Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, Never having the elbow off , I never knew the interior design and the potential choke point for water flow . It had not been included in my thought process as a possible cause for elevated temps, as I scratched my head pondering yet once again, about a problem without a obvious solution . Now I can put the"petal to the metal", cool !
Thanks, 
Pat SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Fri, May 4, 2018 9:02 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling

 
Pat,

The simple answer is that all the water that flows through the raw water system does go out the exhaust elbow.  But like so many things "boatish" the simple answer might not always be 100% correct...

On our Amel there is one other route for a small percentage of the water to take, and that is out the syphon break.  According to people who should know, the syphon break was a modification that Amel introduced into the production run close to the time ours was built.  So in your case, maybe, maybe not...

In any event... a significant restriction of water flow at the exhaust elbow would reduce total water flow through the system.  The additional back pressure would also probably reduce the lifespan of your impeller.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Royal Island Harbor, Bahamas.


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Mark, I have always insured that my impeller was in good shape and keep my heat exchanger clean. Excuse my ignorance , but does all the raw water pass through that channel ,I suppose it does . This was the first time I ever had the elbow off. It appears that I have stumbled onto the cause of a puzzling problem I have had for some time. When my rpms went up so did my temperature . Maybe having to take off and rebuild my turbo was a good thing. Cautionary note, I sucked up a paper towel left in the engine room into the air intake for the turbo. I am now putting a screen across the inlet to prevent anything from being suck in.
Thanks,
Pat SM#123



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling

greatketch@...
 

Pat,

The simple answer is that all the water that flows through the raw water system does go out the exhaust elbow.  But like so many things "boatish" the simple answer might not always be 100% correct...

On our Amel there is one other route for a small percentage of the water to take, and that is out the syphon break.  According to people who should know, the syphon break was a modification that Amel introduced into the production run close to the time ours was built.  So in your case, maybe, maybe not...

In any event... a significant restriction of water flow at the exhaust elbow would reduce total water flow through the system.  The additional back pressure would also probably reduce the lifespan of your impeller.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Royal Island Harbor, Bahamas.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailw32@...> wrote :

Mark, I have always insured that my impeller was in good shape and keep my heat exchanger clean. Excuse my ignorance , but does all the raw water pass through that channel ,I suppose it does . This was the first time I ever had the elbow off. It appears that I have stumbled onto the cause of a puzzling problem I have had for some time. When my rpms went up so did my temperature . Maybe having to take off and rebuild my turbo was a good thing. Cautionary note, I sucked up a paper towel left in the engine room into the air intake for the turbo. I am now putting a screen across the inlet to prevent anything from being suck in.
Thanks,
Pat SM#123



Gooseneck failure

James Cromie
 

I would like to find out from more experienced Amel owners if anyone has experienced a failure of the gooseneck, and if so, how did you jury rig a repair?

Thank you to everyone.  

James
Soteria
SM2000 347


Re: Exhaust elbow and cooling

greatketch@...
 

The short answer is... yes it can...

When I worked as service manager for a charter company, we had a half dozen J-105s with cute little 2 cylinder Yanmars. They were all set up with the "class legal" folding prop.  This prop was much too steeply pitched for the engine, and resulted in the engine running way below its rated rpm at full throttle.  And being J-105 sailors, they never did nothing at less than full throttle!

The result was the exhaust elbows were hopelessly clogged with soot and coke in 18 to 24 months of operation. We kept these elbows as stocked spare parts! 

One of the first symptoms, (if you missed the black smoke) was over heating as the water passages were restricted.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Royal Island Harbor, Bahamas

---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailw32@...> wrote :

I think my boat has been running hot for for a couple of years . I just ran it for about 45 minutes after launching and it ran much cooler than previously. The only thing I have done , is that I cleaned the exhaust elbow, it was not that bad. However I also reamed out the channel that I believe water passes through. My question... If that channel is partially blocked would that result in the engine runner hotter.
Thanks,
Pat SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling

Patrick McAneny
 

Mark, I have always insured that my impeller was in good shape and keep my heat exchanger clean. Excuse my ignorance , but does all the raw water pass through that channel ,I suppose it does . This was the first time I ever had the elbow off. It appears that I have stumbled onto the cause of a puzzling problem I have had for some time. When my rpms went up so did my temperature . Maybe having to take off and rebuild my turbo was a good thing. Cautionary note, I sucked up a paper towel left in the engine room into the air intake for the turbo. I am now putting a screen across the inlet to prevent anything from being suck in.
Thanks,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Fri, May 4, 2018 3:38 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling

 
Pat,
 
Any obstruction on the salt-water cooling side before or after raw water pump is going to impede flow and cause the engine to run hot. So the answer is, yes.
 
The most common causes for a boat engine to run hot (assuming adequate water flow is available) is a damaged impeller or blocked heat exchanger/after cooler.
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Bonaire
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, May 4, 2018 3:18 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling
 
 
I think my boat has been running hot for for a couple of years . I just ran it for about 45 minutes after launching and it ran much cooler than previously. The only thing I have done , is that I cleaned the exhaust elbow, it was not that bad. However I also reamed out the channel that I believe water passes through. My question... If that channel is partially blocked would that result in the engine runner hotter.
Thanks,
Pat SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling

Mark Erdos
 

Pat,

 

Any obstruction on the salt-water cooling side before or after raw water pump is going to impede flow and cause the engine to run hot. So the answer is, yes.

 

The most common causes for a boat engine to run hot (assuming adequate water flow is available) is a damaged impeller or blocked heat exchanger/after cooler.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, May 4, 2018 3:18 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling

 

 

I think my boat has been running hot for for a couple of years . I just ran it for about 45 minutes after launching and it ran much cooler than previously. The only thing I have done , is that I cleaned the exhaust elbow, it was not that bad. However I also reamed out the channel that I believe water passes through. My question... If that channel is partially blocked would that result in the engine runner hotter.

Thanks,

Pat SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust elbow and cooling

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi pat. If it was blocked enough to significantly slow the salt water flow I guess it could. The fact that now the motor runs cooler seems to suggest that to be the case 

Regards

Danny

SM  299

Ocean Pearl


On 05 May 2018 at 07:18 "sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I think my boat has been running hot for for a couple of years . I just ran it for about 45 minutes after launching and it ran much cooler than previously. The only thing I have done , is that I cleaned the exhaust elbow, it was not that bad. However I also reamed out the channel that I believe water passes through. My question... If that channel is partially blocked would that result in the engine runner hotter.

Thanks,
Pat SM#123

 


 

 


Exhaust elbow and cooling

Patrick McAneny
 

I think my boat has been running hot for for a couple of years . I just ran it for about 45 minutes after launching and it ran much cooler than previously. The only thing I have done , is that I cleaned the exhaust elbow, it was not that bad. However I also reamed out the channel that I believe water passes through. My question... If that channel is partially blocked would that result in the engine runner hotter.
Thanks,
Pat SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

karkauai
 

Thank you, Bill. Needing an anchor ready to deploy sounds more likely than loss of a well-secured anchor. When I figure out my cable method, I'll post a pic or two.

Kent
SM243
KRISTY

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
karkauai@...
Panama cell: +507-61171896
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On May 3, 2018, at 4:28 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

clutch


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

karkauai
 

That must have been quite a shock, literally and emotionally!

It was "boisterous" to say the least.  Short steep 6-8 ft waves with a period of about 25 ft.  As we'd come down off one, the nextkn face was already under us.  Even at an AWA of 75d we were still banging some on the port tack.  By far the worst conditions I've experienced.

I'm surprised and lucky that my anchor didn't set like yours did.  We were in 75' of water with 300' of chain out.  I have no idea how long it dragged before breaking free.  In 25-35 kt winds I only had a little main and genoa out, and with the banging slowing the boat down too, I wasn't surprised at our 2-3kt boat speed.

A friend (Maramu owner) here is letting me use his mooring ball until my new chain arrives, so I didn't have to deploy my Fortress on nylon rode +/- chain. Thanks  again David!

I still don't have a good feel for deploying an anchor on nylon rode off of the port bow roller.  I love the ROCNA, but it's something I'll undoubtedly have to do some day as a second anchor, so I guess I need to experiment until I find a satisfactory way to get it back aboard without scratching the boat up with the chain.  I'm still thinking that with another crew aboard, hooking the snubber to the middle of the chain and raising it with a spare halyard would work if it wasn't too rough to hold it away from the boat as it comes up.  Single-handed, I haven't a clue.

Still hoping someone will have a great tip on this maneuver.

I'm going to do a quick haul out in a week or two to check the bottom and keel for damage and/or loss of bottom paint.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243

On May 3, 2018, at 1:31 PM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Wow, Kent - must have been a boisterous sail, to say the least!  


We had a laughable time when our anchor went over off Sardinia a few years back. I had lifted the chain off the windlass and layed it on deck the day before so I could use the rope gypsy to snug up a dock line at a marina. In the morning I just cast off the line and forgot to put the chain back in its gypsy. So, we took off across a shallow bay - about 15 feet deep - in a beautiful power reach, doing like 8 knots. 

After only a few minutes a little chop bounced the unrestrained anchor over the bow, all 300 feet of chain spewed and screamed out the hawse pipe and then came up rock hard on the rope dead ended in the chain locker.  Talk about having a good set the first time!  We spun around in about one second flat to face the anchor and that sucker was buried to China. After we got over the shock and surprise and realized that nothing was damaged we had a good laugh at ourselves. Thank heavens we were far enough away from the marina so no one saw our antics! Took forever to get the damn thing out of the muck.

I've actually adopted a version of that (much calmer and controlled) occasionally and lower the anchor while driving forward and downwind over the spot where I want the anchor to end up. I then start a slow turn so the chain won't come up on the hull and continue slowly as the moving boat sets the anchor and swings around into the wind. Usually works great.

Cheers, Craig SN68 Sangaris


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Hi Mark,
The bitter end was tied off in the chain locker with 3 ft of 3/4inch 3-strand nylon.  It was shredded. The u-bolt it was attached to feels intact, but I can't see it.  Will get a mirror and report what I find.

Kent
KRISTY
SM243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering cable part number

Craig Briggs
 


Hi Miles,
I took a look at my Santorin and see no markings on the steering cable, either, nor on the racks, but do have that drawing showing Morse Command 401. 

On-line I came across a "Mechanical Steering Identification Guide" from the "Seastar Solutions Catalog" that shows the Morse Command 401 to be obsolete and with no replacement cable available. It shows the replacement to be the Seastar Teleflex NFB (no feed back) unit. I chatted with a dealer and he said probably the NFB Pro Dual cable system would be the best replacement and that would require replacing the steering wheel mechanism too. Yikes! He also said lubricating an old cable is not effective as there's no tool to get the lubricant inside the cable.

Sounds like if you can get the old cable replicated it would be the best bet.

Good luck with it and keep us posted.

Cheers, Craig Briggs SN68 Sangaris

---In amelyachtowners@..., <smilesbernard@...> wrote :

Hello Dave

Many thanks for looking - very much appreciated and sorry if it was a wild goose chase
Ive done some trawling and found some details in the attached diagrams
My french is < schoolboy but i think that one says that the steering cable for is a MORSE Command 401
The other that the steering cables on the Santorin is the same as the SM

Looking at the pictures it seems identical to the steering system on SeaLove - an older Maramu

I don't have an actual part number but i'll make some enquiries today about replacements for the 401 

Hopefully the info might be  help to other folk too at some point so i'll let this group know what i discover

All the best and thanks again for you help

Miles

Maramu 162
On Friday, May 4, 2018, 4:14:18 AM GMT+1, David Wallace svairops@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 

Hi Miles,

We're aboard Air Ops now so I took a look at the steering cables and could find no markings at all. At the quadrant, most of the cable is not visible, only the end fittings. Over the galley, there were also no visible markings. If someone else can give a precise location to look l'll try again. Wish I had an answer for you.

Best regards, 
Dave and Merry
s/v Air Ops
Sea of Cortez, BCS, MX


On May 3, 2018, at 1:35 PM, smiles bernard smilesbernard@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello there 


With help from James / Sueño and Graham /Zephyr of this parish I have pinpointed the source of stiffness in my older Maramu steering. 

It’s one of the push pull control cables. 

I am not near the boat currently (I’m in uk and she’s in the canaries) but am keen to see if I can source a replacement before our rapidly approaching family adventures begin.  

Unfortunately I do not have a part number for the troublesome cable.  

Maud at Amel has kindly looked to see if they have any information on the cable. 
She has had no luck but believes they were Morse made. Mine are red as can be just about seen in the photo. 

Apparently the morse cables are stamped with some form of part number near their end. Probably the end near the steering quadrant. 

If any fellow older Maramu owners would be kind enough to have a look and see if they can find a part number I’d be very grateful. 

I’m also going to try and drip a silicon based lubricant down the cable but if I can get a spare or a replica made up I would more comfortable. 

FYI apparently these guys will make up replicas of discontinued cables so worst case is I fly back from the boat with the cable in a suitcase!


Many thanks 

Miles
<image1.jpeg>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering cable part number

smiles bernard
 

Hello Dave

Many thanks for looking - very much appreciated and sorry if it was a wild goose chase
Ive done some trawling and found some details in the attached diagrams
My french is < schoolboy but i think that one says that the steering cable for is a MORSE Command 401
The other that the steering cables on the Santorin is the same as the SM

Looking at the pictures it seems identical to the steering system on SeaLove - an older Maramu

I don't have an actual part number but i'll make some enquiries today about replacements for the 401 

Hopefully the info might be  help to other folk too at some point so i'll let this group know what i discover

All the best and thanks again for you help

Miles

Maramu 162

On Friday, May 4, 2018, 4:14:18 AM GMT+1, David Wallace svairops@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Hi Miles,

We're aboard Air Ops now so I took a look at the steering cables and could find no markings at all. At the quadrant, most of the cable is not visible, only the end fittings. Over the galley, there were also no visible markings. If someone else can give a precise location to look l'll try again. Wish I had an answer for you.

Best regards, 
Dave and Merry
s/v Air Ops
Sea of Cortez, BCS, MX


On May 3, 2018, at 1:35 PM, smiles bernard smilesbernard@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello there 


With help from James / Sueño and Graham /Zephyr of this parish I have pinpointed the source of stiffness in my older Maramu steering. 

It’s one of the push pull control cables. 

I am not near the boat currently (I’m in uk and she’s in the canaries) but am keen to see if I can source a replacement before our rapidly approaching family adventures begin.  

Unfortunately I do not have a part number for the troublesome cable.  

Maud at Amel has kindly looked to see if they have any information on the cable. 
She has had no luck but believes they were Morse made. Mine are red as can be just about seen in the photo. 

Apparently the morse cables are stamped with some form of part number near their end. Probably the end near the steering quadrant. 

If any fellow older Maramu owners would be kind enough to have a look and see if they can find a part number I’d be very grateful. 

I’m also going to try and drip a silicon based lubricant down the cable but if I can get a spare or a replica made up I would more comfortable. 

FYI apparently these guys will make up replicas of discontinued cables so worst case is I fly back from the boat with the cable in a suitcase!


Many thanks 

Miles



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering cable part number [1 Attachment]

David Wallace
 

Hi Miles,
We're aboard Air Ops now so I took a look at the steering cables and could find no markings at all. At the quadrant, most of the cable is not visible, only the end fittings. Over the galley, there were also no visible markings. If someone else can give a precise location to look l'll try again. Wish I had an answer for you.

Best regards, 
Dave and Merry
s/v Air Ops
Sea of Cortez, BCS, MX


On May 3, 2018, at 1:35 PM, smiles bernard smilesbernard@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello there 


With help from James / Sueño and Graham /Zephyr of this parish I have pinpointed the source of stiffness in my older Maramu steering. 

It’s one of the push pull control cables. 

I am not near the boat currently (I’m in uk and she’s in the canaries) but am keen to see if I can source a replacement before our rapidly approaching family adventures begin.  

Unfortunately I do not have a part number for the troublesome cable.  

Maud at Amel has kindly looked to see if they have any information on the cable. 
She has had no luck but believes they were Morse made. Mine are red as can be just about seen in the photo. 

Apparently the morse cables are stamped with some form of part number near their end. Probably the end near the steering quadrant. 

If any fellow older Maramu owners would be kind enough to have a look and see if they can find a part number I’d be very grateful. 

I’m also going to try and drip a silicon based lubricant down the cable but if I can get a spare or a replica made up I would more comfortable. 

FYI apparently these guys will make up replicas of discontinued cables so worst case is I fly back from the boat with the cable in a suitcase!


Many thanks 

Miles
<image1.jpeg>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

greatketch@...
 

No, we do not stow the anchor when sailing.  Such a plan has good aspects, but I think, on balance, it is a bad idea. An anchor, ready to deploy, is an important part of a boat's safety systems.  Of course, in the middle of the ocean it is of no use, but on approaching your destination, what to do if the weather is not suited to a safe re-installation?  I might change my mind on a boat small enough that the anchor was easily managed by hand on a pitching deck, but that’s not true of an SM—at least not for me!

I think it’s important that what ever method secures the anchor, it is capable of pulling it tightly, and holding snuggly so the anchor does not bounce around on the roller, even in boisterous sailing conditions. We consider the chain and electrically disabled windlass as the primary holder of the anchor, and the lashing as the backup.  I am not sure what arrangement of cable could be made to snug the anchor tightly, but if a suitable arrangement can be made, nothing wrong with using cable.

On Harmonie we have a high amperage breaker that is dedicated to the windlass motor, so activation by error—or malfunction—can be avoided.

In general, if the anchor and securing line are routinely moving around enough that chafe is a serious issue, I would find that unacceptable. If I see the anchor moving on the roller while underway, I consider that a serious problem that needs fixing quickly. 

On my old boat I used a hook on a locking lever that did an excellent job.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Royal Island, Bahamas


---In amelyachtowners@..., <karkauai@...> wrote :

Thanks, Bill.  I'll definitely tighten the clutch from now on.  I take it that you do not stow your anchor while underway.  In reading about anchoring, that is recommended by some.
I'm thinking of securing it with a cable that won't stretch instead of line that's more prone to stretching and chafe.  A pelican clip might be useful to snug it up tight.  Any reason not to use cable?

Kent
KRISTY
SM243

On May 3, 2018, at 10:29 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Duane,


On Harmonie we do likewise, except the anchor safety line is permanently attached to the center cleat on one end, and the other end ties to the cleat on top of the windlass.  That way you can easily see—from the helm—that the anchor is secure.  Learned that one here from Bill Rouse...

The safety line also goes through the shank of the anchor, bypassing shackles, and any other bits that might fail.

Last thing on this, when underway, we turn power off to the windlass motor, and tighten the clutch.

I never saw anyone lose a boat from losing an anchor, but I saw someone lose his job after an anchor came undone and his response was...suboptimal.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Eleuthera, Bahamas


Steering cable part number

smiles bernard
 

Hello there 

With help from James / Sueño and Graham /Zephyr of this parish I have pinpointed the source of stiffness in my older Maramu steering. 

It’s one of the push pull control cables. 

I am not near the boat currently (I’m in uk and she’s in the canaries) but am keen to see if I can source a replacement before our rapidly approaching family adventures begin.  

Unfortunately I do not have a part number for the troublesome cable.  

Maud at Amel has kindly looked to see if they have any information on the cable. 
She has had no luck but believes they were Morse made. Mine are red as can be just about seen in the photo. 

Apparently the morse cables are stamped with some form of part number near their end. Probably the end near the steering quadrant. 

If any fellow older Maramu owners would be kind enough to have a look and see if they can find a part number I’d be very grateful. 

I’m also going to try and drip a silicon based lubricant down the cable but if I can get a spare or a replica made up I would more comfortable. 

FYI apparently these guys will make up replicas of discontinued cables so worst case is I fly back from the boat with the cable in a suitcase!


Many thanks 

Miles



Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

Craig Briggs
 

Wow, Kent - must have been a boisterous sail, to say the least!  

We had a laughable time when our anchor went over off Sardinia a few years back. I had lifted the chain off the windlass and layed it on deck the day before so I could use the rope gypsy to snug up a dock line at a marina. In the morning I just cast off the line and forgot to put the chain back in its gypsy. So, we took off across a shallow bay - about 15 feet deep - in a beautiful power reach, doing like 8 knots. 

After only a few minutes a little chop bounced the unrestrained anchor over the bow, all 300 feet of chain spewed and screamed out the hawse pipe and then came up rock hard on the rope dead ended in the chain locker.  Talk about having a good set the first time!  We spun around in about one second flat to face the anchor and that sucker was buried to China. After we got over the shock and surprise and realized that nothing was damaged we had a good laugh at ourselves. Thank heavens we were far enough away from the marina so no one saw our antics! Took forever to get the damn thing out of the muck.

I've actually adopted a version of that (much calmer and controlled) occasionally and lower the anchor while driving forward and downwind over the spot where I want the anchor to end up. I then start a slow turn so the chain won't come up on the hull and continue slowly as the moving boat sets the anchor and swings around into the wind. Usually works great.

Cheers, Craig SN68 Sangaris


---In amelyachtowners@..., <karkauai@...> wrote :

Hi Mark,
The bitter end was tied off in the chain locker with 3 ft of 3/4inch 3-strand nylon.  It was shredded. The u-bolt it was attached to feels intact, but I can't see it.  Will get a mirror and report what I find.

Kent
KRISTY
SM243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

karkauai
 

Hi Mark,
The bitter end was tied off in the chain locker with 3 ft of 3/4inch 3-strand nylon.  It was shredded. The u-bolt it was attached to feels intact, but I can't see it.  Will get a mirror and report what I find.

Kent
KRISTY
SM243

On May 3, 2018, at 11:29 AM, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

To all posting about an anchor losses,

 

I am wondering how it is possible to lose the anchor and chain since the bitter end of the chain is secured to the vessel with about 6 feet of rope in the chain locker? (rope should be used and not chain fastened to the boat in case of an instance where the anchor must be cut loose). Did the force of the anchor going down rip out the rope??? What happened?

 

We have always secured the anchor when underway with a rope to the towing cleat. I’m not sure I like Bill R’s idea of also tying to the windless since this would make it possible to trip over the line if on the foredeck.

 

We power off the windlass when underway and also while at anchor (once it is set with a snubber).

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2018 11:09 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

 

 

Bill and Bill,

 

  Thanks for the tip about tying the line securing the anchor to the top of the windlass so that it can be seen from the helm, that is a really great idea that I will adopt.  Did you use anything special for the line?  I am just wondering if there could be a chafe issue if this safety line somehow became the only thing holding the anchor?    Bill Rouse has a lot of great ideas like this to share, I miss his regular input on this forum.  So thanks to both of you for this one.

 

  One more anchor story.  I had designed and built a heavy duty anchor chute to fit my customers stainless plow.  The day before departure on the Millennium Odyssey, the crew arrived and one of the crew placed the anchor on the anchor chute without anything securing it.  Seeing this I strongly suggested that he tie the anchor off but the crew member  insisted that was fine and when he stepped off the boat the anchor self launched into the marina basin.  No problem, the crew member said, we know right where it is, we will just get a diver.  Well the marina basin was originally dredged to be 20+ feet deep and had silted in over the years..  2 divers and half of a day later, no anchor.  Worse, the lost anchor was not a CQR and we could not find an exact replacement in time so he left with an anchor that did not fit the anchor chute properly.  

 

James Alton

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

On May 3, 2018, at 10:29 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Duane,

 

On Harmonie we do likewise, except the anchor safety line is permanently attached to the center cleat on one end, and the other end ties to the cleat on top of the windlass.  That way you can easily see—from the helm—that the anchor is secure.  Learned that one here from Bill Rouse...

 

The safety line also goes through the shank of the anchor, bypassing shackles, and any other bits that might fail.

 

Last thing on this, when underway, we turn power off to the windlass motor, and tighten the clutch.

 

I never saw anyone lose a boat from losing an anchor, but I saw someone lose his job after an anchor came undone and his response was...suboptimal.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Eleuthera, Bahamas

---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Kent, 

 

Sorry to hear of your troubles.  In answer to your question of stowing the main anchor, I always tie a line from the anchor to the large center cleat to hold the anchor in place while underway in lieu of dismounting and stowing the anchor.  That way you have the security of knowing it is held fast, yet it is available if needed.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

karkauai
 

Thanks, Bill.  I'll definitely tighten the clutch from now on.  I take it that you do not stow your anchor while underway.  In reading about anchoring, that is recommended by some.
I'm thinking of securing it with a cable that won't stretch instead of line that's more prone to stretching and chafe.  A pelican clip might be useful to snug it up tight.  Any reason not to use cable?

Kent
KRISTY
SM243

On May 3, 2018, at 10:29 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Duane,


On Harmonie we do likewise, except the anchor safety line is permanently attached to the center cleat on one end, and the other end ties to the cleat on top of the windlass.  That way you can easily see—from the helm—that the anchor is secure.  Learned that one here from Bill Rouse...

The safety line also goes through the shank of the anchor, bypassing shackles, and any other bits that might fail.

Last thing on this, when underway, we turn power off to the windlass motor, and tighten the clutch.

I never saw anyone lose a boat from losing an anchor, but I saw someone lose his job after an anchor came undone and his response was...suboptimal.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Eleuthera, Bahamas

---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Kent, 

Sorry to hear of your troubles.  In answer to your question of stowing the main anchor, I always tie a line from the anchor to the large center cleat to hold the anchor in place while underway in lieu of dismounting and stowing the anchor.  That way you have the security of knowing it is held fast, yet it is available if needed.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

Mark Erdos
 

To all posting about an anchor losses,

 

I am wondering how it is possible to lose the anchor and chain since the bitter end of the chain is secured to the vessel with about 6 feet of rope in the chain locker? (rope should be used and not chain fastened to the boat in case of an instance where the anchor must be cut loose). Did the force of the anchor going down rip out the rope??? What happened?

 

We have always secured the anchor when underway with a rope to the towing cleat. I’m not sure I like Bill R’s idea of also tying to the windless since this would make it possible to trip over the line if on the foredeck.

 

We power off the windlass when underway and also while at anchor (once it is set with a snubber).

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2018 11:09 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

 

 

Bill and Bill,

 

  Thanks for the tip about tying the line securing the anchor to the top of the windlass so that it can be seen from the helm, that is a really great idea that I will adopt.  Did you use anything special for the line?  I am just wondering if there could be a chafe issue if this safety line somehow became the only thing holding the anchor?    Bill Rouse has a lot of great ideas like this to share, I miss his regular input on this forum.  So thanks to both of you for this one.

 

  One more anchor story.  I had designed and built a heavy duty anchor chute to fit my customers stainless plow.  The day before departure on the Millennium Odyssey, the crew arrived and one of the crew placed the anchor on the anchor chute without anything securing it.  Seeing this I strongly suggested that he tie the anchor off but the crew member  insisted that was fine and when he stepped off the boat the anchor self launched into the marina basin.  No problem, the crew member said, we know right where it is, we will just get a diver.  Well the marina basin was originally dredged to be 20+ feet deep and had silted in over the years.  2 divers and half of a day later, no anchor.  Worse, the lost anchor was not a CQR and we could not find an exact replacement in time so he left with an anchor that did not fit the anchor chute properly.  

 

James Alton

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

On May 3, 2018, at 10:29 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Duane,

 

On Harmonie we do likewise, except the anchor safety line is permanently attached to the center cleat on one end, and the other end ties to the cleat on top of the windlass.  That way you can easily see—from the helm—that the anchor is secure.  Learned that one here from Bill Rouse...

 

The safety line also goes through the shank of the anchor, bypassing shackles, and any other bits that might fail.

 

Last thing on this, when underway, we turn power off to the windlass motor, and tighten the clutch.

 

I never saw anyone lose a boat from losing an anchor, but I saw someone lose his job after an anchor came undone and his response was...suboptimal.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Eleuthera, Bahamas

---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Kent, 

 

Sorry to hear of your troubles.  In answer to your question of stowing the main anchor, I always tie a line from the anchor to the large center cleat to hold the anchor in place while underway in lieu of dismounting and stowing the anchor.  That way you have the security of knowing it is held fast, yet it is available if needed.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Deploying and retrieving an anchor with chain and rode

James Alton
 

Bill and Bill,

  Thanks for the tip about tying the line securing the anchor to the top of the windlass so that it can be seen from the helm, that is a really great idea that I will adopt.  Did you use anything special for the line?  I am just wondering if there could be a chafe issue if this safety line somehow became the only thing holding the anchor?    Bill Rouse has a lot of great ideas like this to share, I miss his regular input on this forum.  So thanks to both of you for this one.

  One more anchor story.  I had designed and built a heavy duty anchor chute to fit my customers stainless plow.  The day before departure on the Millennium Odyssey, the crew arrived and one of the crew placed the anchor on the anchor chute without anything securing it.  Seeing this I strongly suggested that he tie the anchor off but the crew member  insisted that was fine and when he stepped off the boat the anchor self launched into the marina basin.  No problem, the crew member said, we know right where it is, we will just get a diver.  Well the marina basin was originally dredged to be 20+ feet deep and had silted in over the years.  2 divers and half of a day later, no anchor.  Worse, the lost anchor was not a CQR and we could not find an exact replacement in time so he left with an anchor that did not fit the anchor chute properly.  

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On May 3, 2018, at 10:29 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Duane,


On Harmonie we do likewise, except the anchor safety line is permanently attached to the center cleat on one end, and the other end ties to the cleat on top of the windlass.  That way you can easily see—from the helm—that the anchor is secure.  Learned that one here from Bill Rouse...

The safety line also goes through the shank of the anchor, bypassing shackles, and any other bits that might fail.

Last thing on this, when underway, we turn power off to the windlass motor, and tighten the clutch.

I never saw anyone lose a boat from losing an anchor, but I saw someone lose his job after an anchor came undone and his response was...suboptimal.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Eleuthera, Bahamas

---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Kent, 

Sorry to hear of your troubles.  In answer to your question of stowing the main anchor, I always tie a line from the anchor to the large center cleat to hold the anchor in place while underway in lieu of dismounting and stowing the anchor.  That way you have the security of knowing it is held fast, yet it is available if needed.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477