Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator pump not working

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Mark
 
On our high pressure pump there are two capacitors.
 
  • One is black 180 microfarad -0-20%, 220VAC, 40-60HZ FACON 70906.1412
  • One is white 70 microfarad +/-5% AC400V B, AC 450V C, 40/085/21 50-60 Hz ICAR Ecofill R-06-49A.
 
Let me  know if I can be of any other help.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad and Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54 #099
 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 31, 2018 7:54 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator pump not working

 

Did you come up with the correct size capacitor for your watermaker?  I have a 160 liter per hour version and the capicator is painted obstructing the name plate.  Any information would be appreciated.  Thanks.

Mark Mueller
A54 - 68 
Brass Ring
Ft. Lauderdale


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hurricane season SET UP

eric freedman
 

Hi Alessandro,

I attach about 100 feet of line to the swivel at the top of the foil.

I then rotate the foil until it is covered in line from top to bottom..

The end of the line I attach tightly to the end of the boom.

No noise and no banging.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 31, 2018 7:55 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hurricane season SET UP

 

 

Hi All,

I'm setting up my GRAND CRU for the Hurricane Season and , of course, I wish to remove all the sails: I'm looking around a SMART IDEA to avoid the furling bumping inside the masts (main and mizzen) when they are without the sails. 

I'd appreciate the all folks  ideas  smarter than me.

Fair winds

Alessandro

GRAND CRU SM #443 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator pump not working

Mark & Debbie Mueller
 

Did you come up with the correct size capacitor for your watermaker?  I have a 160 liter per hour version and the capicator is painted obstructing the name plate.  Any information would be appreciated.  Thanks.

Mark Mueller
A54 - 68 
Brass Ring
Ft. Lauderdale


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Installation second autopilot

eric freedman
 

Niklas,

The chain and sprockets are stock. They are available from many parts supply houses worldwide.

You just might have to have the mounting hole and keyway  machined to fit.

This is a company I use in the USA.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

https://www.mcmaster.com/#roller-chain-sprockets/=1c7k75i

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, March 30, 2018 1:10 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Installation second autopilot

 

 

Hello Steve

 

Thank you, i already have the rotary drive so i try to find a company that sell the chain and sprocket. I think i already have the keyway on the steering shaft. i am going to se if amel have any sprocket left maybe i am lucky.

 

Regards

Niklas SY Nipe sm2k#333

 

2018-03-29 19:39 GMT+02:00 Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hello Niklas,

 

I’m a little surprised you do not have a rotary drive, as I’ve seen many SMs, and they all had one. I’d be curious to know how many of you out there do not have a rotary drive. I own hull #72 (1992), and at that time the boats only came with a rotary drive, and at a later hull number Amel re-designed the rudder quadrant to accept a linear drive. 

 

If you decide to add a Rotary drive, you need to find a Raymarine type II 24 volt drive. The 12 volt drives are usually in stock here in the USA, but a 24 volt version is hard to find. I purchased a new 24v drive from Raymarine USA about a year and a half ago, and it was the last on they had to sell at that time. I suspect if you talk to the right person at Raymarine they can find you one, but you may have to wait a bit. 

 

With regards to the sprockets, on my boat the drive sprocket on the rotary drive is 19 teeth, and on the steering shaft it is 38 teeth. No guarantees the newer boats are the same, but I suspect they are. I just purchased a new steering shaft and sprocket for the shaft from Maude, and she was surprised to find they still had the shaft 38 tooth sprocket on the shelf. It sounded like I got the last sprocket, but you would have to ask Maude to be sure. Amel does not have the rotary drive sprocket or the chain. Raymarine actually has a part number for the drive sprocket, but when I spoke to them, they said they no longer sell them. I’m sure the drive sprocket could be found from some industrial supply place, but so far, all the ones I’ve found have a keyway slightly to wide for the shaft. I’m also looking for a new chain as a spare, but have not found one yet. If anyone has a source or the exact specs on the chain, please let me know. 

 

I’m assuming since your boat did not come with a rotary drive, your steering shaft does not have a keyway machined in it to hold the sprocket. If that is the case, you will have to completely disassemble the steering system, take the steering shaft to a machine shop, and have a keyway machined into it. You can’t do this until you have the new drive mounted, and can check the exact alignment of the the sprocket on the drive to the shaft. I just purchased a new steering shaft and steering racks from Amel, and was surprised the new shaft did not come with the keyway machined into it, and I had to have a machine shop do it for me.

 

As you can see, to add a rotary drive now will require some effort and expense. If it were me, I’d probably purchase a spare Linear drive which you should be able to change out in a half hour. 

 

Best of luck with your project. 

 

Regards,

 

Steve Davis

Aloha SM 72

KoOlina, Hawaii

 

Steve Davis

S/V Aloha


On Mar 28, 2018, at 10:12 PM, gloggler@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello

 

Im going to install Raymarine rotary drive type 2 24v as a second autopilot and wonder if anybody knows the size on steering sprocket, drive sprocket and chain and were i can it? Have been in contact with Amel but they did not know.

 

Regards Niklas Glöggler SY Nipe SM2K #333



 

--

Niklas Glöggler


Re: Hurricane season SET UP

Craig Briggs
 

Why remove the main and mizzen? Remove their outhaul lines and completely furl the sails into the masts so nothing is sticking out to be blown by the wind (nor damaged by UV).
Cheers, Craig SN68 


---In amelyachtowners@..., <grandcru443@...> wrote :

Hi All,

I'm setting up my GRAND CRU for the Hurricane Season and , of course, I wish to remove all the sails: I'm looking around a SMART IDEA to avoid the furling bumping inside the masts (main and mizzen) when they are without the sails. 

I'd appreciate the all folks  ideas  smarter than me.

Fair winds

Alessandro

GRAND CRU SM #443 


Re: Hurricane season SET UP

Paul Osterberg
 

We attached a three strand rope to the top furler hoist it and then furl about 10 revs then the rope will act as a dampers no noice from the foil.
Paul on sykerpa SM 259


Re: Hurricane season SET UP

Ian Park
 

Attach a 12 or 14 mm rope to the halliard. Hoist it up the mast and furl while guiding the furled rope from top to bottom. When two thirds down the mast pull the remainder to the end of the boom and tighten off on the cleat. This pulls the wrapped foil against the slot and stops the banging.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN96. Antigua


Hurricane season SET UP

alessandro gennai
 

Hi All,

I'm setting up my GRAND CRU for the Hurricane Season and , of course, I wish to remove all the sails: I'm looking around a SMART IDEA to avoid the furling bumping inside the masts (main and mizzen) when they are without the sails. 

I'd appreciate the all folks  ideas  smarter than me.

Fair winds

Alessandro

GRAND CRU SM #443 


Amel 50 review

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi All,


 There is a great review of the Amel 50 in April's Yachting World--she's on the front cover as well.


The reviewer is Pip Hare. We first met Pip in Piriapolis , Uruguay, where she had sailed two handed in The Shed,  an Oyster 37 which had seen better days. She decided to do the OSTAR, the single-handed transatlantic race, so she sailed back singlehanded from Uruguay to UK and set off on the race. Somewhere to the west of Ireland a lower shroud parted. Mast swaying,  she nursed the boat back to a bay on the south cost of Ireland where her father rowed out to her with a new stay. She wasn't allowed shore assistance beyond that ,so she had to rerig the boat herself . She set off in pursuit of her class who by now had 2-3 days lead on her. She overhauled most of them.

 Pip went on to compete  successfully in those crazy 30 footers which the French love, on races like the Route du Rhum and is probably at her happiest single handed in mid-Atlantic up to her waist in cold sea water, in the dark,  in the cockpit having just broached while trying to maintain 17 knots when her competitors have eased back to 10.


 So, you might wonder what on earth she would make of the Amel 50.  It was December,  dark, wet and windy off La Rochelle. She confesses that did feel overdressed sitting in the cockpit in her salopettes and seaboots ( remember them ?) with warmth rising from the saloon together with the aroma of bread and fresh coffee...


 Her conclusion:  " I can't sit on the fence about the Amel 50; it's a brilliant boat.........I arrived with some heavy preconceptions, perhaps about as much as the kind of sailor I am as the kind of boat I would be sailing. I was treated to the full Amel experience.... but if you take away the fine food, endless expressos and crisp white bed linen, the Amel still shines. It sails well, it is beautifully built and it made me smile. I left surprised and ever so slightly in love "


 Praise indeed ! I think the La Rochelle yard is going to be very busy.


 Ian and Judy,

 Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rescueing method of casualty (Person Over Board)

 

Phillip,

I believe that the way the Super Maramu was designed, rigged, and equipped, it may be superior to any other sailboat regarding your rescue questions.

The mizzen mast was rigged with 2 each 10mm halyards (1 port and 1 stbd) each capable of lifting at least 1000 pounds. Each can be hauled using the electric main sheet winch. More importantly, there is a block for each at the end of the mizzen boom which will aid in holding the retrieved person off the boat. With the mizzen sheet loose, the end of the  mizzen boom will elevate when the halyard shackle meets the boom block, allowing you to swing the boom and person up and over the rail.

However, all above is based on how the Super Maramu was designed and built and may not be true with a particular Super Maramu owned by a non-caring owner, or a smarter person than Henri Amel.I hope this helps you. If you need more information, please contact me. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Sat, Mar 31, 2018, 05:43 philipp.sollberger@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Dear experienced AMEL Yacht Owners,


Does anybody has experience in rescueing a casualty on Super Maramus? I'm instructor for ISAF courses and I'm thinking about the method for taking back on board a person who was fallen over board.

We have several possibilities to board somebody. 

Halyard of the balooner is for sure strong enough.

Halyard from the top from the spinnaker halyard. Is the fixation on mast with the shakle on the block strong enough to lift up a person in full wet suit with wet boots etc with a weight of about 150 kg?

What about the main mast with the boom? Is the steel wire which holds the boom, strong enough to lift up 150 kg or more?

Last but not least on the mizzen we can use the halyard for the mizzen staysail. Same question: Is the mizzen mast fixation on the top with shakle and block strong enough for lifting up 150 kg or more?

The last possibility is the halyard for the outboard or passerelle with the boom of the mizzen. Is this fixation strong enough to lift up 150 kg or more.


All your answer will be appreciated strongly and I thank you all very much for your ideas and thoughts about the subject which each us hopes it will never happen.

By the way: the AMEL 55 and later have a vang on the boom, which is the method for lifting up a person from the water.


From the RYA there is the recommendation, that casualty should lift up horizontally and for this you need a second halyard or the same one halyard but you need the strength of the double weight.


Many thanks an fair winds,


Philipp 

#124 SM Félicie




Rescueing method of casualty (Person Over Board)

philipp.sollberger@...
 

Dear experienced AMEL Yacht Owners,


Does anybody has experience in rescueing a casualty on Super Maramus? I'm instructor for ISAF courses and I'm thinking about the method for taking back on board a person who was fallen over board.

We have several possibilities to board somebody. 

Halyard of the balooner is for sure strong enough.

Halyard from the top from the spinnaker halyard. Is the fixation on mast with the shakle on the block strong enough to lift up a person in full wet suit with wet boots etc with a weight of about 150 kg?

What about the main mast with the boom? Is the steel wire which holds the boom, strong enough to lift up 150 kg or more?

Last but not least on the mizzen we can use the halyard for the mizzen staysail. Same question: Is the mizzen mast fixation on the top with shakle and block strong enough for lifting up 150 kg or more?

The last possibility is the halyard for the outboard or passerelle with the boom of the mizzen. Is this fixation strong enough to lift up 150 kg or more.


All your answer will be appreciated strongly and I thank you all very much for your ideas and thoughts about the subject which each us hopes it will never happen.

By the way: the AMEL 55 and later have a vang on the boom, which is the method for lifting up a person from the water.


From the RYA there is the recommendation, that casualty should lift up horizontally and for this you need a second halyard or the same one halyard but you need the strength of the double weight.


Many thanks an fair winds,


Philipp 

#124 SM Félicie




Re: Rats!

Duane Siegfri
 

Whoa!!!!  Guinea Pigs are related to rats and mice, and they're part of the food chain in Ecuador?   I'm not that hungry!

Duane


Re: Rats!

galacsea2000 <no_reply@...>
 

RATS CANNOT STAND THE ODOR/TASTE OF MINT.
Buy a bottle of VICKS (the stuff we humans/children put on your chest in mild cases of lung congestion) at your local pharmacy together with a bag of cotton balls. Deep cotton balls in vicks and place them in every holes, cabinets,.... and the rat will leave by itself, even if it must swim away.


Re: HULL GELCOAT REFURBISHING PROJECT - OLDER MARAMU

Alejandro Paquin
 

Hello Duane,
Yes I spend a lot of time in Venezuela, "Simpatico"´s is home based in Naiguatá, at a private marina Cub Puerto Azul. Our navigations take us mainly to the Venezuelan islands of La Blanquilla, La Tortuga, Los Roques, Aves de Barlovento and Sotavento. These islands are substantially offshore (70 NM or more) and are rather safe. Unfortunately some islands and parts of the mainland are not. The attached map shows in violet circles the unsafe areas.Generally speaking, anyone should avoid the island of Los Testigos, the northern coast of the Paria and Araya Peninsulas, Margarita and Puerto La Cruz. It is dangerous there.
Cumaná in on the mainland. There have also been reports of incidents in the Mochima area, which is between Puerto La Cruz and Cumaná. We are currently on the hard in a facility that seems to be rather safe. 
Venezuela in general has become (unfortunately)a very unsafe country. Crime is rampant and there is a lot of political and economical unrest. So if you are a foreign flag vessel and do not know your way around, don´t risk coming. 
Even locals are at a constant risk. So we sailed straight into Cumaná from the north. Sailboats are not very common these days. The Navimca yard claims we are the first sailing vessel to arrive there in over two years. Mostly there are fishing and working vessels (oil service boats, Coast Guard, and other small service boats, etc.)
When we depart in about 60 days, we intend to sail into the Gulf of Cariaco, about 26 NM east of Cumaná, then sail back though Mochima (daysail), eventually Margarita, La Blanquilla and then either Los Roques or back to the Club. 
Hope this answers some of your questions. 
More information in English: http://www.noonsite.com/Countries/Venezuela

Alex Paquin
s/v SIMPATICO
 


Re: Best Way to Ship Parts to The Bahamas

Mark Isaac
 

Thanks Bill. You're right, the local folks have been exceptionally helpful. 

Mark


Re: Best Way to Ship Parts to The Bahamas

Mark Isaac
 

Thanks Mark, you are spot on.  I have since discovered Watermakers Air has freight and package service on their passenger flights and they fly to Staniel Cay several times a day.

Mark


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Best Way to Ship Parts to The Bahamas

John Clark
 

Hi Mark,  here is the nearest I have for a cube relay.  It has eight pins not four.....


On Mar 29, 2018 10:02 AM, "isaac_02906@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello All,


Can anyone tell me the best (most reliable and fastest) way to get parts in The Bahamas?  I need a relay for my Onan generator and have found a supplier in Orlando willing to ship to me.  They suggest FedEx.  Online and cruising book research indicates this may or may not be the best way based on where you are receiving the part.


Mark Isaac

SM #391

Staniel Cay, Bahamas


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Galapagos and Marquesas out of season. Pluses and minuses.

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Porter,

I have made two Pacific Ocean voyages, one in 1991; Panama, Marquesas, Tuamotus, Society islands Tonga, NZ, Fiji, Vanuatu, Solomons, Papua New Guinea, Philippines  and on...and another 2002-3.

So a while ago. I will not comment on Ecuador or the Galapagos as it is all rule based and my experience is historical. However I can comment on French Polynesia as we spent a cyclone season in the Society islands in 2002. 

I love the Marquesas islands but there are no really good anchorages at all. One tends to roll everywhere. So hanging out for months on end in the Marquesas would not be much fun. Not to mention very limited hardware supplies. I also love the Tuamotus but they are very exposed, so although the anchorages are flat the lagoons are huge and a big chop can develop when the wind shifts.

However I feel that with modern weather forecasting one could safely cruise Tahiti, Morea, Huahini, Raiatea even Bora Bora and Maupiti. You would have to be ready to sail to avoid any storms. Tahiti does not get many. I would say that hanging out in Tahiti/Morea area for a cyclone season is a bit like staying in Grenada for the hurricane season. You should keep a good watch on the weather, be ready to sail towards the equator if required. There are also some excellent hurricane holes, as with Grenada. The main difference is that while Trinidad is a mere 85 miles to the south it is a long way to anywhere north from Tahiti.

Many French boats stay year round in French Polynesia. 

Having said that it is pretty wet! We also had two tropical storms packing about 65kn. The first  in Bora Bora and in the safe season July 1991. In our anchorage three yachts  (out of about a dozen)were washed ashore! In those days we did not have grib files! We had sailed in that afternoon and there was a bloody great swell outside the reef and a dark dirty looking sky. The barometer was steady until dusk when it started to plummet. I felt that something was going to happen so set two anchors por su caso. The wind came and  veered from the SE to S and finally SW. Our anchorage was only protected by the fringing reef. It was a long night.

The other was in Rabaul in PNG. It was Christmas time and we were close tot the equator in a safe area. However she blew. We had taken a mooring off the YC that dragged (not doing that again). There was a massive cat 5  cyclone to the south of us  by several hundred miles so we got off lightly. It still blew storm force and rained stair rods. Solid columns of water!

The one caveat to the above opinion is that during el nino years Tahiti is more likely to be hit by a cyclone than other years. The other point about an extended Pacific cruise is that you need to be well prepared for weather to change whatever the season, as I guess anywhere. 

Nick

Amelia (Amel 54 #019)

On 30 Mar 2018, at 16:16, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Porter,

I wish I had good answers, but instead have some questions. 

Are you fairly certain a 1 year visa is possible? Rene is Dutch, and his wife is Canadian. I wonder if he was able to get his wife a 1 yr visa due to the fact that he is an EU citizen. I had always heard the long stay visa for Americans was only 6 months instead of the standard 3 we normally get. I’ve also read that after the 2 visits required to the French embassy for the long stay Visa, it is not always granted on the spot, and you may not know if you actually have one until arriving in French Polynesia.  

I’d be a bit hesitant to rely on historic cyclone patterns when on the edge of the cyclone belt, as the weather patterns seem to be changing a bit as the ocean temps are rising. It also seems like a very long time to spend in the Marquesas, and would expect the off season part is going to be seriously hot, humid, and squally. 

We just sailed from Panama to Hawaii instead of our previously planned trip to FP this year to help out with my ill 94 year old father, and hope to Be headed that way via the Line islands in the 2019 season. Good luck with getting it all figured out, and let us all know what you discover. 

Regards,

Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
KoOlina, Hawaii

On Mar 30, 2018, at 04:30, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I very much appreciate all the thoughtful insights in every regard, and so I propose these technical questions.

We are heavily considering a transit of the Canal in June.
We've had extensive discussions with Rene of Island Water World in St. Martin (who some may know) and others who argue for the Pacific approach outlined below.

It is based on 3 assumptions:

1. A US citizen can get a 1 year visa for French Polynesia in Panama at the French consulate there.
2. Entering Equador on the mainland, one can get an extended cruising permit with exit through the Galapagos with minimal fees over an extended time-period.
 and the third:

3. The Marquesas are outside the cyclone zone and should be considered a reasonable all weather destination.

Based on the above, and a fair amount of research on the web etc.  We are considering a transit in June, July.
Heading south along the west coast of S America, leaving the boat in Ecuador for an inland experience, then Galapagos and Marquesas late part of this year.  Early start on the westward cruising of the pacific in march/April 2019 toward New Zealand or Torres Straits.

Noting, while the Marquesas are on the cusp of cyclone territory, their location does not completely exclude them from circular storms, what storm options would we have with good intel.  We have and use iridium and predict wind a-lot with excellent outcomes for the past year. 

What thoughts, considerations, concerns and or advice might you have for this concept?

Very much appreciated!


Porter McRoberts
S/V Ibis: Amel 54-#152
Martinique











Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Galapagos and Marquesas out of season. Pluses and minuses.

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Porter,

I wish I had good answers, but instead have some questions. 

Are you fairly certain a 1 year visa is possible? Rene is Dutch, and his wife is Canadian. I wonder if he was able to get his wife a 1 yr visa due to the fact that he is an EU citizen. I had always heard the long stay visa for Americans was only 6 months instead of the standard 3 we normally get. I’ve also read that after the 2 visits required to the French embassy for the long stay Visa, it is not always granted on the spot, and you may not know if you actually have one until arriving in French Polynesia.  

I’d be a bit hesitant to rely on historic cyclone patterns when on the edge of the cyclone belt, as the weather patterns seem to be changing a bit as the ocean temps are rising. It also seems like a very long time to spend in the Marquesas, and would expect the off season part is going to be seriously hot, humid, and squally. 

We just sailed from Panama to Hawaii instead of our previously planned trip to FP this year to help out with my ill 94 year old father, and hope to Be headed that way via the Line islands in the 2019 season. Good luck with getting it all figured out, and let us all know what you discover. 

Regards,

Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
KoOlina, Hawaii

On Mar 30, 2018, at 04:30, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I very much appreciate all the thoughtful insights in every regard, and so I propose these technical questions.

We are heavily considering a transit of the Canal in June.
We've had extensive discussions with Rene of Island Water World in St. Martin (who some may know) and others who argue for the Pacific approach outlined below.

It is based on 3 assumptions:

1. A US citizen can get a 1 year visa for French Polynesia in Panama at the French consulate there.
2. Entering Equador on the mainland, one can get an extended cruising permit with exit through the Galapagos with minimal fees over an extended time-period.
 and the third:

3. The Marquesas are outside the cyclone zone and should be considered a reasonable all weather destination.

Based on the above, and a fair amount of research on the web etc.  We are considering a transit in June, July.
Heading south along the west coast of S America, leaving the boat in Ecuador for an inland experience, then Galapagos and Marquesas late part of this year.  Early start on the westward cruising of the pacific in march/April 2019 toward New Zealand or Torres Straits.

Noting, while the Marquesas are on the cusp of cyclone territory, their location does not completely exclude them from circular storms, what storm options would we have with good intel.  We have and use iridium and predict wind a-lot with excellent outcomes for the past year. 

What thoughts, considerations, concerns and or advice might you have for this concept?

Very much appreciated!


Porter McRoberts
S/V Ibis: Amel 54-#152
Martinique









Re: In Mast Electric Furler question

Arlo
 

Thanks Craig,I will disassemble this weekend and see what is going on there. Definitely appreciate the information. Because I can still hear the motor spinning when it stops furling I was also thinking that it was a worn gear not engaging fully as well.....

Will post pictures and update once apart....