Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

Patrick McAneny
 

Mark, Now that I know I can use it on the fresh water side, is this how I would proceed. I would drain all the antifreeze and refill with a 4 to 1 ratio mixture of B/B run the engine until it warms up , shut it down and let it sit for maybe three hours, then flush with water a couple of times. Does that sound about right.
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Thu, Jun 14, 2018 7:16 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

 
Hi Pat,
 
Yes. Use it on both sides. I have use BB on multiple surfaces without issue. However, keep it away from fiberglass – be sure not to spill any.
 
When done, I make up a baking soda solution and dunk the exchanger in it to neutralize any acid. Probably not necessary but I figure it couldn’t hurt.
 
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:23 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster
 
 
Mark, Its not bad ,all the holes are clear, but thought it might clean out stuff from between the tubes. So 4 hrs. and then flush with water to rid the acid. Do you know if it can be used on the fresh water side to clean out rust and small deposits.
Thanks,
Pat
SM#123

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Wed, Jun 13, 2018 8:58 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster
 
Hi Pat,
 
BB will take at least four hours on a mild job. If your heat exchanger is blocked and has a lot of growth, I would suggest taking it to a radiator shop. They will do it for the price of a gal of BB. It should be clean throughout and shiny before you put it back on.
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 8:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster
 
 
I have never used anything like Barnacle Buster and have a question. I took out my heat exchanger and I understand that I can soak it to clean it , but how long? Another question is that the interior surfaces of the fresh water side looks pretty bad . Can I run B/B through my fresh water side to clean it out , if not is there something else to clean out the fresh water side.
Thanks,
Pat
SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

Mark Erdos
 

Hi Pat,

 

Yes. Use it on both sides. I have use BB on multiple surfaces without issue. However, keep it away from fiberglass – be sure not to spill any.

 

When done, I make up a baking soda solution and dunk the exchanger in it to neutralize any acid. Probably not necessary but I figure it couldn’t hurt.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

www.creampuff.us                                                                                   

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:23 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

 

 

Mark, Its not bad ,all the holes are clear, but thought it might clean out stuff from between the tubes. So 4 hrs. and then flush with water to rid the acid. Do you know if it can be used on the fresh water side to clean out rust and small deposits.

Thanks,

Pat

SM#123

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Wed, Jun 13, 2018 8:58 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

 

Hi Pat,

 

BB will take at least four hours on a mild job. If your heat exchanger is blocked and has a lot of growth, I would suggest taking it to a radiator shop. They will do it for the price of a gal of BB. It should be clean throughout and shiny before you put it back on.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 8:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

 

 

I have never used anything like Barnacle Buster and have a question. I took out my heat exchanger and I understand that I can soak it to clean it , but how long? Another question is that the interior surfaces of the fresh water side looks pretty bad . Can I run B/B through my fresh water side to clean it out , if not is there something else to clean out the fresh water side.

Thanks,

Pat

SM#123


Re: Amel SM 2000 stability data

nz free
 

Hello Alin


Congratulations on purchasing Wanderer. She is a wonderful boat and provided my family and I many years of adventure and security. Some of the great memories of my life have been aboard her.


I am not technically the first owner of the boat. But I am the fist owner of the boat. I had her for 10 years, sailed her From Mystic Connecticut to as far west as Sydney Australia and ended up in New Zealand. 


Although I am not happy that she is going to become a day charter boat. She is an ocean thoroughbred she belongs on the high seas. I would be glad to provide you with any help or information that I can.  


Where will you be keeping her?


I don't often check this group. You can contact me at vitoc@...


Thanks


Vito Ciaravino


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

Patrick McAneny
 

Mark, Its not bad ,all the holes are clear, but thought it might clean out stuff from between the tubes. So 4 hrs. and then flush with water to rid the acid. Do you know if it can be used on the fresh water side to clean out rust and small deposits.
Thanks,
Pat
SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Wed, Jun 13, 2018 8:58 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

 
Hi Pat,
 
BB will take at least four hours on a mild job. If your heat exchanger is blocked and has a lot of growth, I would suggest taking it to a radiator shop. They will do it for the price of a gal of BB. It should be clean throughout and shiny before you put it back on.
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 8:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster
 
 
I have never used anything like Barnacle Buster and have a question. I took out my heat exchanger and I understand that I can soak it to clean it , but how long? Another question is that the interior surfaces of the fresh water side looks pretty bad . Can I run B/B through my fresh water side to clean it out , if not is there something else to clean out the fresh water side.
Thanks,
Pat
SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

Mark Erdos
 

Hi Pat,

 

BB will take at least four hours on a mild job. If your heat exchanger is blocked and has a lot of growth, I would suggest taking it to a radiator shop. They will do it for the price of a gal of BB. It should be clean throughout and shiny before you put it back on.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 8:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Barnacle Buster

 

 

I have never used anything like Barnacle Buster and have a question. I took out my heat exchanger and I understand that I can soak it to clean it , but how long? Another question is that the interior surfaces of the fresh water side looks pretty bad . Can I run B/B through my fresh water side to clean it out , if not is there something else to clean out the fresh water side.

Thanks,

Pat

SM#123


Barnacle Buster

Patrick McAneny
 

I have never used anything like Barnacle Buster and have a question. I took out my heat exchanger and I understand that I can soak it to clean it , but how long? Another question is that the interior surfaces of the fresh water side looks pretty bad . Can I run B/B through my fresh water side to clean it out , if not is there something else to clean out the fresh water side.

Thanks,

Pat

SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

 

Good eye! Yes, there are blisters on the cast iron ballast, probably caused by the the cast iron ballast being separated from the bonding system with the most likely cause being the bonding strap in the Gray Water Bilge.
 
Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970






On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 6:34 PM 'hanspeter.baettig@...' hanspeter.baettig@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

hello Bode
your zink anode on the propeller looks good
but whats about the bubbels on your keel/ ballst
looks not good
Hanspeter
Tamango 2
SM16

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 13.06.2018 um 06:39 schrieb steve@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

This is the zinc that was on there. Anyone know what the replacement is?

-Bode


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117) [1 Attachment]

hanspeter baettig
 

hello Bode
your zink anode on the propeller looks good
but whats about the bubbels on your keel/ ballst
looks not good
Hanspeter
Tamango 2
SM16

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 13.06.2018 um 06:39 schrieb steve@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

This is the zinc that was on there. Anyone know what the replacement is?

-Bode


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

karkauai
 

The prop zinc for a MaxProp has very narrow bridges of zinc around the bolts.  When they go the rest of the zinc will fall off. I paint those bridges with an enamel paint and they last five times as long. The original zincs on my rudder were 5 inches in diameter, I am now using 7 inch diameter zincs from Camp.  My hull potential is better, and they last much longer.

A diver turned me onto Camp zincs when I had the problem with electrolysis of my prop shaft. You may have noticed that the Martyr zincs from West Marine erode unevenly, with big pits in some places and little eroded in others. Apparently this is due to inadequate mixing of the alloy. Camp sinks erode much more evenly.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM243

On Jun 13, 2018, at 2:17 AM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi ASteve,


Looks like you have a 3 blade maxprop...

This link should help you decide what you think you need...and you can probably get it cheaper from somewhere else.



I'm confused by what you mean by the "plate" zinc....are you talking about the rectangular plate on the side of the rudder?..if so that's not a zinc, its the ground plate for the SSB radio.

If your rudder zincs are fine, but the prop zinc isn't you may have a bonding issue...the rudder zincs should be decaying....in fact you shouldn't need the prop zinc if your bonding system is all good.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 Musket Cove, Fiji


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

Craig Briggs
 


James,
If some bolts won't come out and have never been removed before it seems likely there has not been water ingress - they're just being uncooperative and can wait for you to get back to your shop for better tools. If you're concerned, I'd treat them with Captain Tolley's (Amazing) Creeping Crack Cure - great product.

I had the embedded plate of the port side aft-most stanchion get wet after the original GPS antenna cable was removed along with the silicon Amel had sealed it with. After many years the rusting plate swelled up and cracked the toe rail open. A few years ago I cut out the old plate, replaced it and re-glassed the toe rail, which now looks like new. This can also be an issue if you rewire the bow lights.

Others have reported swelling in the SM engine-room hatch cover supports (I think BebeBill was the first to post about it). Don't recall any issues reported about the genoa track rail bolts, which I believe you're working on.

Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Craig,

   Thanks for the advice and information on how you dealt with the bolts on your boat that are tapped into the embedded plates, that was very helpful to me! 

   I will definitely take Joel’s advice on sealing and using new bolts.  I have read about the problems that can occur if water gets to the backing plates and I certainly want to avoid that if at all possible.  My thoughts are to remove any of the rail bolts that I can get out easily and replace/reseal those as soon as I can.    The remainder that are  difficult to remove will have to wait until I get Sueño back to my shop in Florida.  I am wondering if there are any options to help prevent water ingress on the fasteners that I cannot easily remove?

   Best of luck to you and your project.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220


    

On Jun 12, 2018, at 8:51 PM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

My experience was some bolts were easily removed, others really stubborn. After trying BIG screwdriver with square shaft and a wrench on that to add to torque, the ultimate solution for the ones that got "buggered" was to weld a short hex head bolt onto the flat slotted head of the stanchion bolt and put a socket wrench on that - easy peasy removal.

Do take Joel's advice to heart to be SURE you seal the new/replaced bolts totally. This forum has many reports of the embedded carbon steel backing plates corroding and some bursting open - believe me, it's a BIG fiberglass repair job to cut out the old plates and rebuild the fiberglass and gel coat.
Good luck with it!
Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Gary,

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hi Bill


I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.







Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 160 - AC Motor for High Pressure Pump

Heinz Stutenbaeumer
 

Hello 
The engine of my water maker Desselator Duo 160 l is defective. 
I wrote to the manufacturer and they really want 1350,00 Euro + 750,00 Euro for the transport to Pannama. 
I think that's an outrage. 
Can someone tell me what I need for an engine, so I can get a similar one. Unfortunately, no type designation can be recognized on my motor. 
Thanks in advance 

Fair winds 

Heinz Stutenbāumer
Quetzal, SM2000,292



Am 06.06.2018 um 07:33 schrieb pstas2003 <no_reply@...>:

 

Heinz,

Thank you very much for sharing that information.  It is most helpful,

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
Fort Louis Marina - Saint Martin


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

James Alton
 

Craig,

   Thanks for the advice and information on how you dealt with the bolts on your boat that are tapped into the embedded plates, that was very helpful to me! 

   I will definitely take Joel’s advice on sealing and using new bolts.  I have read about the problems that can occur if water gets to the backing plates and I certainly want to avoid that if at all possible.  My thoughts are to remove any of the rail bolts that I can get out easily and replace/reseal those as soon as I can.    The remainder that are  difficult to remove will have to wait until I get Sueño back to my shop in Florida.  I am wondering if there are any options to help prevent water ingress on the fasteners that I cannot easily remove?

   Best of luck to you and your project.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220


    

On Jun 12, 2018, at 8:51 PM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

My experience was some bolts were easily removed, others really stubborn. After trying BIG screwdriver with square shaft and a wrench on that to add to torque, the ultimate solution for the ones that got "buggered" was to weld a short hex head bolt onto the flat slotted head of the stanchion bolt and put a socket wrench on that - easy peasy removal.

Do take Joel's advice to heart to be SURE you seal the new/replaced bolts totally. This forum has many reports of the embedded carbon steel backing plates corroding and some bursting open - believe me, it's a BIG fiberglass repair job to cut out the old plates and rebuild the fiberglass and gel coat.
Good luck with it!
Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris.


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Gary,

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hi Bill


I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.







Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

Alan Leslie
 

Hi ASteve,

Looks like you have a 3 blade maxprop...

This link should help you decide what you think you need...and you can probably get it cheaper from somewhere else.



I'm confused by what you mean by the "plate" zinc....are you talking about the rectangular plate on the side of the rudder?..if so that's not a zinc, its the ground plate for the SSB radio.

If your rudder zincs are fine, but the prop zinc isn't you may have a bonding issue...the rudder zincs should be decaying....in fact you shouldn't need the prop zinc if your bonding system is all good.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 Musket Cove, Fiji


Re: Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117
 

This is the zinc that was on there. Anyone know what the replacement is?
-Bode


Zincs for 1994 SM (#117)

Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117
 

Who knows the specs of the zincs for the 1994 SM? Intention has no prop or plate zinc left. Curiously, the rudder zinc looks fine. I'm leaving to go to sea for two days and need to procure these in Palermo, Italy and don't know where to look up which ones to buy. Happy to hire a diver to install them, but need the zincs in hand I believe.
Steve Bode
Sailing Vessel Intention
Amel Super Maramu 1994 #117
Facebook.com/svIntention
+1 415-710-6659


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

Craig Briggs
 

My experience was some bolts were easily removed, others really stubborn. After trying BIG screwdriver with square shaft and a wrench on that to add to torque, the ultimate solution for the ones that got "buggered" was to weld a short hex head bolt onto the flat slotted head of the stanchion bolt and put a socket wrench on that - easy peasy removal.
Do take Joel's advice to heart to be SURE you seal the new/replaced bolts totally. This forum has many reports of the embedded carbon steel backing plates corroding and some bursting open - believe me, it's a BIG fiberglass repair job to cut out the old plates and rebuild the fiberglass and gel coat.
Good luck with it!
Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Gary,

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hi Bill


I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

Mike Ondra
 

 

Trying again

From: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 5:39 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal [1 Attachment]

 

 

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

Attached is a sketch that came with Aletes showing the toe rail cross section and bolt-backplate configuration.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

From: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 8:38 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

 

 

Gary,

 

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

 

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

 

James Alton

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Hi Bill

 

I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

 

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

 

Sincerely, 

 

Gary S. Silver

s/v Liahona

Amel SM 2000 #335

currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

 

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

Mike Ondra
 

Attached is a sketch that came with Aletes showing the toe rail cross section and bolt-backplate configuration.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

From: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 8:38 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

 

 

Gary,

 

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

 

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

 

James Alton

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Hi Bill

 

I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

 

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

 

Sincerely, 

 

Gary S. Silver

s/v Liahona

Amel SM 2000 #335

currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

 

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.

 

 

 

 


Re: FW: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

pacificcool@...
 

Thanks much for the info!  
Bill Shaproski


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lifeline Stanchion Removal

James Alton
 

Gary,

  Thanks for the information.  I am curious about what percentage of the bolts you were able to extract from the embedded bar stock?  Also what technique for removal of the fasteners seemed to work the best for you?

   Best of luck with the rest of your hurricane repairs.

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Jun 12, 2018, at 1:54 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hi Bill


I echo what Joel and others have said but with a few caveats.  I just had about 10 of my stanchions off for repairs following hurricane damage.  Most are attached with the threaded-into-embedded-bar stock method but those in the immediate vicinity of the aft "garage" lazarette had washers and nuts on the back side of the vertical face of the toe-rail and the top horizontal face of the toe-rail.   This included the three most aft stanchions on the starboard stern area.  I didn't have damage on the port side in that area and so I can't speak to that (plus the propane locker is in that area so you'll have to  inspect in that area for nuts if that is where your damage is).  

I had always assumed that the stanchion that has the outboard rail board on it was welded at the top rail and the block was fabricate in-situ but not so.  That stanchion is about 1.5 inches sh ort of going to the top rail and inserts in a hole that is about 75% of the depth of the the wooden block. 

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000 #335
currently completing hurricane repairs at Island Marine, Inc, Puerto Del Rey, Puerto Rico

PS I have a son who is a certified welder so I have been taught a lot about quality welding by him.  The guys that did my stainless repairs were highly skilled and true professionals.  Besides fabricating and installing a 10 ft section of rail and stanchions (done off the boat after tack welding everything on the boat, they weld repaired some broken bales on the underside of the stanchions that retain the jib-sheet-car traveler line.  They did this by removing the stanchion base screws, flexing the lifeline about an inch away from the toe-rail, putting protective metal plating between the fibergla ss and the work piece and TIG welding the bale-to-base, upside down, in close quarters while laying on the deck.  Amazing work.  I can't believe the results of all their work.  Perfect in every way.