Date   

Re: Slowing down in increasing winds

greatketch@...
 

It is important to remember that the Amel tackles are vangs to pull the boom down and control sail shape, and are really very poorly set up to function as preventers--no matter what Amel calls them.

Anytime the boom is further outboard of the end of the traveler, we tension the vang to control sail shape and keep leech tension up and reduce excessive twist.  The boat goes faster with the whole sail, top to bottom, trimmed to a proper angle to the wind

In strong winds and rough seas counting on a line connected to the middle of the boom to stop an accidental gybe is a very bad idea.  Never on an Amel, but on other boats, I have seen lines rigged that way cause the boom to fold in half in an accidental gybe, or when a deep roll caused the end of the boom to dip into a wave.  That ruins your whole day.

A REAL preventer is attached at the outboard END of the boom and lead forward, then aft to the cockpit so it can be eased--under control--if needed.  

We never sail wing-on-wing on Harmonie.  If we are going downwind, the ballooner is set. If we are not going downwind long enough to justify the effort of the ballooner, we reach at 150 degrees to the true wind and then we make better VMG downwind than we would wing-on-wing.  If we really need to sail straight downwind a short distance for some reason, I furl the main and go jib-n-jigger. We might lose a little speed, but for a short distance, the peace of mind is more than worth it to me.

I personally would never sail wing-on-wing with the main boom anything other than fully out to the shrouds.  An accidental gybe happens when the boom crosses the wind.  If the boom is not all the way out--as far as it can go--you make an accidental gybe that much more likely.  It is not worth it.

The number of boats I have seen seriously damaged by an accidental gybe has taught me to avoid them at all cost.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Norfolk, VA, USA


Re: Slowing down in increasing winds

greatketch@...
 

.......and talking of snagging something, how many times has your main sheet got caught around that knob near the centerline that latches the windscreen shut?

Errrr... Never!  Not once in 20,000 miles. I am not sure how that could even happen.  

In a tack the mainsheet is tight at the beginning middle and end.  During a gybe, the mainsheet is tightened and the traveler moved before the stern is turned through the wind.  Other than an accidental gybe, when would you ever let the boom move across with a slack mainsheet?  

Even in an accidental gybe, the wind is from aft and the traveler off to what was the leeward side, there is STILL no way for the sheet to snag that knob.  

Maybe you just don't use the traveler as you should?

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Norfolk, VA, USA


Re: SM2000 353 Indecent

richard.colebatch <no_reply@...>
 

Could you also send the info to me please.  richardcolebatch609@...

Many thanks.


Re: SM2000 353 Indecent

Michael Ward
 

Please send sale info.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

karkauai
 

Hmmm, maybe I’m just lucky, but that’s never happened on Kristy.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: rig tuning

greatketch@...
 

Ryan (and everybody else)

The one thing I hate about this forum host is the totally AWFUL search capabilities it has.  It took a bit of digging to find, but here is the link to the rigging procedure that Olivier posted. It is really helpful, and makes things really clear.  There are several things in the initial set up that are going to be unique to the precision that Amel used in building these boats, but the final tensioning is pretty much the way I always handled any boat.


If you have an Amel to which this procedure relates, do what I just did and SAVE this link, and print it out for future reference.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Norfolk, VA, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: crash Jibe

 

I am with you, Kent.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Tue, May 29, 2018 at 5:34 PM, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

If we are sailing on a broad reach less that AWA <145d, I don’t usually rig a preventer.  Anything aft of 145d I do.


If we were on a broad reach at AWA 135 the car would be all the way over.  The sheet would be out enough that in a sudden jibe (say autopilot failure or having to jibe quickly to avoid hitting something) the boom would swing 1/2 way across the deck uncontrolled before the sheet and car caught the load.  It does seem that some of the shock load on the boom and sheet and car would be softened if the car was allowed to move.

I’m kind of on the fence about this one.  If we’re worried about an uncontrolled jibe, we should probably have a preventer on any time the wind is aft of the beam.  I do think sail shape is better on a broad reach with the preventer on anyway.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM243

On May 29, 2018, at 2:29 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Hi. I would not choose to lift that button before a gybe as the car sliding across to a sudden crash stop increases the impact on all involved items including mainsheet boom attachment.  I always gybe leaving the traveller in place which makes for a gentle clunk main boom move rather than a almighty whump. I then, in a very controlled manner wind the traveller to the new side.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean pearl

On 30 May 2018 at 06:13 "Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Thanks. I forgot to mention that. It could easily be a broken bone the speed the winch handle would go!


Ian


On 29 May 2018, at 08:27, ' dancarlson367@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

That sounds like a good idea.


One build on that recco however, you either want to have removed the winch handle or make sure the area is well clear, as the winch will spin very fast as the traveller moves across.

Dan and Lori Carlson, sv BeBe, SM#387




 

One minor point if you haven’t come across it.
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)

 

 

 


 


 



Re: crash Jibe

karkauai
 

If we are sailing on a broad reach less that AWA <145d, I don’t usually rig a preventer.  Anything aft of 145d I do.

If we were on a broad reach at AWA 135 the car would be all the way over.  The sheet would be out enough that in a sudden jibe (say autopilot failure or having to jibe quickly to avoid hitting something) the boom would swing 1/2 way across the deck uncontrolled before the sheet and car caught the load.  It does seem that some of the shock load on the boom and sheet and car would be softened if the car was allowed to move.

I’m kind of on the fence about this one.  If we’re worried about an uncontrolled jibe, we should probably have a preventer on any time the wind is aft of the beam.  I do think sail shape is better on a broad reach with the preventer on anyway.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM243

On May 29, 2018, at 2:29 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi. I would not choose to lift that button before a gybe as the car sliding across to a sudden crash stop increases the impact on all involved items including mainsheet boom attachment.  I always gybe leaving the traveller in place which makes for a gentle clunk main boom move rather than a almighty whump. I then, in a very controlled manner wind the traveller to the new side.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean pearl

On 30 May 2018 at 06:13 "Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks. I forgot to mention that. It could easily be a broken bone the speed the winch handle would go!


Ian


On 29 May 2018, at 08:27, ' dancarlson367@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

That sounds like a good idea.


One build on that recco however, you either want to have removed the winch handle or make sure the area is well clear, as the winch will spin very fast as the traveller moves across.

Dan and Lori Carlson, sv BeBe, SM#387




 

One minor point if you haven’t come across it.
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)

 

 

 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

James Alton
 

Ian,

   The wife of the previous owner of our boat had her wrist broken by the spinning mainsheet traveller handle.   I am not sure if a jibe was involved in the accident but the pin that locked the winch from turning released unexpectantly so was either not fully engaged or failed and her arm was in the way.    The handle for the mainsheet traveller winch on my boat is actually bolted to the winch so is not removable without a wrench.  I am thinking of upgrading  to the style used on the SM with the removable winch handle.  

   Some great discussion here.

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On May 29, 2018, at 2:13 PM, Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Thanks. I forgot to mention that. It could easily be a broken bone the speed the winch handle would go!


Ian


On 29 May 2018, at 08:27, 'dancarlson367@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

That sounds like a good idea.


One build on that recco however, you either want to have removed the winch handle or make sure the area is well clear, as the winch will spin very fast as the traveller moves across.

Dan and Lori Carlson, sv BeBe, SM#387




 

One minor point if you haven’t come across it. 
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: rig tuning

Ryan Meador
 

Hi Bill,

Thanks for the info.  I really don't want to try to slack all my rigging and start from scratch.  I'm not sure I'm strong enough to get it back tight again, and I also don't trust that the mast won't fall over while it's loose.  I need to find a professional.  I haven't been able to find Olivier's rig tuning guide, unless it's the one I linked in my first post, but I don't think it is.

I did end up tightening my forestay to no avail.  In a windy rain storm late at night.  It changed the frequency of the pumping, but didn't eliminate it.  I'm not convinced it was necessary or even a good idea, since the mast did have a slight bend forward before I started tightening the backstay.  Also, now the forestay turnbuckle only has about one more turn of adjustment left in it before it bottoms out.

Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



On Mon, May 28, 2018 at 8:08 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Ryan,


Some thoughts.  

I have never been able to tune a rig accurately “by ear”.  I always use a loos tension gauge, or the stretch method with the meter stick.  But... that only gets you so far.  

Taking the boat out sailing in a good breeze is a very important part of the process.  Skipping that step, out of economic requirements, is why so many “Professional” riggers come up short in tuning rigs, and not just Amels. 

Olivier has written an excellent summary on tuning that is here in the archives.  The is no reason you can’t slack all the rigging and start as if your mast was newly stepped.  

If your back stay was too loose, then your forestay must be too, assuming the mast is straight, since they pull in opposition to each other.

Bill Kinney
Sm160, Harmonie
Norfolk, VA, USA




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Patrick McAneny
 

Before I gybe I crank in the main close to center line then during the gybe the main and boom has little distance to travel or build momentum . I then immediately ease the mainsheet for the new tack. I would not allow my boom /main to travel uncontrolled across the deck , if the main sheet snagged something , it could be ugly, plus as Danny said the load on the sail etc would be very great. I not only crank in the main before executing a gybe , I grab the main and pull it to windward creating a bit of bow in the sheet which further reduces the travel and creates a little shock absorption when the sail comes across.
Pat
SM#123 . 


-----Original Message-----
From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, May 29, 2018 3:38 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

 
Hi. I would not choose to lift that button before a gybe as the car sliding across to a sudden crash stop increases the impact on all involved items including mainsheet boom attachment.  I always gybe leaving the traveller in place which makes for a gentle clunk main boom move rather than a almighty whump. I then, in a very controlled manner wind the traveller to the new side.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean pearl
On 30 May 2018 at 06:13 "Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
Thanks. I forgot to mention that. It could easily be a broken bone the speed the winch handle would go!

Ian


On 29 May 2018, at 08:27, ' dancarlson3 67@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
That sounds like a good idea.

One build on that recco however, you either want to have removed the winch handle or make sure the area is well clear, as the winch will spin very fast as the traveller moves across.

Dan and Lori Carlson, sv BeBe, SM#387




 
One minor point if you haven’t come across it.
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

I an

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)

 
 
 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Permanent 24 to 12 v converter

 

Paul, 

Like many things, it is a long story. I will try to accurately tell you the story that someone at Amel told me.

The original SM design was was standard with three Thrane & Thrane 24 to 12VDC converters, which all switched OFF with the Main Battery Switches:
Permanent which powered the AM/FM radio, the 12VDC receptacle at the Nav Station and the cigarette lighter.
Hydra which powered 12VDC B&G Instruments
Sailor VHF which powered the 12VDC VHF
​Sometime after SM production began some EU owners complained that when they turned OFF the main battery switches, they lost their AM/FM radio station frequency presets. Surprisingly (to me), Mr. Amel changed the design to add a toggle switch ​on the Permanent to turn it OFF and wired the Permanent directly to the battery bank. This allowed the complainers to keep their AM/FM presets. When you turn OFF the battery main switches, you will still see an amp draw until you turn OFF that toggle switch.

All of the above said, neither you nor I know if your boat is still wired the way it was originally, but I hope my explanation helps answer your question.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Tue, May 29, 2018 at 9:07 AM, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Paul,

On Kristy, there are five 24-12v converters. 
One of the green Sailors is marked Permanent.  It is always connected directly to the battery bank and allows your AM/FM radio to hold it’s “memory” of radio stations.  I’ve also wired my 12v charging equipment (cigarette lighter and USB).  There are connection points in the wires (+ & -) in the battery compartment with fuses.

The two other of the green Sailor converters feed the nav equipment and VHF.  They are wired to the onboard of the three breakers in the hanging locker.

A fourth converter is for the SSB and is controlled by the middle breaker in the hanging locker.

The fifth converter feeds the amplifier for my stereo system and is connected to the outboard of the three breakers in the hanging locker.

I don’t have any converters mounted anywhere else.


Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243



Re: Permanent 24 to 12 v converter

Philippe Morel
 

Hello , on BELAVITA nº 238 , we’ve 3 sailors regulators which provide 24v and 12 v , to cut both 24 & 12 , two circuit break et in the locker 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi. I would not choose to lift that button before a gybe as the car sliding across to a sudden crash stop increases the impact on all involved items including mainsheet boom attachment.  I always gybe leaving the traveller in place which makes for a gentle clunk main boom move rather than a almighty whump. I then, in a very controlled manner wind the traveller to the new side.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean pearl

On 30 May 2018 at 06:13 "Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks. I forgot to mention that. It could easily be a broken bone the speed the winch handle would go!


Ian


On 29 May 2018, at 08:27, ' dancarlson367@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

That sounds like a good idea.


One build on that recco however, you either want to have removed the winch handle or make sure the area is well clear, as the winch will spin very fast as the traveller moves across.

Dan and Lori Carlson, sv BeBe, SM#387




 

One minor point if you haven’t come across it.
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)

 

 

 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Ian Park
 

Thanks. I forgot to mention that. It could easily be a broken bone the speed the winch handle would go!

Ian


On 29 May 2018, at 08:27, 'dancarlson367@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

That sounds like a good idea.


One build on that recco however, you either want to have removed the winch handle or make sure the area is well clear, as the winch will spin very fast as the traveller moves across.

Dan and Lori Carlson, sv BeBe, SM#387




 

One minor point if you haven’t come across it.
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)


Re: Dome light in aft lazarette needs replacing

Derick Gates
 

Thanks Joel, that explains it.  I will ask Amel.SAV. All the similar ones on-line appear to be 12 Volt, but I think for the Amel 24 volt system I just need to change the bulb to an appropriate 24 Volt LED one.  

Re: resale of SM2K#400 some time in the future, are you interested personally, or as a broker?  If personally, it would be a fitting full circle. I still have the picture of the Mary Brown and her namesake in the navigation station drawer, and show it to visitors.  If as a broker, I currently have no intention of swallowing the anchor, but will leave instructions to my heirs to contact you after "the big one".  I hope you have to wait a long, long time. 😎

By the way, in Le Marin in January 2018 I was on the Amel Dock next to Luc, your old friend and Amel sales executive with whom you shared the Mary Brown.  He told me, "I know that boat well - when it was first built I was a 1/3 owner."  He showed me his own Super Maramu 'S' which he had specially adapted for him, with many good ideas that I liked, including a cockpit adjustable mizzen traveler setup (with no drilling into the cabin top) and a vertical rod to secure the dish drawers next to the love seat for heavy seas (the drawer latch on the bottom just broke on Brava for lack of same). He and his wife are well and continue to sail in retirement.

Hope all is well with you.

Derick Gates
SM2K#400
Brava (AKA Mary Brown; AKA Ulys of Tortola)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Permanent 24 to 12 v converter

karkauai
 

Hi Paul,
On Kristy, there are five 24-12v converters. 
One of the green Sailors is marked Permanent.  It is always connected directly to the battery bank and allows your AM/FM radio to hold it’s “memory” of radio stations.  I’ve also wired my 12v charging equipment (cigarette lighter and USB).  There are connection points in the wires (+ & -) in the battery compartment with fuses.

The two other of the green Sailor converters feed the nav equipment and VHF.  They are wired to the onboard of the three breakers in the hanging locker.

A fourth converter is for the SSB and is controlled by the middle breaker in the hanging locker.

The fifth converter feeds the amplifier for my stereo system and is connected to the outboard of the three breakers in the hanging locker.

I don’t have any converters mounted anywhere else.


Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dome light in aft lazarette needs replacing

amelforme
 

Hi Derick.
When your SM53 #400 was built for me originally, I ordered optional lights for both the cockpit port side locker and the stern locker. Amel had a fairly extensive list of options that we didn’t actively sell but could respond in the positive if someone asked for additions and enhancements.
I can’t remember what these extra lights look like so if they are different than the other lights fitted elsewhere, send a photo to Apres Vende and see what they can do for you. 
When you are finished enjoying Brava, please keep me in mind.

Have fun on your Amel! Joel

JOEL F. POTTER
CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
Office 954-462-5869 

On May 28, 2018, at 4:03 PM, derickgates@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,


After five years of ownership, I just discovered that the aft lazarette has a dome light. How did I find it? I was cleaning out the lazarette at night and noticed a light was on.  Having discovered the dome light, I went to switch it off.  Instead, it just dimmed to about 1/3 the intensity.  I tapped on the dome a little too hard, and found that the glass of the dome was now in 3 pieces, but the light still would not turn off.  Switching off the aft lights on the 24 volt panel did cut the power to the dome light, but otherwise it looks like the switch in the dome light is faulty and needs replacing.


Does anyone know where to get these dome light fixtures?  


Derick Gates

SM2K#400

Brava

Currently on the hard in Antigua for hurricane season


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Dan Carlson
 

That sounds like a good idea.

One build on that recco however, you either want to have removed the winch handle or make sure the area is well clear, as the winch will spin very fast as the traveller moves across.

Dan and Lori Carlson, sv BeBe, SM#387




On Tue, May 29, 2018 at 7:55 AM, Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners]
 

One minor point if you haven’t come across it.
If your main sheet traveller is across when running (I assume we all do that) - if you know you are about to crash gybe, just lift the button on the Anderson winch traveller and put it across to the other side. The boom will take the car with it, but it slows the gybe as the ropes, pulleys and winch partially absorb the shock, and puts less strain on the whole system.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96 (Antigua)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dome light in aft lazarette needs replacing

amelforme
 

Hi Derick.
When your SM53 #400 was built for me originally, I ordered optional lights for both the cockpit port side locker and the stern locker. Amel had a fairly extensive list of options that we didn’t actively sell but could respond in the positive if someone asked for additions and enhancements.
I can’t remember what these extra lights look like so if they are different than the other lights fitted elsewhere, send a photo to Apres Vende and see what they can do for you. 
When you are finished enjoying Brava, please keep me in mind.

Have fun on your Amel! Joel

JOEL F. POTTER
CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
Office 954-462-5869 

On May 28, 2018, at 4:03 PM, derickgates@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,


After five years of ownership, I just discovered that the aft lazarette has a dome light. How did I find it? I was cleaning out the lazarette at night and noticed a light was on.  Having discovered the dome light, I went to switch it off.  Instead, it just dimmed to about 1/3 the intensity.  I tapped on the dome a little too hard, and found that the glass of the dome was now in 3 pieces, but the light still would not turn off.  Switching off the aft lights on the 24 volt panel did cut the power to the dome light, but otherwise it looks like the switch in the dome light is faulty and needs replacing.


Does anyone know where to get these dome light fixtures?  


Derick Gates

SM2K#400

Brava

Currently on the hard in Antigua for hurricane season