Date   

Re: Question about the refrigiration system on an A54

Arno Luijten
 

So, for those interested:
I looked it up on the Interweb and is seems Frigoboat (actual company name is  Veco S.p.A.) has this system where they use a special developed circulation pump designed to run 24/7. Apparently they did not want to develop a 24 volt version so they only have a 12 volt version. To accommodate a 24 volt ship's system they have some devices (like the pump switch) to lower the voltage from 24 to 12 volt. The compressor and such still runs on 24 volt as this is the standard Danfoss system that can accept both 12 and 24 volt.
So the switch (http://www.penguinfrigo.co.uk/shop/product/581/) itself converts the 24 volt into 12 volt to supply the pump.

The tricky part is that this pump has a fairly low consumption (1Amp. @ 12 Volt) and this pump should not be replaced by just any other pump, given it's duty cycle and noise level.
I'm actually wondering if this is not just a 24 volt pump set to rum at 12 volt to make it last longer and more quiet.
Amel 54's come equipped with a spare pump right next to the active one. There is a reason for this.

Arno


Re: Amel 54 main mast seal

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Barry and Penny,

Our A54 had the same problem as did another A54 we know of. Both were replaced in Martinique by the Amel service point in Le Marin. They use a hydraulic jack to lift the mast slightly after loosening the stays. Once they have lifted it a few centimeters they remove the remains of the old compression disc and insert a new one (made from a different material).
I'm not sure if this will help you given your location, but I'm sure the do the same exercise in La Rochelle, France. Maybe they can provide you with additional guidance on how to proceed and supply you with a new disc.

Regards,

Arno

Luna, A54


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 54 main mast seal

Peter Forbes
 

Dear Barry and Penny,

We had the same issue on our 54 #035 and so I showed Olivier Beaute and he said that the edges had broken off but the main seal was intact and if I wanted to replace it I would have to lift the mast with a crane. We decided to do nothing at the moment.

Peter
Peter Forbes
0044 7836 209730
Carango  Sailing Ketch
Amel 54 #035
In La Rochelle for sale

On 5 Aug 2018, at 09:08, connor_barry@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Can anyone in the group advise me on the procedure to replace the bottom main mast seal.

The seal at the bottom of the mast on the deck is cracking and pieces are breaking off around the edge of the mast base.

This is not happening at the bottom of the mizzen mast. 

I am thinking that the mast might need to be lifted up and a new seal put in. Hoping that this is not the repair remedy and that there might be some simpler method to repair this.

Is this a common problem and part of maintenance?

Our Amel 54 is now 12 years young.


Many Thanks


Regards


Barry and Penny

S/V Lady Penelope II

Amel 54. #17

Sailing Croatia




Amel 54 main mast seal

Barry Connor
 

Can anyone in the group advise me on the procedure to replace the bottom main mast seal.

The seal at the bottom of the mast on the deck is cracking and pieces are breaking off around the edge of the mast base.

This is not happening at the bottom of the mizzen mast. 

I am thinking that the mast might need to be lifted up and a new seal put in. Hoping that this is not the repair remedy and that there might be some simpler method to repair this.

Is this a common problem and part of maintenance?

Our Amel 54 is now 12 years young.


Many Thanks


Regards


Barry and Penny

S/V Lady Penelope II

Amel 54. #17

Sailing Croatia


Re: Question about the refrigiration system on an A54

John Clark
 

Hi Arno,
Just a guess on my part, but some equipment can accept a variety of input voltage/frequency and rely upon an internal converter to provide the load with correct power. Case in point is the new compressor I just installed for the salon frig-freezer. It can utilize 12 to 36 volts DC as input and provide the motor with variable frequency A.C. at a higher voltage. All internal.

Regards John

SV Annie SM 37
Le Marin


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Question about the refrigiration system on an A54

 

Arno,

Long story. 

It is better for you to Google that part number. BTW, that part is no longer available. 

If you need more, email me at Bill"at"amelschool.com.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Sat, Aug 4, 2018, 18:28 arno.luijten@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Digging deeper and deeper in the engine bay, I found something I don’t really understand. Maybe the esteemed members of the forum can enlighten me.

The refrigiration system has a electronic box that senses if any of the fridge-compressors is running. If so it activates the sea-water pump to push cooling water through the systems. Now this box indicates 12 or 24 volts and the 24 volt LED lights up. So far so good. Now why are the actual pumps (main and spare) 12 volt? And where is the converter that supplies the 12 volt for the pump?

Thank you all for taking the effort to read my query!

Arno Luijten

Luna, A54


Question about the refrigiration system on an A54

Arno Luijten
 

Digging deeper and deeper in the engine bay, I found something I don’t really understand. Maybe the esteemed members of the forum can enlighten me.

The refrigiration system has a electronic box that senses if any of the fridge-compressors is running. If so it activates the sea-water pump to push cooling water through the systems. Now this box indicates 12 or 24 volts and the 24 volt LED lights up. So far so good. Now why are the actual pumps (main and spare) 12 volt? And where is the converter that supplies the 12 volt for the pump?

Thank you all for taking the effort to read my query!

Arno Luijten

Luna, A54


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Thomson Australe Clothes Washer Questions

Mark Erdos
 

Kent,

 

Here is a link to the correct size belt: https://www.espares.co.uk/product/es1741942/compatible-washing-machine-poly-vee-drive-bel Espares ships internationally at very reasonable rates.

 

The reason your belt broke is because the drum is ceased. The most probable cause for this is the drum bearing being frozen. Perhaps the unit hasn’t been used in a while. It is an easy fix. Open the washer from the top. Open the inner drum (hopefully it is stuck so you can access the inside). When facing the washer (with your back to the nav-station) you will see a perforated cover held on with 4 screws on the right side of the drum. Remove this cover. Vacuum out any soap crud. Use a penetrating oil and spay the bearing in this area. It is hard to see the bearing but if you spray in enough oil it will find its way. The drum will work free if you rock it back and forth. Let the oil do its job. If you can let it sit overnight, even better. Once the drum is free, keep spinning it by hand. Without the belt you should be able to give it a good amount of oomph and it will spin a few revolutions before stopping. Install the new belt. Cycle the washer at least once without cloths to remove the remnants of the oil.

 

In future, you can prevent the belt from breaking if you ensure the drum is turning freely when you put in the laundry.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, August 4, 2018 12:53 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Thomson Australe Clothes Washer Questions

 

 

Hi all,

I hope everyone is having a great summer (or winter as the case may be),

 

The belt on my Thomson Australe broke.  I found a replacement which appears to be identical to the one tha broke, but when I try to install the new belt, I'm lacking a good 30mm or so to get it on.  To make matters more difficult, the drum is locked, and I can't figure out how to get it unlocked so I can (hopefully) turn the drum while I try to install the new belt.

 

I'm sure someone else has done this, can you tell me how you got the new belt on?

 

Thanks in advance.

Kent

SM 243

Kristy

Currently at Yacht Maintenance in Cambridge, MD USA, pulling masts and booms for painting, replacing all running rigging, repairing sails, adding reclining loveseat where settee and pullout sea berth are removed, adding tool chest to forward hanging locker, adding drawer under companionway ladder, rebedding cabintop hatches, replacing/raising cockpit cover and enclosure.......


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

Stephen Davis
 

Hello Barry and Penny,

Liz and I would be happy to sponsor you for OCC membership. If you would send me a message to my personal email at flyboyscd at google dot com, I’ll send you a link to get you started. 

Aloha,

Steve and Liz Davis
S/V Aloha

Steve Davis
S/V Aloha

On Aug 4, 2018, at 12:35 AM, Barry Connor connor_barry@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello Steve and Liz,

Saw that you are OCC Hawaii Port Officers..
We would like to join the OCC, would you sponsor us?
The AMEL group is a wealth of information but feel the OCC would also help with our travels.
I completed an Atlantic crossing in 1999. We have owned our 54 for 3 years and are currently on what I call our shakedown cruise this summer in The Adriatic before heading off next year on our round the world. I would like to visit Hawaii again but on our boat, I lived in Hawaii for 4 years (1970-1074).
Look forward to hearing back.
Best Regards

Barry and Penny Connor
Amel 54.  #17
“Lady Penelope II”
Sailing Croatia


On Aug 3, 2018, at 20:46, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Mark,

Liz and I have been members of the OCC for about a year and a half. We are also the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and have enjoyed helping some other members with some logistics for planning a trip to Hawaii. We found the Port Officer for the Caribbean side of Panama to be a big help when we transited Panama. OCC has Port Officers In most of the world you plan on visiting, and I think you will find them a useful resource. Bottom line is that we feel membership is well worth the meager cost. 

Let me know if you need any more info, or if we can be off assistance if you decide to join. 

Aloha,

Steve and Liz
OCC Hawaii Port Officers
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii

On Aug 3, 2018, at 07:27, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Ian,

 

Thank you so much for the feedback.

 

Cindy will say I need no encouragement to go and knock on another boat (Amel or otherwise)... I am that pest in the anchorage who will introduce himself.

 

Do you think the OCC group will be of use beyond the Panama canal and west?

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 3, 2018 9:40 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Hi  Mark,

 

 We have been members since our qualifying trip in 1981.  The OCC is a virtual club in the sense that it doesn't have a clubhouse and its 2000 odd members  ( maybe more now) are scattered across the globe. It produces a newsletter every 6 months or so and a 200 odd page journal twice a year with cruising stories from members.

 

 The choice of 1,000 miles between points is obviously an arbitrary one, as is the size of the boat, but they were chosen by the originator of the club over 50 years ago and have served well. It puts the O in OCC.

 

 You will now find port officers in most countries,  a voluntary role often filled by someone who has swallowed the hook but still wants to be involved in the cruising world. We have used them to good effect in finding stores, reliable technicians etc in new ports.

 

 Like any club member, when you see an OCC burgee in an anchorage it's irresistible to meet them for a beer and in contrast to almost every other  club they might come from one of 20 or more different countries.

 

I am sorry that the rules suggested to you  that the OCC is bureaucratic---it's very far from that. Amongst its members you will find some of the most adventurous and free spirited folk afloat, some of whose whose achievements will amaze  you.   Rallies where boats sail together  are a rare feature in the club. Normally an OCC rally has meant meeting in an anchorage for a drink, rather than a cruise in company. I suspect that a significant majority of OCC members prefer to do  their own thing , occasionally meeting to share their experiences.

 

 Sharing experiences is what the OCC is all about. There is a small  number of dinners or BBQ's or whatever held  each year in different countries, particularly but not only the UK and US East coast, but I suspect that most members only ever meet other members in a cockpit somewhere. On one extraordinary day we were one of 4 OCC boats who met in Caleta Beaulieu in the Beagle Channel. We all knew each other but it was pure chance that we all happened to be close by  at the same time. 

 

  Arguably,  OCC membership really comes into its own not in the Med or Caribbean , which are socially crowded places, but in some far flung anchorage  where you least expect to see another boat , but there is  yacht with an OCC burgee at her port spreaders.  You make friends for life like that--just as you would if you came across another Amel in such circumstances.

 

 Fair winds,

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 03 August 2018 12:33:46
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Steve,

 

Interesting to see you are OCC Port Officers.

 

A couple of months ago I looked into joining the OCC but really struggled to see the value. The forum seem light and I assumed it was because of lack of members. Some of the subjects hadn’t been posted in since last year.

 

I had a hard time with the qualifications that sort of appeared a bit snobby to me such as “must have completed a non-stop ocean passage between two ports, where the distance between the ports is not less than 1,000 nautical miles measured by the shortest practical Great Circle route, as skipper or member of the crew in a vessel of not more than 70ft (21.3 m) LOA I scratched my head and wondered why you couldn’t join if you had done a 999 mile passage on a 71’ yacht J  - or - An Associate Member must have made a clear commitment to achieve the qualifying passage in a realistic and reasonable time-scale. The time allowed is at the discretion of the General Committee and shall take account of all the circumstances of each individual applicant, but it shall not normally exceed three years. Anyway this really sort of put me off.

 

We reconsidered joining when we looked at joining the Suzie Too OCC rally. But our golden rule of sailing on our own schedule prevented us from doing so.. We are heading in the same direction as the Suzie Too but will not go as far north of Panama.

 

Sorry for the long-winded note but I am wondering if you have found the membership beneficial and to what extent do you use it? Any other OCC members, please chime in.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

 

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken teeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect.

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage... When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction.

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement of all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion.. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end pieces from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them.

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendation is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together.

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing.

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Unknown spare parts [1 Attachment]

ya_fohi
 

Thanks Danny. I guess the same would apply to the 54?

Cheers,
Paul


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Thomson Australe Clothes Washer Questions

 

Kent,

I have done this job. If you have the right size belt it is a tight, but doable job...start it on the drum pulley, then turn the drum to complete the fit.

However, you say the drum is locked. That is probably the reason the belt has thrown. You need to look for the reason it is locked. I could be a frozen motor, drum bearing, or maybe something else. 

That washer is a European sized home washer. It is a small footprint, but standard size, produced in Europe by several manufacturers. The standard size is 85X40X60cm HxWxD. I am guessing that your is 20+ years old. Ask yourself how long home washers normally last. I think you will determine that you need a replacement. The last time I checked there were replacements in Martinique and Guadalupe for about 400-650 euros. 

I think anyone owning a SM with Martinique or Guadalupe (possibly St Martin) in their plans should consider replacing a washer in a SM. The youngest washer aboard any SM has to be at least 13-14 years old...think about it.

Otherwise, you will have to hire an agent in Europe or Martinique to purchase one and have it air-freighted to where you are. Here is an advertisement I cut out in Barcelona.


Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be taken when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any referred to mechanical and/or electrical device or system.


On Sat, Aug 4, 2018 at 11:53 AM karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,
I hope everyone is having a great summer (or winter as the case may be),

The belt on my Thomson Australe broke.  I found a replacement which appears to be identical to the one tha broke, but when I try to install the new belt, I'm lacking a good 30mm or so to get it on.  To make matters more difficult, the drum is locked, and I can't figure out how to get it unlocked so I can (hopefully) turn the drum while I try to install the new belt.

I'm sure someone else has done this, can you tell me how you got the new belt on?

Thanks in advance.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy
Currently at Yacht Maintenance in Cambridge, MD USA, pulling masts and booms for painting, replacing all running rigging, repairing sails, adding reclining loveseat where settee and pullout sea berth are removed, adding tool chest to forward hanging locker, adding dr awer under companionway ladder, rebedding cabintop hatches, replacing/raising cockpit cover and enclosure.......


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] espar heater

James Cromie
 

Ryan and Kelly - thank you for the feedback.  I will hopefully get it installed fairly soon.  

Fair Winds,
James

On Aug 3, 2018, at 1:43 PM, Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi James,

I had an Espar D5 Airtronic on my previous boat, a Gulfstar 37.  I lived aboard with that heater through 7 Boston winters.  It's a really great heater.  I had it installed by Ocean Options in Tiverton, RI, which should be very close to you.  They do excellent work, and you're going to want to get to know them even if you don't use them for the installation because they are the local repair and parts source.

These heaters can be somewhat finicky when it comes to their fuel and air supplies.  The fuel pump should be calibrated with your specific heater, something that I think you'll have to get Ocean Options to do.  I also had a problem with my heater coking up a lot which was eventually resolved by lengthening the air intake hose, thus providing a more stable flow of air... not something I would have thought to try, but the Ocean Options guys figured it out.  Also, their usual installation draws air from inside the boat for combustion, which creates negative pressure inside the cabin and thus draws in a little fresh air from outside.  I think this is significant for keeping the boat dry in the winter.

Expect a blower motor to last about 3-4 winters if you're living aboard full time and leave it running (I'd turn it down to the lowest setting when leaving for work in the morning, but leave it running so the pipes don't freeze).  You'll want to get it professionally cleaned every summer.  Even with the cleaning, you may find the glow plug and fuel screen coke up over the course of a winter and you need to replace it yourself -- get spares.  It runs a lot cleaner with kerosene than diesel.  On my old boat, I'd bring kerosene in jerry cans and dump them into the main fuel tank all winter, then in spring switch back to diesel so by the time I was ready to start the engine, there wasn't any kerosene left in the system.  On an Amel, I think you might not want to do that... the tank is much larger and you may actually want to operate the generator during the winter if the power goes out.  The tank might even be big enough to last you all winter long without refueling!  I burned about a gallon per day averaged over the winter.  The Amel, being significantly larger, may take more fuel.  Really, the D5 seems like it's too small for this boat, but it's what Amel chose.  Perhaps they didn't have full time New England liveaboard use in mind when they designed the system.  You want the heater to be big enough that it spends most of its time on "low".

Last winter, I heated my (new to me) Amel with the built-in electric heat supplemented with two space heaters.  It was quite comfortable, even on the coldest days.  I did have to take care not to exceed the power rating of the shore power cord.

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 2:59 AM jamescromie@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I am writing the group to ask for advice regarding installation of an Espar diesel heater which I plan to install on my Amel Super Maramu, hull #347.  I have acquired the various components, along with a D5 24V Diesel Espar heater.  


Though the heater comes with an installation kit including insulated exhaust tubing and hull fitting, I note that Amel installed heaters have a rigid stainless steel exhaust tube and associated fiberglass exhaust shroud.  

I have inquired of Amel in La Rochelle, and they no longer carry these parts, nor did they have a drawing of the shroud.  

I'd like to as the following of the group:

-Do any of you have tips / advice on installing the heater?
-Any recommendations for installation experts in New England or Annapolis area?
   (I have already reached out to Peter of Helm Yacht on Long Island)
-What was used for the exhaust fittings?
-Did you do the installation yourself? 
-Any other advice on the use or care / maintenance of the heater system?

Thank you so much for your input!

James
SV Soteria
Amel SM2K, Portsmouth, RI




Thomson Australe Clothes Washer Questions

karkauai
 

Hi all,
I hope everyone is having a great summer (or winter as the case may be),

The belt on my Thomson Australe broke.  I found a replacement which appears to be identical to the one tha broke, but when I try to install the new belt, I'm lacking a good 30mm or so to get it on.  To make matters more difficult, the drum is locked, and I can't figure out how to get it unlocked so I can (hopefully) turn the drum while I try to install the new belt.

I'm sure someone else has done this, can you tell me how you got the new belt on?

Thanks in advance.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy
Currently at Yacht Maintenance in Cambridge, MD USA, pulling masts and booms for painting, replacing all running rigging, repairing sails, adding reclining loveseat where settee and pullout sea berth are removed, adding tool chest to forward hanging locker, adding drawer under companionway ladder, rebedding cabintop hatches, replacing/raising cockpit cover and enclosure.......


Mainsail for Maramu

Miles
 


Through a sequence of unusual events, I am in possession of a new Maramu Mainsail by Q Sails.  The sail is still in the box.  It is of Hydanet cloth, tri-radial with spectra webbing.  It is for sale for $2860.   If you are not familiar with Q Sail, see the postings by Bill Rouse.   They use the Amel plans and build lovely sails.  I have them on my boat.

I can be reached at my email, milesbid at gmail dot com.


Miles

S/Y Ladybug, sm 216, Newport, RI



Re: Genoa for a Sharki

carcodespam@...
 

Hi Greg,

I would like to take your old genoa. I have a Sharki #60 from 1982 and I am currently in Marina Kalamata. If your genoa is still worth the effort to hire a car to come to Cleopatra Marina I will come next week to take it.
My email is carcode at me dot com
Please write me what you think.

Gerhard
Sharki #60
Marina Kalamatra


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

Craig Briggs
 

We'll second the kudos for OCC.  And for US east coasters, Gary Naigle and Greta Gustafson, Port Officers in Norfolk are the best, with slips in downtown and a constant gathering of world cruisers. Several spots along the Chesapeake, too. 
Craig and Katherine Briggs, SN68, Sangaris


Re: Elongated hole on conical coupling

Craig Briggs
 

Hii Alan,
I wonder if that might be normal-ish compression of the rubber shocks inside the Vetus. Frankly doesn't sound like a big deal and I should think the Nylocs would be ok without Loctite. The problem ones I've seen (and had) were really loose - like rattling around. Will be interesting to see how they are when next you inspect them.
Cheers, Craig


---In amelyachtowners@..., <divanz620@...> wrote :

Hi Craig

They were not "loose" but I could take up about a sixth of a turn on each.

Nyloc nuts, washer, no Loctite...I might do that.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
Bound for Vanuatu


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

Barry Connor
 

Hello Steve and Liz,
Saw that you are OCC Hawaii Port Officers.
We would like to join the OCC, would you sponsor us?
The AMEL group is a wealth of information but feel the OCC would also help with our travels.
I completed an Atlantic crossing in 1999. We have owned our 54 for 3 years and are currently on what I call our shakedown cruise this summer in The Adriatic before heading off next year on our round the world. I would like to visit Hawaii again but on our boat, I lived in Hawaii for 4 years (1970-1074).
Look forward to hearing back.
Best Regards

Barry and Penny Connor
Amel 54.  #17
“Lady Penelope II”
Sailing Croatia


On Aug 3, 2018, at 20:46, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Mark,

Liz and I have been members of the OCC for about a year and a half. We are also the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and have enjoyed helping some other members with some logistics for planning a trip to Hawaii. We found the Port Officer for the Caribbean side of Panama to be a big help when we transited Panama. OCC has Port Officers In most of the world you plan on visiting, and I think you will find them a useful resource. Bottom line is that we feel membership is well worth the meager cost. 

Let me know if you need any more info, or if we can be off assistance if you decide to join. 

Aloha,

Steve and Liz
OCC Hawaii Port Officers
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii

On Aug 3, 2018, at 07:27, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Ian,

 

Thank you so much for the feedback.

 

Cindy will say I need no encouragement to go and knock on another boat (Amel or otherwise).. I am that pest in the anchorage who will introduce himself.

 

Do you think the OCC group will be of use beyond the Panama canal and west?

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 3, 2018 9:40 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Hi  Mark,

 

 We have been members since our qualifying trip in 1981.  The OCC is a virtual club in the sense that it doesn't have a clubhouse and its 2000 odd members  ( maybe more now) are scattered across the globe. It produces a newsletter every 6 months or so and a 200 odd page journal twice a year with cruising stories from members.

 

 The choice of 1,000 miles between points is obviously an arbitrary one, as is the size of the boat, but they were chosen by the originator of the club over 50 years ago and have served well. It puts the O in OCC.

 

 You will now find port officers in most countries,  a voluntary role often filled by someone who has swallowed the hook but still wants to be involved in the cruising world. We have used them to good effect in finding stores, reliable technicians etc in new ports.

 

 Like any club member, when you see an OCC burgee in an anchorage it's irresistible to meet them for a beer and in contrast to almost every other  club they might come from one of 20 or more different countries.

 

I am sorry that the rules suggested to you  that the OCC is bureaucratic---it's very far from that. Amongst its members you will find some of the most adventurous and free spirited folk afloat, some of whose whose achievements will amaze  you.   Rallies where boats sail together  are a rare feature in the club. Normally an OCC rally has meant meeting in an anchorage for a drink, rather than a cruise in company. I suspect that a significant majority of OCC members prefer to do  their own thing , occasionally meeting to share their experiences.

 

 Sharing experiences is what the OCC is all about. There is a small  number of dinners or BBQ's or whatever held  each year in different countries, particularly but not only the UK and US East coast, but I suspect that most members only ever meet other members in a cockpit somewhere. On one extraordinary day we were one of 4 OCC boats who met in Caleta Beaulieu in the Beagle Channel. We all knew each other but it was pure chance that we all happened to be close by  at the same time. 

 

  Arguably,  OCC membership really comes into its own not in the Med or Caribbean , which are socially crowded places, but in some far flung anchorage  where you least expect to see another boat , but there is  yacht with an OCC burgee at her port spreaders.  You make friends for life like that--just as you would if you came across another Amel in such circumstances.

 

 Fair winds,

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 03 August 2018 12:33:46
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Steve,

 

Interesting to see you are OCC Port Officers.

 

A couple of months ago I looked into joining the OCC but really struggled to see the value. The forum seem light and I assumed it was because of lack of members. Some of the subjects hadn’t been posted in since last year.

 

I had a hard time with the qualifications that sort of appeared a bit snobby to me such as “must have completed a non-stop ocean passage between two ports, where the distance between the ports is not less than 1,000 nautical miles measured by the shortest practical Great Circle route, as skipper or member of the crew in a vessel of not more than 70ft (21.3 m) LOA I scratched my head and wondered why you couldn’t join if you had done a 999 mile passage on a 71’ yacht J  - or - An Associate Member must have made a clear commitment to achieve the qualifying passage in a realistic and reasonable time-scale. The time allowed is at the discretion of the General Committee and shall take account of all the circumstances of each individual applicant, but it shall not normally exceed three years. Anyway this really sort of put me off.

 

We reconsidered joining when we looked at joining the Suzie Too OCC rally. But our golden rule of sailing on our own schedule prevented us from doing so.. We are heading in the same direction as the Suzie Too but will not go as far north of Panama.

 

Sorry for the long-winded note but I am wondering if you have found the membership beneficial and to what extent do you use it? Any other OCC members, please chime in.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

 

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken teeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect.

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage... When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction.

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement of all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion.. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end pieces from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them.

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendation is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together.

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing.

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii

 


Genoa for a Sharki

Gregory Shea
 

A long shot. I have a Dacron 150 Genoa for a Sharki that I must get rid of to make way for a new sail I have on order. It is destined for the dumpster by Wednesday next week unless someone wants it. Located at Cleopatra Marina in Peveza. Someone would have to pick it up, I have no way to ship it.


Greg Shea
Sharki 133
Cap des Iles


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Mark,


Steve and Liz have probably answered your question.   There are lots of ways of getting info on a new place--some people love cruisers' nets, Seven Seas etc. We used a mixture in  our 7 year circumnavigation of South America and found them all useful . I am rather attached to the OCC .  Back in 1981 there were no radio nets--we didn't even have a radio on board-- so the OCC was a good source of info for us. For a while in the '90s I was on the committee when we had less than 1.000 members and probably only 5 or 6 port officers. Its expansion since then suggests that people enjoy it and find it useful.


 You don't have to be  afloat to take advantage--I was once visiting Sydney and wanted to sail in Sydney Harbour. I could have chartered a boat for the day , but who better to contact than the port officer who took me out  himself.  They say that a sailor has a girl in every port --well, an OCC member can say that she/he has a friend in every port.


Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... on behalf of 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: 03 August 2018 17:27:47
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC
 


Ian,

 

Thank you so much for the feedback.

 

Cindy will say I need no encouragement to go and knock on another boat (Amel or otherwise). I am that pest in the anchorage who will introduce himself.

 

Do you think the OCC group will be of use beyond the Panama canal and west?

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 3, 2018 9:40 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Hi  Mark,

 

 We have been members since our qualifying trip in 1981.  The OCC is a virtual club in the sense that it doesn't have a clubhouse and its 2000 odd members  ( maybe more now) are scattered across the globe. It produces a newsletter every 6 months or so and a 200 odd page journal twice a year with cruising stories from members.

 

 The choice of 1,000 miles between points is obviously an arbitrary one, as is the size of the boat, but they were chosen by the originator of the club over 50 years ago and have served well. It puts the O in OCC.

 

 You will now find port officers in most countries,  a voluntary role often filled by someone who has swallowed the hook but still wants to be involved in the cruising world. We have used them to good effect in finding stores, reliable technicians etc in new ports.

 

 Like any club member, when you see an OCC burgee in an anchorage it's irresistible to meet them for a beer and in contrast to almost every other  club they might come from one of 20 or more different countries.

 

I am sorry that the rules suggested to you  that the OCC is bureaucratic---it's very far from that. Amongst its members you will find some of the most adventurous and free spirited folk afloat, some of whose whose achievements will amaze  you.   Rallies where boats sail together  are a rare feature in the club. Normally an OCC rally has meant meeting in an anchorage for a drink, rather than a cruise in company. I suspect that a significant majority of OCC members prefer to do  their own thing , occasionally meeting to share their experiences.

 

 Sharing experiences is what the OCC is all about. There is a small  number of dinners or BBQ's or whatever held  each year in different countries, particularly but not only the UK and US East coast, but I suspect that most members only ever meet other members in a cockpit somewhere. On one extraordinary day we were one of 4 OCC boats who met in Caleta Beaulieu in the Beagle Channel. We all knew each other but it was pure chance that we all happened to be close by  at the same time. 

 

  Arguably,  OCC membership really comes into its own not in the Med or Caribbean , which are socially crowded places, but in some far flung anchorage  where you least expect to see another boat , but there is  yacht with an OCC burgee at her port spreaders.  You make friends for life like that--just as you would if you came across another Amel in such circumstances.

 

 Fair winds,

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... on behalf of 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: 03 August 2018 12:33:46
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Steve,

 

Interesting to see you are OCC Port Officers.

 

A couple of months ago I looked into joining the OCC but really struggled to see the value. The forum seem light and I assumed it was because of lack of members. Some of the subjects hadn’t been posted in since last year.

 

I had a hard time with the qualifications that sort of appeared a bit snobby to me such as “must have completed a non-stop ocean passage between two ports, where the distance between the ports is not less than 1,000 nautical miles measured by the shortest practical Great Circle route, as skipper or member of the crew in a vessel of not more than 70ft (21.3 m) LOA I scratched my head and wondered why you couldn’t join if you had done a 999 mile passage on a 71’ yacht J  - or - An Associate Member must have made a clear commitment to achieve the qualifying passage in a realistic and reasonable time-scale. The time allowed is at the discretion of the General Committee and shall take account of all the circumstances of each individual applicant, but it shall not normally exceed three years. Anyway this really sort of put me off.

 

We reconsidered joining when we looked at joining the Suzie Too OCC rally. But our golden rule of sailing on our own schedule prevented us from doing so.. We are heading in the same direction as the Suzie Too but will not go as far north of Panama.

 

Sorry for the long-winded note but I am wondering if you have found the membership beneficial and to what extent do you use it? Any other OCC members, please chime in.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

 

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken teeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect.

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage... When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction.

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement of all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion.. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end pieces from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them.

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendation is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together.

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing.

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii