Date   

Gearbox and generator problems- related issue?

Dean Gillies
 

Hi folks,
We had a problem today where our shaft brake jammed on, resulting in smoke/smell from gearbox (ZFE25) area (from the pads I believe). On checking the ATF I found the plastic dipstick was totally deformed from heat. I managed to unlock the brake manually with some advice from the Facebook group, and have limped to an anchorage.

On trying to start the generator after anchoring I get the error flashes (7) indicating no raw water flow (flow sensor presumably, as it didn’t run long enough to warm up).

The raw water filter is spotless.

At this stage I’m trying to determine if there is a common root cause. The raw water to the engine seems fine, but I’m wondering whether there is a commonality between the generator cooling water feed and the gearbox oil cooler?
The generator raw water issue seems like an odd coincidence!

Also, if anyone can tell me the exact dimensions from the underside of the gearbox dipstick to the hi/Lo marks then that would be really helpful. My dipstick is unusable!

Cheers
Dean
SY Stella
Amel 54 #154


Free Riza Arch for Super Maramu

steve_morrison@...
 

Hello All. I have a new stainless arch from Riza (Turkey) that was made for a Super Maramu, and its free to you if you want it. It is in storage in Ft Lauderdale and I will be driving down there next week to pick up solar panels for my new Atlantic towers arch. Riza's stainless arch is headed for recycling unless someone wants it. I thought the fit was horrible and all estimates I had for remaking the attachments seemed more trouble than just starting over with Atlantic Tower's Super Maramu kit.


Let me know if you want to pick it up next Friday or if you want to take over the payments for the storage unit ($60/month I think).


Steve Morrison
SM 380 TouRai
Hilton Head, SC



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine cruising RPM

Kim Kimball <dhk@...>
 

Yeah.  Water injection would have been nice.  Our naturally aspirated 2-stroke diesels, running at constant speed of course, never carboned up.

But the turbos on the EMDs were a mistake in design.  Cummins too, though I don't think they were optional on those.  When I saw EMDs with blowers instead of turbos I cheered.  Although the number of turbo failures on my ships was blessedly small.

Kim


On 7/10/18 10:37 PM, carcodespam@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 
I have worked also many years as chief engineer on cargo ships. Main engines has often been 2-stroke Diesel with turbos. To clean the turbos they was feeded from time to time with a water injection. This temperature shock loosen the dirt and through it out. Another type of 2-stroke Diesel called Modag was used for generators and oiled like hell. It was common their eshaust pipe takes fire from the oil inside. When that happens they were idled and the exhaust was burned out at observed condition.
Boat Diesel are usually small 4-stroke engines with other behaviors. Most problems we have in Europe is the bad fuel. In Europe gasoil is mixed with 10 % biodiesel. Biodiesl-eating microbes blocks filters and tubes and leads to a brown-black thick coating and dirt in the tank.

Gerhard, Amel Sharki #60


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nikimat

Porter McRoberts
 

I know your feelings Alex. 
It’s just such a loss to everyone on the forum as well to not have you Sailing, and so selfishly we all push. I hope things go well with Arno!!
All fine here, save I have a Volvo problem that would be fixed in an afternoon in Martinique and we have been here a month. 
Crazy

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Jul 11, 2018, at 5:47 AM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Good morning Porter,

Replying off the forum.
I am in Martinique helping a friend (Arno, new on the forum) to purchase his 54. I mentioned you to him a few times.
I don’t know about another boat… often I look, but I don’t think my heart would be as much in it as it was for NIKIMAT, but will see.
Hope your trip is going well!!!
Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 7/10/18, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nikimat
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 10:31 PM


 









Made me sick to see her pulling into st
Martin. Same here. Alex needs a new
boat!
PorterA54-152. Panama
City 

Sent from my
iPad
On Jul 10,
2018, at 7:08 PM, steve_morrison@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Just finished watching the latest
Sailing La Vagabonde (Episode 150), and early on, they show
a post Irma Nikimat at anchor.  Hard to see her like that.
 My heart goes out to Alex. 
All the
best,Steve
MorrisonSM380
TouRaiHilton Head, SC





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: leak in saloon drain hose

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Ryan,

Having used Captain Tolley's (AMAZING) Creeping Crack Cure on some hair-line window leaks with great success, I don't think it's quite the right product, as it really needs to work by capillary action in minute cracks. It seems a leaking hose connection would be too big. Seal-All is designed to fill and "skin over" small actively leaking places (although they do have to be dry until it sets). You could certainly give it a try, of course, and if it works, well, it works,although my choice would be a few coats of the Seals-All. 

Cheers, Craig


---In amelyachtowners@..., <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote :

Hi Craig,

Thanks for the tips.  My best guess is that the leak is at the forward end of the main run, which is the bottom-right of the photo.  I'll try to confirm with some dye -- good idea!  The water kind of pools under the fitting and eventually flows aft, so it's not obvious where it comes from except that it's not either of the two top inlets.  I have some Captain Tolley's, I wonder if that would work for filling the mystery crack.  I was thinking I'd need to take the fitting out and replace the hose if the hose joint is where it's leaking (I already tried tightening the hose clamps) or replace the fitting if it had cracked.  It never occurred to me to try to fill the crack in situ.

Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 8:53 AM sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 


Yes, Ryan, that does look like one butt-ugly agglomeration of plumbing fittings - must  be French :-) I've never seen a Street Elbow with at "T" off the side and the white part looks like maybe a drain trap. The hoses are all standard stuff - I've cut the main run to add a "T" for my air conditioner and it's all plastic (no wire).

Anyway, I think I'd start with a roll of paper towels, dry it all off and try to spot the leak by alternately pouring water down each feed and dabbing around with the paper towel. Maybe use some blue holding tank deodorant as a dye to help spot the leak. If you find it, then try a patch with something like Seal-All.  I usually wouldn't recommend trying to seal a leak from the outside, but that assembly is going to be a beast to replace as it does look like it's glued together with PVC cement and the age-hardened hoses and tight space around make it worse.  Seal-All is cheap and it really does work wonders, even applied from the outside..

Rots 'o ruck!
Craig SN68.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote :

I'm concerned my photo didn't appear correctly because I can't find it on the Yahoo site, so I'm attaching it a difH

ferent way this time.  Hopefully this makes it more clear what I'm talking about.  Thanks!

On Mon, Jul 9, 2018 at 10:26 PM Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I have noticed a very slow leak in the drain hose that runs from the forward watertight bulkhead, beneath the floor in the saloon, to the area beneath the companionway.  It fills the space beneath the companionway stairs with water.  I think the leak is at the fitting where the dishwasher drain and air conditioning condensate T into it:

IMG_20180709_211135.jpg

I'm unsure if the leak is between the hose and the fitting, or the fitting itself has cracked.  I'm afraid to take it apart without a plan.  I'm wondering if someone can help me with a few questions:
  1. does this thing come apart?  it looks like the parts are glued, except the hose clamps
  2. what is the white part in the middle?
  3. do you know the inside diameters of the hoses?  is there anything special about the material of the one that runs the length of the saloon?
Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] C-drive oil

Mark Erdos
 

Chris,

 

Either one will do the job. Amel first stated to use 20-40 since it was common with the diesel engines and didn’t require an additional type of oil. But then, Amel stated filling with 90 oil during services in Martinique and France. This sparked a big discussion on the forum. The short answer is 90 SAE is best and 20-40 is 95% as good.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Curacao

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 10:33 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] C-drive oil

 

 

Just changed c-drive seals etc.
the oil that came out of my unit was definitely SAE-90 gear oil, I have just seems the sign saying SAE 20-40 at the header fill tank.
Which one?? Been looking through forum but unable to find info.

Launching tomorrow and need to know

Thanks in advance

Been a busy couple of days, 3x thru-valves changes, c-drive and transducers changed. 3100 mile trip ahead!!!! Thailand to Aus

Chris
Jaygo. SM224


C-drive oil

rettirc@...
 

Just changed c-drive seals etc.
the oil that came out of my unit was definitely SAE-90 gear oil, I have just seems the sign saying SAE 20-40 at the header fill tank.
Which one?? Been looking through forum but unable to find info.

Launching tomorrow and need to know

Thanks in advance

Been a busy couple of days, 3x thru-valves changes, c-drive and transducers changed. 3100 mile trip ahead!!!! Thailand to Aus

Chris
Jaygo. SM224


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: leak in saloon drain hose

Ryan Meador
 

Hi Craig,

Thanks for the tips.  My best guess is that the leak is at the forward end of the main run, which is the bottom-right of the photo.  I'll try to confirm with some dye -- good idea!  The water kind of pools under the fitting and eventually flows aft, so it's not obvious where it comes from except that it's not either of the two top inlets.  I have some Captain Tolley's, I wonder if that would work for filling the mystery crack.  I was thinking I'd need to take the fitting out and replace the hose if the hose joint is where it's leaking (I already tried tightening the hose clamps) or replace the fitting if it had cracked.  It never occurred to me to try to fill the crack in situ.

Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 8:53 AM sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 


Yes, Ryan, that does look like one butt-ugly agglomeration of plumbing fittings - must  be French :-) I've never seen a Street Elbow with at "T" off the side and the white part looks like maybe a drain trap. The hoses are all standard stuff - I've cut the main run to add a "T" for my air conditioner and it's all plastic (no wire).

Anyway, I think I'd start with a roll of paper towels, dry it all off and try to spot the leak by alternately pouring water down each feed and dabbing around with the paper towel. Maybe use some blue holding tank deodorant as a dye to help spot the leak. If you find it, then try a patch with something like Seal-All.  I usually wouldn't recommend trying to seal a leak from the outside, but that assembly is going to be a beast to replace as it does look like it's glued together with PVC cement and the age-hardened hoses and tight space around make it worse.  Seal-All is cheap and it really does work wonders, even applied from the outside..

Rots 'o ruck!
Craig SN68.


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

I'm concerned my photo didn't appear correctly because I can't find it on the Yahoo site, so I'm attaching it a difH

ferent way this time.  Hopefully this makes it more clear what I'm talking about.  Thanks!

On Mon, Jul 9, 2018 at 10:26 PM Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I have noticed a very slow leak in the drain hose that runs from the forward watertight bulkhead, beneath the floor in the saloon, to the area beneath the companionway.  It fills the space beneath the companionway stairs with water.  I think the leak is at the fitting where the dishwasher drain and air conditioning condensate T into it:

IMG_20180709_211135.jpg

I'm unsure if the leak is between the hose and the fitting, or the fitting itself has cracked.  I'm afraid to take it apart without a plan.  I'm wondering if someone can help me with a few questions:
  1. does this thing come apart?  it looks like the parts are glued, except the hose clamps
  2. what is the white part in the middle?
  3. do you know the inside diameters of the hoses?  is there anything special about the material of the one that runs the length of the saloon?
Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



Re: leak in saloon drain hose

Craig Briggs
 


Yes, Ryan, that does look like one butt-ugly agglomeration of plumbing fittings - must  be French :-) I've never seen a Street Elbow with at "T" off the side and the white part looks like maybe a drain trap. The hoses are all standard stuff - I've cut the main run to add a "T" for my air conditioner and it's all plastic (no wire).

Anyway, I think I'd start with a roll of paper towels, dry it all off and try to spot the leak by alternately pouring water down each feed and dabbing around with the paper towel. Maybe use some blue holding tank deodorant as a dye to help spot the leak. If you find it, then try a patch with something like Seal-All.  I usually wouldn't recommend trying to seal a leak from the outside, but that assembly is going to be a beast to replace as it does look like it's glued together with PVC cement and the age-hardened hoses and tight space around make it worse.  Seal-All is cheap and it really does work wonders, even applied from the outside..

Rots 'o ruck!
Craig SN68.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote :

I'm concerned my photo didn't appear correctly because I can't find it on the Yahoo site, so I'm attaching it a difH

ferent way this time.  Hopefully this makes it more clear what I'm talking about.  Thanks!


On Mon, Jul 9, 2018 at 10:26 PM Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I have noticed a very slow leak in the drain hose that runs from the forward watertight bulkhead, beneath the floor in the saloon, to the area beneath the companionway.  It fills the space beneath the companionway stairs with water.  I think the leak is at the fitting where the dishwasher drain and air conditioning condensate T into it:

IMG_20180709_211135.jpg

I'm unsure if the leak is between the hose and the fitting, or the fitting itself has cracked.  I'm afraid to take it apart without a plan.  I'm wondering if someone can help me with a few questions:
  1. does this thing come apart?  it looks like the parts are glued, except the hose clamps
  2. what is the white part in the middle?
  3. do you know the inside diameters of the hoses?  is there anything special about the material of the one that runs the length of the saloon?
Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nikimat

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good morning Porter,

Replying off the forum.
I am in Martinique helping a friend (Arno, new on the forum) to purchase his 54. I mentioned you to him a few times.
I don’t know about another boat… often I look, but I don’t think my heart would be as much in it as it was for NIKIMAT, but will see.
Hope your trip is going well!!!
Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 7/10/18, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nikimat
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 10:31 PM


 









Made me sick to see her pulling into st
Martin. Same here. Alex needs a new
boat!
PorterA54-152. Panama
City 

Sent from my
iPad
On Jul 10,
2018, at 7:08 PM, steve_morrison@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Just finished watching the latest
Sailing La Vagabonde (Episode 150), and early on, they show
a post Irma Nikimat at anchor.  Hard to see her like that.
 My heart goes out to Alex. 
All the
best,Steve
MorrisonSM380
TouRaiHilton Head, SC


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine cruising RPM

carcodespam@...
 

I have worked also many years as chief engineer on cargo ships. Main engines has often been 2-stroke Diesel with turbos. To clean the turbos they was feeded from time to time with a water injection. This temperature shock loosen the dirt and through it out. Another type of 2-stroke Diesel called Modag was used for generators and oiled like hell. It was common their eshaust pipe takes fire from the oil inside. When that happens they were idled and the exhaust was burned out at observed condition.
Boat Diesel are usually small 4-stroke engines with other behaviors. Most problems we have in Europe is the bad fuel. In Europe gasoil is mixed with 10 % biodiesel. Biodiesl-eating microbes blocks filters and tubes and leads to a brown-black thick coating and dirt in the tank.

Gerhard, Amel Sharki #60


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nikimat

Porter McRoberts
 

Made me sick to see her pulling into st Martin. 
Same here. Alex needs a new boat!

Porter
A54-152. 
Panama City 


On Jul 10, 2018, at 7:08 PM, steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Just finished watching the latest Sailing La Vagabonde (Episode 150), and early on, they show a post Irma Nikimat at anchor.  Hard to see her like that.  My heart goes out to Alex. 


All the best,

Steve Morrison

SM380 TouRai

Hilton Head, SC


Nikimat

steve_morrison@...
 

Just finished watching the latest Sailing La Vagabonde (Episode 150), and early on, they show a post Irma Nikimat at anchor.  Hard to see her like that.  My heart goes out to Alex. 


All the best,

Steve Morrison

SM380 TouRai

Hilton Head, SC


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine cruising RPM

Kim Kimball <dhk@...>
 

As a chief engineer of a service vessel with > 10 diesel engines,  including train engines, our rule of thumb was to operate at the correct operating temperature for the engine in question. That should be available in the manufacturer's documentation for your engine.

That being said, our main engines often had turbos, and we often had a requirement to idle them for hours.

Removing and replacing a turbo was a royal PITA ... and low operating temperature (low RPM) causes both engines and turbos to accumulate carbon (valves, vanes ...)

I got good at  replacing cylinder heads (not equipped to swap out valves) and not so good at the occasional turbo replacement.

Operating temperature is your friend.  If, no matter what RPM you're running, you can't reach the operating temperature, the most common culprit is a thermostat.

Kim

On 7/9/18 12:34 PM, Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
Thank you all for the info.  As I predicted going in, there is no simple answer.  But I think I have some guides now.

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 4:06 PM Courtney Gorman @itsfun1 <mailto:@itsfun1> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners@...>> wrote:

Amen Porter well said

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 8, 2018, at 12:41 PM, Porter McRoberts
portermcroberts@... <mailto:portermcroberts@...>
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>> wrote:

Teun,

Mostly true. New long block 800 hours ago and New injectors about
400 hours ago.
It is a common rail.
On a different topic. We’re currently stuck in panama with a bad
boost pressure sensor.
I have envy of anyone who can unplug the computer and have the
engine run.
The concept that a computer controlled engine be installed in a
world cruising sailboat seems antithetical to the purpose of a
sailboat, and to ours in particular.
I’ve been training (at your knees, and especially Bill R’s) for
the past year to be as self sufficient as possible, and to be
thwarted by a stray electron underscores how vulnerable we are.
Our cruising buddies are on a 1984 trintella. Sailed from
Croatia. They are in year #5. Old Perkins runs like a boss. I
asked my buddy, who is in his own right a Jedi of machinery, how
often he changes his fuel filters.  He chuckled.  “I don’t think
I’ve needed to do that” he said. Pressure’s good. Engine runs well.
I had engine envy. Not that the Volvo isn’t a fine piece of
hardware, but.... it’s the intersection of important and
complicated. Not a good combo. Like I say. Thank God for sails,
and the fact that we sailors got around just fine for the first
1000 years without motors.

In short. Seems like diesels (or the industry and associated
standards) took a step back in the past 15 years putting
efficiency over simplicity. I think Nigel Calder would agree.

Have wonderful Sundays. Without this motor glitch we wouldn’t
have seen the incredibly beautiful town of El Valle up here in
the Panamanian cordillera.

Porter, Helen and crew
S/V Ibis
54-152
Panama City


Sent from my iPad

On Jul 7, 2018, at 6:30 PM, Teun BAAS teun@...
<mailto:teun@...> [amelyachtowners]
<amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>> wrote:

Hi Porter,

I understood you had a new VOLVO installed. If so, *and it is a
common rail*, then there is *NO* need to run the engine on high
rpms to “burn out the soot”.

This is the specific instruction I got this week from the SYDNEY
VOLVO technician installing my VOLVO D3 110 H here in NOUMEA NEW
CALEDONIA.

Best Regards Teun

AMELIT  54 – 128

NOUMEA NEW CALEDONIA

Jul 08, 2018 10:27:44

*From:* amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
*Sent:* Sunday, July 08, 2018 10:24 AM
*To:* amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>
*Subject:* Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine cruising RPM

Thanks Mark.

If temp is the final data point, we cruise at about 79-80. What
should be the goal?

Thanks again!

Porter

Sent from my iPad


On Jul 7, 2018, at 11:13 AM, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@...
<mailto:mcerdos@gmail..com> [amelyachtowners]
<amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>> wrote:

Porter,

It really doesn’t matter how you do it but you need to
create internal engine heat to clean out the engine. This is
done with a load on the engine. If in neutral, it will take
longer to create a load and heat. In gear while underway
will heat up the engine faster.

This is true for all diesel engines.

Where you run the RPM depends on the engine. Typically, 80%
of max power will heat up the engine nicely without too much
strain. This is also good for the turbocharger, if fitted
with one.

How long? At least every couple of hours while underway, if
not a little more frequently... We run ours up every hour
for about five minutes. This works for us.

Keep in mind, this is not just the ship’s engine but also
true for the genset. Running a genset without load will
cause carbon buildup. Keep the genset loaded when charging
batteries etc. We find it best to run a couple of AC units
or do a load of laundry etc. The battery charger only puts
load on the genset at the beginning of the charge cycle.

Hope this helps.

With best regards,

Mark

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Curacao

www.creampuff.us <http://www.creampuff.us>

*From:*amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
*Sent:* Saturday, July 7, 2018 11:35 AM
*To:* amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>
*Subject:* Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine cruising RPM

Ok. Bullshit aside.

I do have a few real questions, that I’ve had for a while.

It’s the same for all diesels. Yes?

Is “racing” out of gear best? I would think load would be
required to increase fuel consumption and thus heat. Fuel
burn>>heat dissipation 2/2 raw water flow.

Forget the rpm. Where is the throttle?  100% down? 80%?

And for how long?

Many thanks, as always to this great group.

Porter

A54-152.

Excuse the errors.

Sent from my IPhone

Www.fouribis.com <http://Www.fouribis.com>


On Jul 7, 2018, at 9:02 AM, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@...
<mailto:mcerdos@...> [amelyachtowners]
<amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>> wrote:

Bob,

Wow! Sorry. I didn’t realize I had to be so freaking
specific. Seriously! The essence of the post I made is
100% correct. I didn’t intend to make a verbatim quote
of the manual. If  I had, I would have used quotation
marks. I stated this is OUTLINED in the manual. I did
not say this is a DIRECT QUOTE from the manual. Geeez!
And, please note I did say 4JH4 manual, not 4JH3 as you
are quoting.

But if you want specific details of the JH4 Operation
Manual, publication number OAJH4-G00102, page 78. I
quote, “Periodically operate the engine near maximum
speed while underway. This will generate higher exhaust
temperatures, which help clean out hard carbon deposits,
maintain engine performance and prolong the life of the
engine”

This is below the section you quote about running it in
idle and speaks specifically about running the engine
_while underway_.

Regardless of whether this is done in neutral or in gear
while underway, the purpose of the procedure is to raise
the internal temperature of the engine periodically to
remove carbon build up. Carbon build up will kill a
diesel engine.

I’m feelin’ a little crabby today. Can you tell?

With best regards,

Mark

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Curacao

www.creampuff.us <http://www.creampuff.us>

*From:*amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
*Sent:* Saturday, July 7, 2018 3:20 AM
*To:* amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners@...>
*Subject:* RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine cruising RPM

Hi Mark,

Regarding "Running a lower RPMs without load will
shorten the life of the engine unless it is pushed up at
least once per hour for about 5 minutes. This is
outlinede in the Yanmar operation manual."

This is not to challenge the veracity of your statement
but I cannot find that in my Yanmar manual. Maybe you
have a different manual and it would be helpful (really)
to have you quote what it says.

What my 4JH3-HTE Operation Manual says (on page 30
section 4.6) is:

"When operating the engine at low speed ffor long
periods of time, race the engine once every 2
hours"..."Racing the Engine, Morse Remote Control Handle
Pull out the handle lever...and shift the engine speed
from high to low several times...Racing the engine
removes carbon built up in the compustion chamber around
the fuel injection valve. Neglecting to race tthe engine
will cause the exhaust to turn black and lower the
efficiency of the engine".

In other words it says to gun the engine several times
while it is in neutral.

Like others, we vary my speed between 1600 and 2200 for
cruising and can cruise up to 2400 rpm. We also run it
at say 2800 for 5 minutes or so periodically. However, I
cannot find where Yanmar recommends this.  There are
postings in this group (not yours) that say to run it
full out for 5 minutes, even full out fo 30 minutes but
I don't think that is advisable. Seems that vibration is
higher and it might be hard on the transmission and c
drive as well.  Like most of us we vary the speed and
run it harder at times but we also do the "Racing"
procedure that is in our manual.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI #429

La Maddalena, Sardegna


Re: leak in saloon drain hose

Ryan Meador
 

I'm concerned my photo didn't appear correctly because I can't find it on the Yahoo site, so I'm attaching it a different way this time.  Hopefully this makes it more clear what I'm talking about.  Thanks!


On Mon, Jul 9, 2018 at 10:26 PM Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I have noticed a very slow leak in the drain hose that runs from the forward watertight bulkhead, beneath the floor in the saloon, to the area beneath the companionway.  It fills the space beneath the companionway stairs with water.  I think the leak is at the fitting where the dishwasher drain and air conditioning condensate T into it:



I'm unsure if the leak is between the hose and the fitting, or the fitting itself has cracked.  I'm afraid to take it apart without a plan.  I'm wondering if someone can help me with a few questions:
  1. does this thing come apart?  it looks like the parts are glued, except the hose clamps
  2. what is the white part in the middle?
  3. do you know the inside diameters of the hoses?  is there anything special about the material of the one that runs the length of the saloon?
Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



Re: Genoa electric furling gears

Duane Siegfri
 

Kostas,

Could you post the plans Maude sends you in the files section?  As time goes on Amel will be less and less likely to stock them and the plans will help a lot.

Much appreciated,
Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Genoa electric furling gears

Kostas Ioannidis <kostas_ioannidis@...>
 

Thanks Steve!

Best regards,
Helen and Kostas

On Monday, July 9, 2018, 9:25:28 PM GMT+3, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

My memory is a little foggy, but I believe I paid $1100.00 total for the pinion and large gear. 

Best Regards,

Steve

On Jul 9, 2018, at 08:13, Kostas Ioannidis kostas_ioannidis@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Steve,

Thanks!
Yes we have spoken to Amel and they said that there are no spare parts, but have sent us the plans to try and have it fixed.
We will check with Emek marine to see if they still have spare parts though.
How expensive were they?

Best regards,
Helen and Kostas


On Monday, July 9, 2018, 8:22:31 PM GMT+3, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Hi Kostas,

Have you checked with Amel to see if they still have them in stock? We were able to purchase the pinion and the gear from Emek Marine in Turkey in 2014. They were a bit expensive, but they seemed to be OEM parts for the furler. 

Good luck with your project. 

Steve
Aloha SM 72
Hawaii

On Jul 9, 2018, at 01:29, Kostas Ioannidis kostas_ioannidis@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi John ,

Thanks very much!!! That’s very encouraging. Perhaps the gear maker here will not have problems either...:)
If he does I’ll get back to you and perhaps contact the gear maker in New Zealand for his ideas.
We have also serviced the main furling gears with the original Italian parts.
Thanks again!!

Best,
Kostas and Helen 

On Monday, July 9, 2018, 2:00:47 PM GMT+3, John Hayes johnhayes862@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Hi Helen and Kostas

 

My Santorin is 1991 and we had the same problem a year ago. We managed (in New Zealand) to get the worm drive machined and then a new disk gear cut. All bearings were also replaced. The cost as I recall was about NZ$2000 or roughly US $1400 which included courier charges. The fellow who did the work had never before seen a fiberglass gear box casing but reckoned the rebuilt box would be good for 25 years!

 

We took the furler gear box to the gear maker; no plans were necessary

 

I have also just replaced the gear boxes on the main furler and boom outhaul. Both about US$ 300 and standard bonfiglioli (sp?) units.

 

Best

 

John Hayes

Nag Waka

Wellington

New Zealand

 

From: <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of "Kostas Ioannidis kostas_ioannidis@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Reply-To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Monday, 9 July 2018 at 10:27 PM
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Genoa electric furling gears

 

 

Dear all,

 

Our electric furling system on our Super Maramu no 29 in 1990 is broken. 

The gears inside are sheared . We had already replaced the bearings inside when it was making some noise a few years ago but this time the mechanical engineer here on Syros island in Greece says that he will need replacement gears as it will be very hard to have new ones cut and probably very expensive.

Has anyone had any experience and does anyone have any ideas to help?

Maud at Amel will send some plans which will help but any other help will be very much appreciated!!

 

Best regards,

Helen and Kostas Yuvanidi sailing on “Meditation “Super Maramu no 29 in 1990


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Genoa electric furling gears

Kostas Ioannidis <kostas_ioannidis@...>
 

Thanks John!!

On Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 12:20:59 AM GMT+3, John Hayes johnhayes862@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

HI KOSTAS AND HELEN

The trick may be to locate someone with a computerised gear cutting equipment. We needed to use two people……..one who had a machine to resurface the worm drive (400 km away in Christchurch)  the second in our town to make a new gear. The other key issue was to find a piece of suitable alloy from which to cut the new gear.

 

Cheers

 

John

 

From: on behalf of "Kostas Ioannidis kostas_ioannidis@... [amelyachtowners]"
Reply-To:
Date: Monday, 9 July 2018 at 11:33 PM
To: "John Hayes johnhayes862@... [amelyachtowners]"
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Genoa electric furling gears

 

 

Hi John ,

 

Thanks very much!!! That’s very encouraging. Perhaps the gear maker here will not have problems either...:)

If he does I’ll get back to you and perhaps contact the gear maker in New Zealand for his ideas.

We have also serviced the main furling gears with the original Italian parts.

Thanks again!!

 

Best,

Kostas and Helen 

 

On Monday, July 9, 2018, 2:00:47 PM GMT+3, John Hayes johnhayes862@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

 

 

Hi Helen and Kostas

 

My Santorin is 1991 and we had the same problem a year ago. We managed (in New Zealand) to get the worm drive machined and then a new disk gear cut. All bearings were also replaced. The cost as I recall was about NZ$2000 or roughly US $1400 which included courier charges. The fellow who did the work had never before seen a fiberglass gear box casing but reckoned the rebuilt box would be good for 25 years!

 

We took the furler gear box to the gear maker; no plans were necessary

 

I have also just replaced the gear boxes on the main furler and boom outhaul. Both about US$ 300 and standard bonfiglioli (sp?) units.

 

Best

 

John Hayes

Nag Waka

Wellington

New Zealand

 

From: on behalf of "Kostas Ioannidis kostas_ioannidis@... [amelyachtowners]"
Reply-To:
Date: Monday, 9 July 2018 at 10:27 PM
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Genoa electric furling gears

 

 

Dear all,

 

Our electric furling system on our Super Maramu no 29 in 1990 is broken. 

The gears inside are sheared . We had already replaced the bearings inside when it was making some noise a few years ago but this time the mechanical engineer here on Syros island in Greece says that he will need replacement gears as it will be very hard to have new ones cut and probably very expensive.

Has anyone had any experience and does anyone have any ideas to help?

Maud at Amel will send some plans which will help but any other help will be very much appreciated!!

 

Best regards,

Helen and Kostas Yuvanidi sailing on “Meditation “Super Maramu no 29 in 1990


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Genoa electric furling gears

Kostas Ioannidis <kostas_ioannidis@...>
 

Hi Leopold,

Thanks!!
It’s 
helenmi57@...

Best Regards,
Helen and Kostas

On Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 8:46:10 AM GMT+3, leopold.hauer@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Hi  Helen and Kostas.

 I had the same problem  in january  this year.  Amel was not able to support with spare parts. Finally I found the parts ( full servicekit with worm-gear  and bronce-wheel , bearings and seals) in switzerland.  The only problem ist,that the wormgear is for a super maramu 2000, that means  the flange  fur the motor drive-shaft is different to older super maramus,  but for a machine shop it is easy to fix.

Please send me a privat mailing address than i give you more details and Photos.

Best regards

Leopold

YinYang   SM#69


Downwind sail for Amel 54

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi all,

We need to replace our 10year old Genaker that died in the Atlantic ocean crossing. 

We are looking for a sail that can:

1. Be poled out opposite to the poled out genoa for 150°-210° downwind sailing (our 54 has the 3 pole attachment mast foot, 1 forward and two side),

2. sustain robust trade winds in that configuration (say up to 18knt apparent wind, 27 true wind). Or in other words such that we can near hull speed before we need to take it down to protect the sail itself. Our Genaker was  old and tired but it always felt a bit too light for the intended purposes,

3. be suitable for furler-emmagasinneur furling (A54 don’t have the SM ballooner setup, sadly)

4. Ideally, could also perform for reaching in light winds. Our hydranet sails are heavy and need 10kn apparent wind to fly properly. In other words, a sail to complement the beloved secret sail (mizzen staysail) in the prevalent conditions (150° to 100° awa).

5. Ideally, survive tropical sun as best as possible,

We spoke to sailmakers and I felt they are not very accustomed to the needs of long term cruising boats with ketch rigging. 

So i’m seeking feedback from the experienced sailors of this group, to see if there is a compromise to these requirements.


Many thanks in advance,


Thomas 
GARULFO 
A54-122
Curacao