechanic drained all of the oil and he put the plug back and filled the reservoir. The next day, the oil level had dropped, indicating that the air migrated upwards (and/or the thick oil slowly migrated downwards). This drop in oil level continued for a few days. It seems reasonably stable now, but I'm unsure whether some air was still stuck in the gearleg and never made its way out..

Also, we now have a strong "Mass -" leak. Thomas of S/V Garulfo posted that he had a bow thruster leak, possibly from carbon dust. I'll go check that now and report back.

But in general, any idea why the carbon brushes would be wearing so unevenly?


Scott

A54 #69 

S/V Tengah 




---In amelyachtowners@...m, wrote :




Hi Scott,

Your post raises a couple of questions. 
1. You say the unit had a thermal shutdown - did it work after it cooled  down?  Any problems?
2. In what way did the mechanic have trouble getting air out of the system? On the SN and SM one simply turns the bottom section upside down to drain and then pours in new oil. No issue with air. Perhaps the 54 is a different design that I'm not familiar with.

Craig


---In amelyachtowners@...m, <no_reply@...> wrote :

Hi all,


I was coming into the quay at Zante yesterday in our A54 with about 10-15 knots on the beam and used the sidepower bow thruster in 10-15 second bursts and all of the sudden, thermal shutdown!


After executing an exciting no thruster stern-to med mooring into a tight spot (with expectant spectators!) I opened up the bow thruster compartment to see a lot of carbon dust. I took the motor cover off and inspected the brushes and found that for each of the pairs (4 pairs, 8 total brushes), one was worn MUCH more than the other one. On some pairs, it's the top one that was worn more, on some, it was the bottom one. Some brushes were down to loose wire.


On the attached photo, you can see the extent of the uneven wear for one pair.


We recently had the boatyard change the bowthruster oil and they drained it all before adding new oil, which resulted in challenges getting all the air out of the system. We then completed a 1350 mile passage. These probably have nothing to do with it, but maybe I'm wrong.


Before I go out and spend money to replace the brushes and possibly experience similar uneven wear, anyone have any ideas as to why this happened and how to rectify it?


Thanks!


Scott

A54 #69 

S/V Tengah 



 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: A54 Sleipner bowthruster uneven brush wear

 

Thomas,

It is probably not the motor and is either the joystick or one of the 4 relays. 

Eliminate the joystick first. 

It is unlikely that your relays are numbered because out of about 10 54s, I have only seen 1 with numbered relays, but they are all the same relay. If all 54s are wired the same, I think it will be relay #2, but, if you have a spare relay, it is easy enough to replace them one at a time until you find the culprit. Of course the problem can be corrosion between the relay terminals and the female spade connectors.

If I owned a 54, I would have 4 spare relays.

Good Luck!

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, May 28, 2018 at 4:22 PM, 'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Scott,

Talking of the devil...

I haven't looked into the carbon dust and brushes yet, cause I reconnected the thruster for a quick stop in a marina and after the initial 'all-good' tests, it decided to only thrust to port and not starboard....
So I've got a second issue to troubleshoot. If anyone has experienced it and has clues, it's very welcome. 

I'll check the state of the brushes for uneven wear too, to give you another data point. 
Note that i don't have an oil reservoir in my unit.


Fair winds to all,

Thomas
GARULFO
AMEL 54 #122
Bonaire 

On Mon, 28 May 2018 at 05:54, cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Craig,


Answers to your questions below:

1) After we let it cool down (~30 minutes) it ran fine. Perhaps a bit weaker but that's probably to be expected considering that some of the brushes have worn down considerably and actually even cracked, exposing just bare conductors. My fear is that going forward, it will continue to overheat prematurely and leave us without a bow thruster when we most need it.

2) The sidepower bowthruster has a drain plug underwater between the two props and a fill reservoir in the bow locker. Obviously oil is changed on the hard. My understanding is that the way to change the oil is to open the plug and continue filling the reservoir until the oil coming out of the plug looks clean. That way, you don't get air into the system.

The mechanic drained all of the oil and he put the plug back and filled the reservoir. The next day, the oil level had dropped, indicating that the air migrated upwards (and/or the thick oil slowly migrated downwards). This drop in oil level continued for a few days. It seems reasonably stable now, but I'm unsure whether some air was still stuck in the gearleg and never made its way out..

Also, we now have a strong "Mass -" leak. Thomas of S/V Garulfo posted that he had a bow thruster leak, possibly from carbon dust. I'll go check that now and report back.

But in general, any idea why the carbon brushes would be wearing so unevenly?


Scott

A54 #69 

S/V Tengah 





Hi Scott,

Your post raises a couple of questions. 
1. You say the unit had a thermal shutdown - did it work after it cooled  down?  Any problems?
2. In what way did the mechanic have trouble getting air out of the system? On the SN and SM one simply turns the bottom section upside down to drain and then pours in new oil. No issue with air. Perhaps the 54 is a different design that I'm not familiar with.

Craig


---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, <no_reply@...> wrote :

Hi all,


I was coming into the quay at Zante yesterday in our A54 with about 10-15 knots on the beam and used the sidepower bow thruster in 10-15 second bursts and all of the sudden, thermal shutdown!


After executing an exciting no thruster stern-to med mooring into a tight spot (with expectant spectators!) I opened up the bow thruster compartment to see a lot of carbon dust. I took the motor cover off and inspected the brushes and found that for each of the pairs (4 pairs, 8 total brushes), one was worn MUCH more than the other one. On some pairs, it's the top one that was worn more, on some, it was the bottom one. Some brushes were down to loose wire.


On the attached photo, you can see the extent of the uneven wear for one pair.


We recently had the boatyard change the bowthruster oil and they drained it all before adding new oil, which resulted in challenges getting all the air out of the system. We then completed a 1350 mile passage. These probably have nothing to do with it, but maybe I'm wrong.


Before I go out and spend money to replace the brushes and possibly experience similar uneven wear, anyone have any ideas as to why this happened and how to rectify it?


Thanks!


Scott

A54 #69 

S/V Tengah 



 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: rig tuning

greatketch@...
 

Ryan,

Some thoughts.  

I have never been able to tune a rig accurately “by ear”.  I always use a loos tension gauge, or the stretch method with the meter stick.  But... that only gets you so far.  

Taking the boat out sailing in a good breeze is a very important part of the process.  Skipping that step, out of economic requirements, is why so many “Professional” riggers come up short in tuning rigs, and not just Amels. 

Olivier has written an excellent summary on tuning that is here in the archives.  The is no reason you can’t slack all the rigging and start as if your mast was newly stepped.  

If your back stay was too loose, then your forestay must be too, assuming the mast is straight, since they pull in opposition to each other.

Bill Kinney
Sm160, Harmonie
Norfolk, VA, USA


Re: Wood trim around Vee berth windows

karkauai
 

Here I am again, still trying to get the wood trim around the portlights off. I was able to remove the ones in the VeeBerth using a putty knife, hammer, screw drivers, filet knife, and flat pry bar. It’s a difficult job. All the bolts and screws holding the outside metal trim on have to be removed. That’s the easy part. There is a LOT of adhesive holding the wood panel to the cabin side above and below the windows.

Now I’m working in the saloon and after 3 hours have only gotten one panel about 1/4 freed.

Anyone have any ideas how to get these panels off? I think the adhesive is silicone sealant. Is there anything that could be dripped down between the wood and the cabin side(it’s adhered to the headliner material) that would soften the silicone?
Any other ideas?

Thanks,
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] melted muffler

Sv Garulfo
 

Robin, 
Another source of air leak is the seachest screwed cover. It may be mis-threaded, and the engine sucks air in. The seachest does not leak out sea water because the fridge circulation pump is enough to depressurise it...

As a tell tale on the 54, the stream of water overflowing out of the engine gooseneck into the cockpit scupper (companionway side) should be continuous once the initial startup coughs have gone. No noticeable exhaust smells from there. 

Hope that helps

Thomas
GARULFO
AMEL 54 #122
Bonaire


On Mon, 28 May 2018 at 10:25, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill - I think this is his propulsion engine, not genset.

Robin - any updates on what you've found?

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dome light in aft lazarette needs replacing

 

Derick,

You need to ask the person who installed it after your boat was made.😀

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, May 28, 2018 at 3:03 PM, derickgates@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,


After five years of ownership, I just discovered that the aft lazarette has a dome light. How did I find it? I was cleaning out the lazarette at night and noticed a light was on.  Having discovered the dome light, I went to switch it off.  Instead, it just dimmed to about 1/3 the intensity.  I tapped on the dome a little too hard, and found that the glass of the dome was now in 3 pieces, but the light still would not turn off.  Switching off the aft lights on the 24 volt panel did cut the power to the dome light, but otherwise it looks like the switch in the dome light is faulty and needs replacing.


Does anyone know where to get these dome light fixtures?  


Derick Gates

SM2K#400

Brava

Currently on the hard in Antigua for hurricane season


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bow Thruster Rusted Shut

 

I am here

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, May 28, 2018 at 12:20 PM, Dennis Johns sbmesasailor@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I'm a little surprised that Bill R. hasn't checked in on this one yet.  PB Blaster is good but Corrosion X is the new leader in releasing rusted parts.  Bill turned me on to it about two years ago and I don't use anything else now for releasing rusted parts.  You do need to let it work, apply and then wait a few hours or even overnight.

Dennis Johns
Libertad
Maramu #121


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: A54 Sleipner bowthruster uneven brush wear

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi Scott,

Talking of the devil...

I haven't looked into the carbon dust and brushes yet, cause I reconnected the thruster for a quick stop in a marina and after the initial 'all-good' tests, it decided to only thrust to port and not starboard....
So I've got a second issue to troubleshoot. If anyone has experienced it and has clues, it's very welcome. 

I'll check the state of the brushes for uneven wear too, to give you another data point. 
Note that i don't have an oil reservoir in my unit.


Fair winds to all,

Thomas
GARULFO
AMEL 54 #122
Bonaire 


On Mon, 28 May 2018 at 05:54, cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Craig,


Answers to your questions below:

1) After we let it cool down (~30 minutes) it ran fine. Perhaps a bit weaker but that's probably to be expected considering that some of the brushes have worn down considerably and actually even cracked, exposing just bare conductors. My fear is that going forward, it will continue to overheat prematurely and leave us without a bow thruster when we most need it.

2) The sidepower bowthruster has a drain plug underwater between the two props and a fill reservoir in the bow locker. Obviously oil is changed on the hard. My understanding is that the way to change the oil is to open the plug and continue filling the reservoir until the oil coming out of the plug looks clean. That way, you don't get air into the system.

The mechanic drained all of the oil and he put the plug back and filled the reservoir. The next day, the oil level had dropped, indicating that the air migrated upwards (and/or the thick oil slowly migrated downwards). This drop in oil level continued for a few days. It seems reasonably stable now, but I'm unsure whether some air was still stuck in the gearleg and never made its way out.

Also, we now have a strong "Mass -" leak. Thomas of S/V Garulfo posted that he had a bow thruster leak, possibly from carbon dust. I'll go check that now and report back.

But in general, any idea why the carbon brushes would be wearing so unevenly?


Scott

A54 #69 

S/V Tengah 




---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :




Hi Scott,

Your post raises a couple of questions. 
1. You say the unit had a thermal shutdown - did it work after it cooled  down?  Any problems?
2. In what way did the mechanic have trouble getting air out of the system? On the SN and SM one simply turns the bottom section upside down to drain and then pours in new oil. No issue with air. Perhaps the 54 is a different design that I'm not familiar with.

Craig


---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote :

Hi all,


I was coming into the quay at Zante yesterday in our A54 with about 10-15 knots on the beam and used the sidepower bow thruster in 10-15 second bursts and all of the sudden, thermal shutdown!


After executing an exciting no thruster stern-to med mooring into a tight spot (with expectant spectators!) I opened up the bow thruster compartment to see a lot of carbon dust. I took the motor cover off and inspected the brushes and found that for each of the pairs (4 pairs, 8 total brushes), one was worn MUCH more than the other one. On some pairs, it's the top one that was worn more, on some, it was the bottom one. Some brushes were down to loose wire.


On the attached photo, you can see the extent of the uneven wear for one pair.


We recently had the boatyard change the bowthruster oil and they drained it all before adding new oil, which resulted in challenges getting all the air out of the system. We then completed a 1350 mile passage. These probably have nothing to do with it, but maybe I'm wrong.


Before I go out and spend money to replace the brushes and possibly experience similar uneven wear, anyone have any ideas as to why this happened and how to rectify it?


Thanks!


Scott

A54 #69 

S/V Tengah 



 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi David. What I enjoyed most reading your story was how you progressively discovered the supreme sailing abilities of the sm, how forgiving it is. Its willingness to accept the skippers desperate call for a crash gybe touching no sail controls. You were so right using the preventers. There are many boats out there that would have refused that gybe with the t bone following. I also salute your recognition of the need for open watch keepers eyes at all times. 

When I replied to your previous what I tried to impart is what a powerful, sea kindly,fast, forgiving and supreme off shore yacht he SM is. You are now discovering that for your self.  She will always do what you ask, give a little shake, and say: ok boss, what's next. There are not many boats out there that come any where near her. In my opinion don't tie her hands behind her back and hobble her with stuff dragged behind.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean pearl

On 29 May 2018 at 08:04 "dbv_au@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Christian, Ian, Bill (K), Kent, Danny,

Firstly, belated thanks to you for all your input.  The delay in my reply is due, in part, to the fact that I was putting it all into practice.  Two legs, St Maarten to Antigua, and then Antigua to Martinique.

We are currently spending time in AMEL CENTRAL, MQ, for programmed repairs and maintenance.

We encountered boisterous conditions for both legs, no sustained down-wind sailing, mostly beam reaches and on-the-nose.  Winds to 28 sustained (apparent), with gusts to 35 in squalls.

The summary for the sail-trim: no need to slow down using anything but reefing up to 45 knots AWS.  I have not yet experienced anything above 45 knots, so trailing warps, chains, tyres, or the JSD will wait for another time or rather, hopefully, not!

Did do a little going downwind, and the wing-on-wing-on-wing works great out to 155º apparent, winds up to 25 knots, moderate seas.  The genoa fully out on the ‘correct’ side, dragging us downwind; the main being set on the windward side to balance, and strongly prevented; the mizzen following the genoa (and still prevented, of course).

For beam reaches and upwind, the amount of sail was set to obtain an average angle of heel of 15º - on the basis of my understanding that this amount of heel delivers the longest LWL (and hence STW).  Sails were trimmed for maximum boat-speed. This worked well, easily exceeding 8 knots STW in anything above 20 knots apparent wind speed.  When the wind picked up and there was a need to reef, sail was reduced as required to achieve a 15º angle of heel.  This kept the ride comfortable and fast, and the first mate happy.

We were at times pointing into the seas.  As Danny wrote, and I can confirm, that our SMs will quite willingly go “wave hopping” at 8 knots.  All that awful crashing and banging, quite unsettling.

So, from these short inter-island hops across and into brisk winds and confused seas, another rule-of-thumb:  slow down when the seas are “short and sharp”, especially when the wind is forward of the beam.

What is “short and sharp”?  My observation is that, when we are sailing upwind in winds of greater than 20 knots, and carrying best sail for that magical (mythical) 15º angle-of-heel, PERIGEE considers the seas to be ‘short and sharp’ whenever the period (in seconds) is less than the height (in feet).

How much to slow down? Can’t really say, but whatever it takes to avoid PERIGEE trying to launch herself heaven-wards through or over the waves.  I guess it depends somewhat on the direction of the seas. I also tried bearing off, but when the wind and wave-trains are not aligned, this might not work.  And in any case it then becomes the usual trade-off between VMG to WPT/Destination.  I didn’t get esoteric enough to look into the detail of the leeway trade-off when pointing up, but did get the feel that when heading anything closer than ~45º (apparent) to the wind, the boat slowed down whilst leeway increased, so we drifted sideways; so, the better option was to go faster at 50º off the apparent wind.  Danny mentioned that the wide keel (or, maybe it’s low aspect ratio, depth/fore-aft chord ), makes the keel stall quite readily.  I’m not sure how this all works, so I would definitely be interested to hear what others know, or think, is the case here.  What is that magic figure for ‘on the wind’?

BTW, we have happily and comfortably endured squalls (beam-reaching with all three sails up and heavily, but not deeply, reefed and trimmed as per above, 15º heel) with gusts to 45 knots (apparent), with only a moderate increase in heel.  Biggest sustained conditions experienced thus far: 6-7m seas in 35-42kt sustained winds, beam-reaching - only moderately reefed, as I hadn’t yet learnt about 15º heel and the SM design LWL etc at that stage, so looking back I was really quite over-powered, but it was still a very comfortable (and controllable) ride.

On a closing note, one interesting event was a ‘crash-gybe’ one night, whilst reaching in a squall.  This was to avoid crossing traffic (sail boat, but with no sails, or normal nav lights) which was sighted almost too late due to reduced visibility in the squall, combined with heads-down on the radar due to squall avoidance.  No damage done, as we were in standard offshore mode which is, even when on-the-wind, to have the main set with double preventers (one each port & starboard), and the sheet+preventer combination on the mizzen trimmed to minimise movement of the boom.  The genoa was reefed to the forward shrouds; this is now our SoP for upwind work in squally conditions at night. Never thought I’d NEED to use this arrangement, which was intended to minimise the consequences of an unintentional gybe (perhaps an A/P disconnect whilst below - I guess it happens).  But when I needed to put the helm down, powered up at going at 8 knots, with less than 3 boat-lengths to loud crunching noises, it worked a treat.  I must admit it did feel a little strange, and a bit disorienting, as I’d not tried a power gybe and then heave-to at night before.

The other vessel was not showing normal nav lights, only an anchor light - there was no response to horn or spot-light, even coming close on the second pass.  So, it seems possible that the other vessel was un-manned.  There was one vessel reported missing we later heard, having drifted off the shelf of an upwind island a day or so previously.  This was even with two anchors set.  The vessel signature on radar was obscured in heavy rain, and the anchor light blended rather nicely into the background island lights until almost too late.  No moon.  We could see the ghostly shape of the hull (no sails) only once we got close enough for the reflection of our nav lights - now, that really is too close, I can assure you.  It is my opinion that, in the absence of avoiding action, we would have T-boned this guy at 8 knots.  Gotta keep those eyes up and out of the cockpit.

And why is it that these things seem to happen between 2 and 4am, when the skipper is off-watch and asleep below.  Anyway . . .

... fair winds,

David
SV Perigee
On Dock #4, le Marin,
Martinique


 


 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] melted muffler

robin hutter
 

put a new impeller pump in today as well as an alarm on the exhaust muffler and keep my finger crossed that the problem has gine away - everything else was checked thouroughly and found to be okay ...

If you don‘t hear from me again in this regard, that was the solution...

fair winds

Robin
Amel 54 #54 - Carré d‘As


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

SV Perigee
 

Christian, Ian, Bill (K), Kent, Danny,

Firstly, belated thanks to you for all your input.  The delay in my reply is due, in part, to the fact that I was putting it all into practice.  Two legs, St Maarten to Antigua, and then Antigua to Martinique.

We are currently spending time in AMEL CENTRAL, MQ, for programmed repairs and maintenance.

We encountered boisterous conditions for both legs, no sustained down-wind sailing, mostly beam reaches and on-the-nose.  Winds to 28 sustained (apparent), with gusts to 35 in squalls.

The summary for the sail-trim: no need to slow down using anything but reefing up to 45 knots AWS.  I have not yet experienced anything above 45 knots, so trailing warps, chains, tyres, or the JSD will wait for another time or rather, hopefully, not!

Did do a little going downwind, and the wing-on-wing-on-wing works great out to 155º apparent, winds up to 25 knots, moderate seas.  The genoa fully out on the ‘correct’ side, dragging us downwind; the main being set on the windward side to balance, and strongly prevented; the mizzen following the genoa (and still prevented, of course).

For beam reaches and upwind, the amount of sail was set to obtain an average angle of heel of 15º - on the basis of my understanding that this amount of heel delivers the longest LWL (and hence STW).  Sails were trimmed for maximum boat-speed. This worked well, easily exceeding 8 knots STW in anything above 20 knots apparent wind speed.  When the wind picked up and there was a need to reef, sail was reduced as required to achieve a 15º angle of heel.  This kept the ride comfortable and fast, and the first mate happy.

We were at times pointing into the seas.  As Danny wrote, and I can confirm, that our SMs will quite willingly go “wave hopping” at 8 knots.  All that awful crashing and banging, quite unsettling.

So, from these short inter-island hops across and into brisk winds and confused seas, another rule-of-thumb:  slow down when the seas are “short and sharp”, especially when the wind is forward of the beam.

What is “short and sharp”?  My observation is that, when we are sailing upwind in winds of greater than 20 knots, and carrying best sail for that magical (mythical) 15º angle-of-heel, PERIGEE considers the seas to be ‘short and sharp’ whenever the period (in seconds) is less than the height (in feet).

How much to slow down? Can’t really say, but whatever it takes to avoid PERIGEE trying to launch herself heaven-wards through or over the waves.  I guess it depends somewhat on the direction of the seas. I also tried bearing off, but when the wind and wave-trains are not aligned, this might not work.  And in any case it then becomes the usual trade-off between VMG to WPT/Destination.  I didn’t get esoteric enough to look into the detail of the leeway trade-off when pointing up, but did get the feel that when heading anything closer than ~45º (apparent) to the wind, the boat slowed down whilst leeway increased, so we drifted sideways; so, the better option was to go faster at 50º off the apparent wind.  Danny mentioned that the wide keel (or, maybe it’s low aspect ratio, depth/fore-aft chord ), makes the keel stall quite readily.  I’m not sure how this all works, so I would definitely be interested to hear what others know, or think, is the case here.  What is that magic figure for ‘on the wind’?

BTW, we have happily and comfortably endured squalls (beam-reaching with all three sails up and heavily, but not deeply, reefed and trimmed as per above, 15º heel) with gusts to 45 knots (apparent), with only a moderate increase in heel.  Biggest sustained conditions experienced thus far: 6-7m seas in 35-42kt sustained winds, beam-reaching - only moderately reefed, as I hadn’t yet learnt about 15º heel and the SM design LWL etc at that stage, so looking back I was really quite over-powered, but it was still a very comfortable (and controllable) ride.

On a closing note, one interesting event was a ‘crash-gybe’ one night, whilst reaching in a squall.  This was to avoid crossing traffic (sail boat, but with no sails, or normal nav lights) which was sighted almost too late due to reduced visibility in the squall, combined with heads-down on the radar due to squall avoidance.  No damage done, as we were in standard offshore mode which is, even when on-the-wind, to have the main set with double preventers (one each port & starboard), and the sheet+preventer combination on the mizzen trimmed to minimise movement of the boom.  The genoa was reefed to the forward shrouds; this is now our SoP for upwind work in squally conditions at night. Never thought I’d NEED to use this arrangement, which was intended to minimise the consequences of an unintentional gybe (perhaps an A/P disconnect whilst below - I guess it happens).  But when I needed to put the helm down, powered up at going at 8 knots, with less than 3 boat-lengths to loud crunching noises, it worked a treat.  I must admit it did feel a little strange, and a bit disorienting, as I’d not tried a power gybe and then heave-to at night before.

The other vessel was not showing normal nav lights, only an anchor light - there was no response to horn or spot-light, even coming close on the second pass.  So, it seems possible that the other vessel was un-manned.  There was one vessel reported missing we later heard, having drifted off the shelf of an upwind island a day or so previously.  This was even with two anchors set.  The vessel signature on radar was obscured in heavy rain, and the anchor light blended rather nicely into the background island lights until almost too late.  No moon.  We could see the ghostly shape of the hull (no sails) only once we got close enough for the reflection of our nav lights - now, that really is too close, I can assure you.  It is my opinion that, in the absence of avoiding action, we would have T-boned this guy at 8 knots.  Gotta keep those eyes up and out of the cockpit.

And why is it that these things seem to happen between 2 and 4am, when the skipper is off-watch and asleep below.  Anyway . . .

... fair winds,

David
SV Perigee
On Dock #4, le Marin,
Martinique

Dome light in aft lazarette needs replacing

Derick Gates
 

Hi all,


After five years of ownership, I just discovered that the aft lazarette has a dome light. How did I find it? I was cleaning out the lazarette at night and noticed a light was on.  Having discovered the dome light, I went to switch it off.  Instead, it just dimmed to about 1/3 the intensity.  I tapped on the dome a little too hard, and found that the glass of the dome was now in 3 pieces, but the light still would not turn off.  Switching off the aft lights on the 24 volt panel did cut the power to the dome light, but otherwise it looks like the switch in the dome light is faulty and needs replacing.


Does anyone know where to get these dome light fixtures?  


Derick Gates

SM2K#400

Brava

Currently on the hard in Antigua for hurricane season

Re: Bow Thruster Rusted Shut

sbmesasailor
 

I'm a little surprised that Bill R. hasn't checked in on this one yet.  PB Blaster is good but Corrosion X is the new leader in releasing rusted parts.  Bill turned me on to it about two years ago and I don't use anything else now for releasing rusted parts.  You do need to let it work, apply and then wait a few hours or even overnight.

Dennis Johns
Libertad
Maramu #121