Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

Paul Osterberg
 

Danny!
My "old" Genoa is less than 2 years so it still has a few miles left. but I agree with you that a poor 150% can give less performance than a good 100%, have experienced that a few times on previous boats . I will continue with my "old" Genoa cruising North towards Nova Scotia this summer, then decide upon action before heading down to the Caribbean this fall.
Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259


Correction rigging the jordan series drogue

eric freedman
 

-----Original Message-----
From: sailormon [mailto:kimberlite@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 15, 2018 4:03 PM
To: 'James Cromie'; 'amelyachtowners@...'
Subject: rigging the jordan series drogue

Hi James,
I had my drogue bridles made with large loops spliced into the bitter ends.
When I had Kimberlite made I had Amel add strong backing under the stern cleats. I rig the drogue attached to these cleats with the loops.
If you did not get yours with loops spliced in, I would call Dave and ask if he will swap out the bridles with you.

After the cleats the bridle runs through the fairleads with leather chafe gear attached and tied in place with a number of zip ties. They then run between the backstays with chafe gear attached where the bridle runs past the backstays..

The boat might set at an angle to the waves, but the bridles cannot be adjusted with rolling hitches.
This is because the bridle start bending the backstays.
I am working on some way to pull the bridles more inboard.
I run the bridles there as I do not want the bridle to take out the SB antenna.
I was thinking of moving the ssb antenna.

Before deploying , I attach the bridles to the cleats and fairleads with chafe gear attached.. I flake out the entire drogue on the aft cabin top and make sure that there is no kink or overlap . I then ask the crew if everything looks ok.
I then drop the chain over the side between the backstays and feed out a few feet of the drogue. It then self deploys. Once the drogue is set , I then attach chafe gear to the bridle at the backstays. From memory my chafe gear is about 20 inches long.

I also fabricated a rounded box that fits over one fairlead. It is made out of wood and bolts through the fairlead. When retrieving the drogue, the fairlead will tear up the parachutes. The drogue wants to get in the fairlead no matter what I do. You only need one as when it is time to bring the drogue on board, you tie a rolling hitch to remove the bridle. You tighten the hitch with a winch and release it from the cleat. Once it is off you walk to the stern and bring the loose bridle over to the working bridle with the rolling hitch line and bring it on board.

The primary winch will bring the drogue on board. However you have to run it for a minute or so then stop and allow the motor to cool for a minute or two. Otherwise, the motor will overheat and the motors thermal overload switch will shut it down. You then will need to wait till the motor STOPS OVERHEATING *** CORRECTION

Bringing the drogue on board is a 3 person job. One to guide the drogue on board. One to tail the winch, and one to press the winch button. Be very careful with the winch's tailing horn. It will tear up the parachutes.

If the boat is rolling port to starboard you can bring the drogue in without using the electric part of the winch. When the boat rolls, hand tighten the drogue on the winch. When the boat rolls back, and you have slack, pull It in again. If the boat is rolling this works very quickly.

Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376


-----Original Message-----
From: James Cromie [mailto:jamescromie@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:16 PM
To: eric
Subject: rigging the jordan series drogue

Eric - Considering that you have deployed your Jordan drogue a few times on your Amel in heavy weather, I’m interested to know the rigging system that you’ve found to work best.
I’m eager to hear of any tips or advice you might have. I know that one of the biggest causes of failure would be chafe.

Best,
James


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Water coming through below rudder quadrant

eric freedman
 

Steve,

When you get the new nut from Amel, I would take it to a machine shop with a photo of mine. Make sure you measure the maximum length of the wrench that is needed. If the machine shop takes more than 30 minutes to make the wrench it is too long. It is cut out with a band saw and rounded on a bench grinder. I am not happy with the slip, basin- adjustable wrench for this purpose. I am sure with a properly fitting wrench you will be able to at least make the 1/6 turn and possibly 1/8th.

The basin wrench was not made for the force that is needed, it slips and  mars the nut.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 15, 2018 9:50 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Water coming through below rudder quadrant

 

 

Thanks all for the replies. I found that the previous owner left me a slip nut tool and wouldn’t you know it, it was tightened to exactly the width I needed for the packing but. 

I was only able to get a further 1/12th of a turn before I feared I would do more damage than good if I went further. Hopefully this improves things, but also seems to indicate I would do well to contact Maud and get the right parts to repack it. As I could not advance it a full 1/6th, I was unable to screw down the stainless L-plate so hopefully it does not have a propensity for rapidly coming undone. 

All the best,
Steve Morrison
SM380 TouRai
Ft. Lauderdale. 

 


On Apr 15, 2018, at 9:35 PM, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

FYI; Amel sells the tool at a very reasonable cost. We had a custom one made in Turkey for about 100 euros and also bought one from Amel as a backup for less. I don't remember exactly how much.

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad & Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54


On Apr 15, 2018, at 8:17 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

We also had a bit of water come in during our first sailing season, up in Canada.  We hoped to get back to Fort Lauderdale in December and have our regular Amel specialist have a look at it.  But the problem worsened on our way S and finally in Georgetown, SC, we felt compelled to let a non-Amel party have a look at it.

The guys a Hazzard Marine were surprised to find a boat with packing on the steering system, but quickly got to work.  It took two very big strong guys, several tools, and a lot of effort over several hours to pull out the old packing, but they put new one (BROWN in color, made of a natural fiber), tightened the nut, and we carried on.  For the first few days, not a drop leaked, but by the time we got home, the leak  was again excessive.

On Eric's (Kimberlite) advice, we ordered new packing from La Rochelle, plus spares, and an extra nut, just in case we ever crack the old one.  Like Eric says, tape it near the quadrant.  Two things: first, the French packing is WHITE, and made out of a synthetic material.  Second, the Amel original is ***metric***, whereas the South Carolina guys put in an Imperial-size equivalent, or whatever it is called... this is why their efforts were good for only a few weeks.

As for the tool, the ideal is to have one custom-made as per Eric's recommendation, but not having access to that, we took the new plastic nut to a tool specialist in Ft. L who sold us a sufficiently flat, adjustable, $75 Ridgid wrench which one is able to rotate under the quadrant to tighten the nut.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K #350 (2002)
At anchor, La Maddalena, Sardinia


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Water coming through below rudder quadrant

Stephen Morrison <steve_morrison@...>
 

Thanks all for the replies. I found that the previous owner left me a slip nut tool and wouldn’t you know it, it was tightened to exactly the width I needed for the packing but. 

I was only able to get a further 1/12th of a turn before I feared I would do more damage than good if I went further. Hopefully this improves things, but also seems to indicate I would do well to contact Maud and get the right parts to repack it. As I could not advance it a full 1/6th, I was unable to screw down the stainless L-plate so hopefully it does not have a propensity for rapidly coming undone. 

All the best,
Steve Morrison
SM380 TouRai
Ft. Lauderdale. 


On Apr 15, 2018, at 9:35 PM, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

FYI; Amel sells the tool at a very reasonable cost. We had a custom one made in Turkey for about 100 euros and also bought one from Amel as a backup for less. I don't remember exactly how much.

Respectfully;


Mohammad & Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54

On Apr 15, 2018, at 8:17 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

We also had a bit of water come in during our first sailing season, up in Canada.  We hoped to get back to Fort Lauderdale in December and have our regular Amel specialist have a look at it.  But the problem worsened on our way S and finally in Georgetown, SC, we felt compelled to let a non-Amel party have a look at it.

The guys a Hazzard Marine were surprised to find a boat with packing on the steering system, but quickly got to work.  It took two very big strong guys, several tools, and a lot of effort over several hours to pull out the old packing, but they put new one (BROWN in color, made of a natural fiber), tightened the nut, and we carried on.  For the first few days, not a drop leaked, but by the time we got home, the leak  was again excessive.

On Eric's (Kimberlite) advice, we ordered new packing from La Rochelle, plus spares, and an extra nut, just in case we ever crack the old one.  Like Eric says, tape it near the quadrant.  Two things: first, the French packing is WHITE, and made out of a synthetic material.  Second, the Amel original is ***metric***, whereas the South Carolina guys put in an Imperial-size equivalent, or whatever it is called... this is why their efforts were good for only a few weeks.

As for the tool, the ideal is to have one custom-made as per Eric's recommendation, but not having access to that, we took the new plastic nut to a tool specialist in Ft. L who sold us a sufficiently flat, adjustable, $75 Ridgid wrench which one is able to rotate under the quadrant to tighten the nut.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K #350 (2002)
At anchor, La Maddalena, Sardinia


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Water coming through below rudder quadrant

Mohammad Shirloo
 

FYI; Amel sells the tool at a very reasonable cost. We had a custom one made in Turkey for about 100 euros and also bought one from Amel as a backup for less. I don't remember exactly how much.

Respectfully;


Mohammad & Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54

On Apr 15, 2018, at 8:17 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

We also had a bit of water come in during our first sailing season, up in Canada.  We hoped to get back to Fort Lauderdale in December and have our regular Amel specialist have a look at it.  But the problem worsened on our way S and finally in Georgetown, SC, we felt compelled to let a non-Amel party have a look at it.

The guys a Hazzard Marine were surprised to find a boat with packing on the steering system, but quickly got to work.  It took two very big strong guys, several tools, and a lot of effort over several hours to pull out the old packing, but they put new one (BROWN in color, made of a natural fiber), tightened the nut, and we carried on.  For the first few days, not a drop leaked, but by the time we got home, the leak  was again excessive.

On Eric's (Kimberlite) advice, we ordered new packing from La Rochelle, plus spares, and an extra nut, just in case we ever crack the old one.  Like Eric says, tape it near the quadrant.  Two things: first, the French packing is WHITE, and made out of a synthetic material.  Second, the Amel original is ***metric***, whereas the South Carolina guys put in an Imperial-size equivalent, or whatever it is called... this is why their efforts were good for only a few weeks.

As for the tool, the ideal is to have one custom-made as per Eric's recommendation, but not having access to that, we took the new plastic nut to a tool specialist in Ft. L who sold us a sufficiently flat, adjustable, $75 Ridgid wrench which one is able to rotate under the quadrant to tighten the nut.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K #350 (2002)
At anchor, La Maddalena, Sardinia


Re: Water coming through below rudder quadrant

greatketch@...
 

Surprised by packing on a rudder shaft???? That's... surprising!  It's certainly not an unusual situation, LOTS of boats have it.  Mixing up imperial and metric sizes are good for lots, and lots of problems.

Guess those guys didn't see too many sailboats... makes me wonder if they actually knew how to cut and fit the packing into the gland... there are an awful lot more wrong ways to do it than right ones.

Pretty much any decent chandlery will have the adjustable packing nut wrench.  A good hardware store will have it in the plumbing section for nuts on sink and toilet drains.  Plumbers call them "slip wrenches."  It is thin enough and short handled enough it does fit on our rudder gland.  I am not usually a fan of adjustable wrenches, but if you have to tighten this nut so tight that becomes an issue, the gland needs repacking.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas


Re: Water coming through below rudder quadrant

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

We also had a bit of water come in during our first sailing season, up in Canada.  We hoped to get back to Fort Lauderdale in December and have our regular Amel specialist have a look at it.  But the problem worsened on our way S and finally in Georgetown, SC, we felt compelled to let a non-Amel party have a look at it.

The guys a Hazzard Marine were surprised to find a boat with packing on the steering system, but quickly got to work.  It took two very big strong guys, several tools, and a lot of effort over several hours to pull out the old packing, but they put new one (BROWN in color, made of a natural fiber), tightened the nut, and we carried on.  For the first few days, not a drop leaked, but by the time we got home, the leak  was again excessive.

On Eric's (Kimberlite) advice, we ordered new packing from La Rochelle, plus spares, and an extra nut, just in case we ever crack the old one.  Like Eric says, tape it near the quadrant.  Two things: first, the French packing is WHITE, and made out of a synthetic material.  Second, the Amel original is ***metric***, whereas the South Carolina guys put in an Imperial-size equivalent, or whatever it is called... this is why their efforts were good for only a few weeks.

As for the tool, the ideal is to have one custom-made as per Eric's recommendation, but not having access to that, we took the new plastic nut to a tool specialist in Ft. L who sold us a sufficiently flat, adjustable, $75 Ridgid wrench which one is able to rotate under the quadrant to tighten the nut.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K #350 (2002)
At anchor, La Maddalena, Sardinia


Re: 2nd. Autopilot on AMEL-54

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

We have two separate autopilot computers and two separate autopilot drives.  

Each computer output goes to a rotary switch so you can select if you wish to use the Raytheon T-300 autopilot computer or if you wish to use the B&G AC42 computer.

The output from that switch then goes into an identical rotary switch so you can select if you wish to use the Raymarine rotary drive or the Raymarine linear drive.

Because of the two rotary switches, you can use the B&G autopilot with either the rotary or the linear drive, and you can use the Raytheon autopilot with the rotary or the linear drive as well.

Key to having two separate systems is that each system has its own sensors.  Otherwise, if both systems use the same sensors and they go down... then both computers will be disabled.  So the B&G is on a NMEA 2000 network and has access to the boat's NMEA 2000 heading sensor, wind sensor, GPS, autopilot controls and displays, and its own rudder position sensor.  The Raytheon has access to the NMEA 2000 network data, but in its absence, it can perfectly steer to a magnetic target because it has its own dedicated gyro, compass, rudder sensor, and its own keypad and display, as well as a Raymarine SmartController wireless remote control.  When the NMEA 2000 net is disabled, the Raytheon in our configuration loses the ability to autopilot to a wind angle because we discarded the boat's factory original Raymarine wind sensor.

In the aft quadrant the Amel factory already had the Raymarine rudder sensor occupying one side of the quadrant.  The B&G rudder sensor was installed upside down (reversed) on the other side of the quadrant, and fortunately there is a setting in the software for exactly this situation.


Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K Nr. 350 (2002)
At anchor, La Maddalena, Sardinia


Re: 2nd. Autopilot on AMEL-54

greatketch@...
 

Ruedi,

I can not comment on the specifics of a AMEL54 installation, but I have some general comments for you.  

A backup drive is an excellent idea.  Even the best mechanical stuff has a finite life span, and can fail without warning.  Hand steering for days on end when you have a small crew is not my idea of fun.  Been there--done that--do not need to do it again.

On my old boat I had an Octopus Hydraulic autopilot drive installed that was a backup to a wind vane. When the hydraulic unit was not being used it added NO noticeable load on the steering system.  It would be compatible with any other type of unit.  

Key on the installation of any ram style AP drive is making sure it has a good, solid structure to push against.  In general, it is not a good idea to have a AP drive attached directly to the quadrant that the wheel uses.  In the very unlikely event of a problem with the quadrant, the AP is a backup to the wheel if it is connected to a separate tiller arm.  I do not know how complex such an addition would be to a 54. You'll have three separate steering systems, the wheel, the linear drive and the hydraulic drive. The fewer parts they have in common, the more reliable the whole system will be.

In my experience hydraulic AP drives tend to make a LOT more noise than the linear drive. Mounting the pump remotely (in the engine room?) will help, but you'll still notice a lot more noise. That probably changes when you get to units with continuously running pumps, but that is likely not suitable for a 54. 

Good luck!
Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@..., <Rudolf@...> wrote :

Hi everyone (and Amel-54 owners),

Since few month I’m a happy owner of an Amel-54. We plan to go long distance (cross oceans), and I think its a good idea to have a second Autopilot. Our A-54 is from 2007 with one electric Raymarine AP (I think linear drive). 

We plan to add an independent Raymarin autopilot system with hydraulic ram. If you have any experience with two AP and especially similar configurations (one electric one hydraulic), I'd like to know your experience.

I’m very interested to know your layout on the rudder quadrant and how you have installed everything.
If you have any pictures how the "AP-RAM" are installaed, I would love to see. 

Further: Did it worked well, or you had issues with it? 
Was the linear drive still able to turn the rudder with the extra load?
Does it turned out as a wise investment?

Thanks for any advice and kind regards

Ruedi Waldispuehl

SY Wasabi 



Sorry Error rigging the jordan series drogue

eric freedman
 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 15, 2018 4:03 PM
To: 'James Cromie'; amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] rigging the jordan series drogue

 

 

Hi James,
I had my drogue bridles made with large loops spliced into the bitter ends.
When I had Kimberlite made I had Amel add strong backing under the stern cleats. I rig the drogue attached to these cleats with the loops.
If you did not get yours with loops spliced in, I would call Dave and ask if he will swap out the bridles with you.

After the cleats the bridle runs through the fairleads with leather chafe gear attached and tied in place with a number of zip ties. They then run between the backstays with chafe gear attached where the bridle runs past the backstays..

The boat might set at an angle to the waves, but the bridles cannot be adjusted with rolling hitches.
This is because the bridle start bending the backstays.
I am working on some way to pull the bridles more inboard.
I run the bridles there as I do not want the bridle to take out the SB antenna.
I was thinking of moving the ssb antenna.

Before deploying , I attach the bridles to the cleats and fairleads with chafe gear attached.. I flake out the entire drogue on the aft cabin top and make sure that there is no kink or overlap . I then ask the crew if everything looks ok.
I then drop the chain over the side between the backstays and feed out a few feet of the drogue. It then self deploys. Once the drogue is set , I then attach chafe gear to the bridle at the backstays. From memory my chafe gear is about 20 inches long.

I also fabricated a rounded box that fits over one fairlead. It is made out of wood and bolts through the
fairlead. When retrieving the drogue, the fairlead will tear up the parachutes. The drogue wants to get in the fairlead no matter what I do. You only need one as when it is time to bring the drogue on board, you tie a rolling hitch to remove the bridle. You tighten the hitch with a winch and release it from the cleat. Once it is off you walk to the stern and bring the loose bridle over to the working bridle with the rolling hitch line and bring it on board.

The primary winch will bring the drogue on board. However you have to run it for a minute or so then stop and allow the motor to cool for a minute or two. Otherwise, the motor will overheat and the motors thermal overload switch will shut it down. You then will need to wait till the motor  cools off  .

Bringing the drogue on board is a 3 person job. One to guide the drogue on board. One to tail the winch, and one to press the winch button. Be very careful with the winch's tailing horn. It will tear up the parachutes.

If the boat is rolling port to starboard you can bring the drogue in without using the electric part of the winch. When the boat rolls, hand tighten the drogue on the winch. When the boat rolls back, and you have slack, pull
it in again. If the boat is rolling this works very quickly.

Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

-----Original Message-----
From: James Cromie [mailto:jamescromie@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:16 PM
To: eric
Subject: rigging the jordan series drogue

Eric - Considering that you have deployed your Jordan drogue a few times on your Amel in heavy weather, I’m interested to know the rigging system that you’ve found to work best.
I’m eager to hear of any tips or advice you might have. I know that one of the biggest causes of failure would be chafe.

Best,
James


rigging the jordan series drogue

eric freedman
 

Hi James,
I had my drogue bridles made with large loops spliced into the bitter ends.
When I had Kimberlite made I had Amel add strong backing under the stern cleats. I rig the drogue attached to these cleats with the loops.
If you did not get yours with loops spliced in, I would call Dave and ask if he will swap out the bridles with you.

After the cleats the bridle runs through the fairleads with leather chafe gear attached and tied in place with a number of zip ties. They then run between the backstays with chafe gear attached where the bridle runs past the backstays..

The boat might set at an angle to the waves, but the bridles cannot be adjusted with rolling hitches.
This is because the bridle start bending the backstays.
I am working on some way to pull the bridles more inboard.
I run the bridles there as I do not want the bridle to take out the SB antenna.
I was thinking of moving the ssb antenna.

Before deploying , I attach the bridles to the cleats and fairleads with chafe gear attached.. I flake out the entire drogue on the aft cabin top and make sure that there is no kink or overlap . I then ask the crew if everything looks ok.
I then drop the chain over the side between the backstays and feed out a few feet of the drogue. It then self deploys. Once the drogue is set , I then attach chafe gear to the bridle at the backstays. From memory my chafe gear is about 20 inches long.

I also fabricated a rounded box that fits over one fairlead. It is made out of wood and bolts through the
fairlead. When retrieving the drogue, the fairlead will tear up the parachutes. The drogue wants to get in the fairlead no matter what I do. You only need one as when it is time to bring the drogue on board, you tie a rolling hitch to remove the bridle. You tighten the hitch with a winch and release it from the cleat. Once it is off you walk to the stern and bring the loose bridle over to the working bridle with the rolling hitch line and bring it on board.

The primary winch will bring the drogue on board. However you have to run it for a minute or so then stop and allow the motor to cool for a minute or two. Otherwise, the motor will overheat and the motors thermal overload switch will shut it down. You then will need to wait till the motor overheats.

Bringing the drogue on board is a 3 person job. One to guide the drogue on board. One to tail the winch, and one to press the winch button. Be very careful with the winch's tailing horn. It will tear up the parachutes.

If the boat is rolling port to starboard you can bring the drogue in without using the electric part of the winch. When the boat rolls, hand tighten the drogue on the winch. When the boat rolls back, and you have slack, pull
It in again. If the boat is rolling this works very quickly.

Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

-----Original Message-----
From: James Cromie [mailto:jamescromie@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:16 PM
To: eric
Subject: rigging the jordan series drogue

Eric - Considering that you have deployed your Jordan drogue a few times on your Amel in heavy weather, I’m interested to know the rigging system that you’ve found to work best.
I’m eager to hear of any tips or advice you might have. I know that one of the biggest causes of failure would be chafe.

Best,
James


2nd. Autopilot on AMEL-54

Rudolf Waldispuehl
 

Hi everyone (and Amel-54 owners),

Since few month I’m a happy owner of an Amel-54. We plan to go long distance (cross oceans), and I think its a good idea to have a second Autopilot. Our A-54 is from 2007 with one electric Raymarine AP (I think linear drive). 

We plan to add an independent Raymarin autopilot system with hydraulic ram. If you have any experience with two AP and especially similar configurations (one electric one hydraulic), I'd like to know your experience.

I’m very interested to know your layout on the rudder quadrant and how you have installed everything.
If you have any pictures how the "AP-RAM" are installaed, I would love to see. 

Further: Did it worked well, or you had issues with it? 
Was the linear drive still able to turn the rudder with the extra load?
Does it turned out as a wise investment?

Thanks for any advice and kind regards

Ruedi Waldispuehl

SY Wasabi 



back light replacement on analogue B&G display

John Clark
 

HI All,

   the back light on my B&G depth instrument at the helm has stopped working.  IT is getting power and the instrument next to it (wind angle) which is connected to the same light power is working fine. 


I opened the nut in the center of the back of the instrument but did not see any obvious light bulb that can be replaced.  Does anyone have any insight on how to change a light bulb?  



               Regards,  John


SV Annie SM 37

Georgetown Exuma, hoping to depart for USVI in 36 hrs....maybe


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Water coming through below rudder quadrant

eric freedman
 

Sorry,

I get it from Amel, it is precut at an angle ,

I would order 2 sets and 2 nuts just in case.

Sorry but I am not on Kimberlite.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 15, 2018 12:35 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Water coming through below rudder quadrant

 

 

Eric (or anybody)

 

Do you know the size of the packing used in the rudder post?

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Water coming through below rudder quadrant

greatketch@...
 

Eric (or anybody)

Do you know the size of the packing used in the rudder post?

Bill Kinney
SM160, Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Water coming through below rudder quadrant

eric freedman
 

Hi Steve,

I am writing you back channel so I can send you the attached photo.

Sounds like you need to tighten up the packing nut.

Unfortunately you need a big wrench to do that thin with a short handle.

This is a wrench I cut out of a ¼ inch piece of aluminum stock.

Unfortunately I am not on the boat.

 

There is an L shaped bracket held in with 2 screws, Just remove the screws and tighten the nut.

It might take some force as the packing is tight. Be careful as the nut screws into fiberglass !!

 

If you can’t tighten it you might have to you can change the packing with the boat in the water. If your boat is sitting low in the stern you can remove the first 2 layers of packing and then you will need someone with a wet vac to remove the water as you install the packing. If your boat is not low it is easier. Make sure to grease the packing before installing. I use a piece of pvc pipe to drive down the packing. It is the same size that I use on the lip seals on the prop shaft.

 

If you cannot make a wrench, remove the rudder stock and use some other form of wrench.

If you mar the nut you can order another one from Maud. I keep a spare nut and packing Duct taped  near the quadrant.

 

If the quadrant has been leaking it is probably rusted.

It is best to clean it up and paint it with rust bullet. Unfortunately you cannot paint the inside of the quadrant as it makes an electrical contact for the bonding.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2018 9:49 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Water coming through below rudder quadrant

 

 

Hello all. After avoiding the Berries all season because it just seemed too shallow with limited protection, I made a pass through it 2 days ago, and promptly found myself aground trying to turn around in a seeming dead end of a proclaimed “safe anchorage for one or two boats in an East wind.

Apart from being stuck for twenty minutes or so, I discovered later that evening that I had water under the aft bunk and pulled roughly a gallon out of the low space under the quadrant. This evening, after crossing Bimini to Ft Lauderdale, I pulled about the same out, to make it twice in the last two days.

I have never noticed water there before, though as I look now, I see a staining that has been there for quite some time, likely longer than the 18 months I’ve owned the boat, and so perhaps others have had issues with water getting through the packing and coming out the top of the fiberglass rudder sleeve.

With my phone I see what looks like a packing but below the quadrant. Have any of you dealt with an issue such as this?

All the best,
Steve Morrison
Sm 380, TouRai
Ft Lauderdale


Water coming through below rudder quadrant

steve_morrison@...
 

Hello all. After avoiding the Berries all season because it just seemed too shallow with limited protection, I made a pass through it 2 days ago, and promptly found myself aground trying to turn around in a seeming dead end of a proclaimed “safe anchorage for one or two boats in an East wind.

Apart from being stuck for twenty minutes or so, I discovered later that evening that I had water under the aft bunk and pulled roughly a gallon out of the low space under the quadrant. This evening, after crossing Bimini to Ft Lauderdale, I pulled about the same out, to make it twice in the last two days.

I have never noticed water there before, though as I look now, I see a staining that has been there for quite some time, likely longer than the 18 months I’ve owned the boat, and so perhaps others have had issues with water getting through the packing and coming out the top of the fiberglass rudder sleeve.

With my phone I see what looks like a packing but below the quadrant. Have any of you dealt with an issue such as this?

All the best,
Steve Morrison
Sm 380, TouRai
Ft Lauderdale


Re: Jib Halyard Sheave

Duane Siegfri
 

Thanks Bill.

Duane


Re: Jib Halyard Sheave

Duane Siegfri
 

Mark,

No worries, thanks for looking, it's much appreciated.

Duane


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

greatketch@...
 

Everything Bill R said, and then some...

If I was in the market for a new genoa, I would immediately be concerned if I was asked what size genoa I wanted (130, 140, 150, etc).  If the sailmaker did not know what the size of the original sail was for this boat, I would find someone who did.  

At some point I would be sure to ask how the sail they intended to build would work with the Amel downwind poles. If they did not understand how those poles work, and did not know the sizes of the poles, I would go somewhere else. There is more to an Amel genoa than just size.  For example, the clew has to be at the right height for the downwind rig to work as it was designed.  I know this thread started with questions about upwind work, but we do a LOT more miles downwind than we do close hauled so downwind performance is important to me. 

It is likely a tall order to expect a random sailmaker to have a detailed understanding of how a Super Maramu is different from other boats they make sails for, and why just running off the dimensions in their rig database is NOT the right answer.  It is a tall order, but it is one I'll insist on.  

When I needed a new ballooner, I talked to several lofts, and got a LOT of responses that were some version of, "You need a WHAT?"  That would pretty much be the end of our discussion.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas