Date   

Cock pit size

Paul Osterberg
 

hello!

would like to order some Sunbrella fabric to make a cover for part of the cockpit when leaving to boat for an extended period. As we are not aboard I wonder if anyone know the with of the cockpit measured along the wind screen, and also the distance from the wind screen to the back side of the captains chair.


Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259


Re: Black Tank Secrets

Gary Wells
 

Thanks, Bill.

I doesn't look like there is much I can do about it other than make sure I've got no leaks after reassembly and maybe limit the use of the head.  I am pretty faithful about a 4-6 month cycle on s
jokers and am now considering adding an in-line manual shutoff for extra peace of mind.  It's all about aging gracefully :)

I can't fathom how big a project replacing the black tank will be!  I know that there are SMs that have had tanks added, but methinks that to tear into the factory build will be a mess no matter how it's done. 
 
Until then, it's just gonna have to suffice :)

Best wishes!

Gary W.
sm209, Adagio


Wind or Water generator

Paul Osterberg
 

We have 850 watt of solar power that covers our need when at anchor, even a partly cloudy day. But during passage at night we need to run the Genset something that take away some of the joy of sailing.

I have been thinking of installing a wind generator as we are going to spend a few seasons in the Caribbean where it is not uncommon with strong wind and cloud days. But hopefully we will also cross the Pacific and I assume more or less following wind and the wind generator will not contribute very much.

Does anyone of you out there have any experience with the Watt and Sea or the Swi-Tec hydro generators. Or any other brand? Pros and cons with hydro generators? For you who have both Hydro and Water generators what would be your first choice?


Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

carcodespam@...
 

Sorry Mark, my signature was not included in my message.
Yes, correct, the mastlift is expensive. I once bought it second hand for half of the new price and because I own the Sharki i have the small version 12 meters of the mastlift only.
After all I like it because I don't need a second person, it is very safe and usable for other tasks also.

Gerhard
Sharki #80


Re: : [Amel Yacht Owners] Spare Parts list /

Olaf Bauer MIA-AMARA at Yahoo <olaf_renos@...>
 

Hello Eric,

 

You’re right and thanks for the list.

 

I will sail back to Cape Verde next year. Then West Afrika, Brazil, Argentinian and probably South Africa. So, I guess I need a little bit more than usually 😉

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: 05 April 2018 01:44
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: : [Amel Yacht Owners] Spare Parts list /

 

 

 

Hi Olaf,

The spares you have on board  depend how much offshore sailing you will be doing.

I sail about 80 % offshore.

I have Raymarine instruments so they might be different than what you need.

 

I have the following:

autopilot course computer

rudder reference transducer

fluxgate compass

wind instrument and mast anemometer

depth instrument

spare GPS system

spare VHF system and hand pieces.

2 vhf antennas mast mounted, I use one for the AIS but I can use a splitter if one goes out

2 autopilots one on the rudder stock and one behind the wheel

3 multi instruments that read all the boats instruments a remote hand held autopilot controller that I can plug in if needed which also displays all the boats data a second autopilot control head mounted at the nav station.

 

That are the spares for mounted electronics that I recall.

 

With respect to boat spares. I have every motor and pump used on the boat except for the bow thruster Motor. I keep that spare as well as a complete bow thruster at home.

 

I have every part for both the genset and engine, all hoses, gaskets, and senders on board.

Fan belts, spare of all 3 alternators, starter motors etc etc.

Basically if it can be changed by me I have it.

I also have a large inventory of fasteners, switches, plumbing components, hoses, rudder nut and packing, Wire, stove spares, refrigeration spares, and too many more  things to mention.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 6:17 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Spare Parts list / outside bulbs for SM2K

 

 

 

Hello SM2K owners,

 

As some of you already knows I bought some weeks ago a SM2K.

 

Now I would like to know the required spare parts. Would you pls share your spare parts list with me to get a feeling what parts are required.

 

I also would like to know which bulbs () are installed/used outside (Watt, Size etc.), e.g. for the navigation light, anchor lights, deck light etc. Does anyone of you have list of all the bulbs?

 

Thanks so much in advance

 

Olaf

S/V Sayonara II, SM2K 392

currently in Martinique

 


For Sale, Super Maramu # 180

tango708@...
 

Hello Group,
Rebecca and I have decided to sell our SM, Anni Bea True.  She is an exceptionally well cared for vessel my myself and previous owners.  She has been re-powered with a Yanmar 110 hp turbo diesel and the rigging was replaced in 2016.  She is currently in Martinique and available for viewing.  I will be happy to send information out to interested parties.  I can be reached at 206.841.9556 or at wtstout at mac dot com.



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

Courtney Gorman
 

Guys when a company is run by one man with a vision you get a Super Maramu.  When a new president or CEO comes along you get a change, ALWAYS they want to make their own mark!  The 50 is that mark.  The leadership is now different as are their goals.  Things will not go back under the present leadership so we need to accept this and make the BEST of it.  Be positive and supportive if you have the opportunity but you don’t HAVE to buy a 50
Cheers 
Courtney 
sv Trippin 
Marin


On Apr 5, 2018, at 2:55 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Ian and Judy,

Note my last sentence." However I guess the yard has assessed the market and that's where they think its going" I hope you are not suggesting that to survive they must drop their standards to that of the mass production Beneteau, Bavaria etc that creak and groan their way through offshore seaways..

Oyster died through the keel falling off one 85 foot luxury boat and their refusal to listen to the owners concerns over two yeas as the noises from below increased. 

In the 50 I saw an Amel  quality build for the inshore market, but not a boat for shorthanded world cruising. My hope expressed was that Amel not abandon the world cruising market. In that hope I looked for a smaller boat than the 55 which in comparison to the SM is huge. A boat the size of the SM would fill the slot well and obviously be less expensive without abandoning the quality build. However I will again finish with:  "However I guess the yard has assessed the market and that's where they think its going".

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 06 April 2018 at 00:16 "Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 






 

Hi Jean and Danny,


 I think Jean's points are well made. Unfortunately ( or fortunately for many) the relative costs per foot of a yacht have come down significantly with the advent of industrial production such as that of Bavaria, Hanse etc. I suspect that Amel would now struggle to build a yacht to an SM standard  at a price that allows it  to find a steady market, hence the move to a marine hopper .

 From a purely selfish point of view " whatever floats your boat " ie I am delighted if Amel has found a market which allows them to prosper ( and thus provide me with spares for ever ).

 Few quality and bespoke builders last for ever--see Oyster at the moment.


Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece



From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 01 April 2018 19:46:56
To: 'Jean Boucharlat' jean.boucharlat@... [amelyachtowners]
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review
 

Hi Jean,
We visited the yard in July last year and they were preparing to launch the first 50. We were given a full tour of the boat (and the yard). In my opinion it is unquestionably not designed for a couple to sail round the world, for all the reasons you mention.
We asked the Amel people and the reply was that the target market was for Amel owners who love the brand but have done with off shore. It is a beautiful example of what I call a marina hopper. Luxurious accommodation. Huge saloon for entertainment. Luxury everywhere you look. No doubt it is a market that will meet many peoples desires. However I hope they keep building the 55 or the world will lose the best shorthanded ocean going brand available. Since I could never afford the 55 I would like them to remember the thousands of owners of ageing amels who would love an affordable (even pre owned) option. It has to be an ever lasting market. How about an updated SM or 54. However I guess the yard has assessed the market and that's where they think its going.
Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 1 Apr 2018 9:46 p.m., "'Jean Boucha rlat' jean.boucharlat@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 

 

Dear All,

 

This is my take on the new Amel 50:

 

I am yet to read the article in Yachting World but would agree very much with everything Pip Hare is reported to have said. She is an extremely competent and courageous sailor but, unfortunately, she is not the right person to assess a cruising boat.

 

As to my credentials: over the years I have owned 4 boats, two of them bought new from Amel, a Maramu in October 1981 and a SM in July 1998. Both were the best boats I ever owned or sailed on and I am a great fan of the Amel philosophy. The basic tenet of this philosophy is that a boat should take good care of whoever is on board. This breaks down into two components, at sea, be safe and reasonably comfortable, at anchor, be comfortable and relatively easy to maintain and, in both situations be, as much as possible, not dependent on shore facilities.

 

Now, twice I went to La Rochelle to be given a tour of the new 50 and I came out saying to the yard management that I would not buy one. I agre e that she is very well built, like all past Amels, and she is more “modern” in many respects than her predecessors, but, in reality, she is a luxurious Beneteau, good for extended week-end sailing but not much more. Why? Here are my gripes:

 

1) Rig: she is a singlesticker, not a good choice for any cruising boat over 45 feet. One loses too much in terms of versatility of sail combinations. On top of it she has a self-tacking staysail. Ridiculous!

 

2) Cockpit: not one single locker in the cockpit, where the SM had 3. When at sea if one needs a rope, a shackle, a bucket, a block, anything, one has to fetch them from the lazarette. Unacceptabl e! Henri Amel was adamant that anyone could sail his boats without ever having to leave the safety of the cockpit.

 

3) Hull shape: in line with current architects thinking (could it be a fad?), the 50 has a very wide stern and two side rudders. No skegs, very exposed both to flotsam and to submerged lines particularly in Med style marina moorings. Also, maneuverability in reverse suffers considerably even with a bow-thruster.

 

4) Layout:

- Cabins: too many of them, on a 50 footer you don’t need 3 cabins and you certainly do not need two of them with centerline berths. Here again, Henri Amel considered that his boats should not be dormitories but should accommodate, on any tack, about 3 people sleeping plus one on watch. On the 50, at sea, only the rear cabin center berth can realistically be used. Do you want to have to sleep there with anyone else than your wife or girl friend?

- Saloon: wide and beautiful at anchor, wide and treacherous at sea. Not one single handhold to help you keep your balance.

- Kitchen: now located in the passageway to the rear cabin. This does away with the most comfortable berth at sea, puts the cook in a hot and stuffy area at a distance from the cockpit and makes for an athwart-ships drawer-fridge that will not open on port tack and will spill all of its contents on starboard tack.

- Sump: was unpleasant but relatively easy to access on Maramu’s and SM’s, became more awkward on the 54 and is well nigh impossible on the 50. Quite a few issues looming down there in the dark!

 

OK, so I am an old curmudgeon, but I loved my Amel’s, admired the yard and made friends with many terrific people there . Over the past 10 years, starting with the 55, sadly I have seen the yard drifting away from the principles established by Henri Amel. I consider this a terrible loss to the cruising community as I do not know of any other yard in the world building any boat coming close to the concept ant the quality of the Amel’s of the past.

 

Requiescat in pace,

 

Jean Boucharlat

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: samedi 31 mars 2018 1 3:45
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

 

 

Hi All,

 

 There is a great review of the Amel 50 in April's Yachting World--she's on the front cover as well.

 

The reviewer is Pip Hare. We first met Pip in Piriapolis , Uruguay, where she had sailed two handed in The Shed,  an Oyster 37 which had seen better days. She decided to do the OSTAR, the single-handed transatlantic race, so she sailed back singlehanded from Uruguay to UK and set off on the race. Somewhere to the west of Ireland a lower shroud parted. Mast swaying,  she nursed the boat back to a bay on the south cost of Ireland where her father rowed out to her with a new stay. She wasn't allowed shore assistance beyond that ,so she had to rerig the boat herself . She set off in pursuit of her class who by now had 2-3 days lead on her. She overhauled most of them.

 Pip went on to compete  successfully in those crazy 30 footers which the French love, on races like the Route du Rhum and is probably at her happiest single handed in mid-Atlantic up to her waist in cold sea water, in the dark,  in the cockpit having just broached while trying to maintain 17 knots when her competitors have eased back to 10.

 

 So, you might wonder what on earth she would make of the Amel 50.  It was December,  dark, wet and windy off La Rochelle. She confesses that did feel overdressed sitting in the cockpit in her salopettes and seaboots ( remember them ?) with warmth rising from the saloon together with the aroma of bread and fresh coffee...

 

 Her conclusion:  " I can't sit on the fence about the Amel 50; it's a brilliant boat.........I arrived with some heavy preconceptions, perhaps about as much as the kind of sailor I am as the kind of boat I would be sailing. I was treated to the full Amel experience.... but if you take away the fine food, endless expressos and crisp white bed linen, the Amel still shines. It sails well, it is beautifully built and it made me smile. I left surprised and ever so slightly in love "

 

 Praise indeed ! I think the La Rochelle yard is going to be very busy.

 

 Ian and Judy,

 Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece

 

 



 
 

 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] photos of genset

 

Eric,

I think that you are referring to the Onan optional isolated ground Part number 307−1617 1 Relay, Solenoid as shown in the following photo:





Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 2:07 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hi,

I am trying to get an answer from Onan about the isolated ground solenoid on my MDKAV generator. Unfortunately I am not on Kimberlite.

Would someone be kind enough to take a few photos of the isolated ground solenoid mounted on the pan of the generator on the outboard side . It is below the starter motor. The more photos the merrier.

 

Hopefully they are photos from a generator on a Super Maramu close to my hull number 376.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 



silicone for ealing genoa tracks

eric freedman
 

I just got off the phone with general electric silicone division technical support..

I spoke with them about plugging the holes in the genoa track.

 

They recommended GE SCS2002 sealant—reading the data sheet-looks like this is the stuff.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Cleaning rust stains

 

To add a few things that I have learned.

The VERY IMPORTANT thing about using acid is it will remove the chrome from chrome plated bronze turnbuckles and winches. If left on Stainless Steel it will etch it making it look cloudy. When using acid rinse it with volumes of fresh water.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 1:29 PM, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Agree with Craig on the GOOF ( or is it Goop Off? ) OFF product. In North America, there  also a laundry product for removing rust from clothes and toilet bowls and such called WHINK. It is a dilute solution of hydrofluoric acid, comes in a dark brown plastic bottle and is usually found in the laundry isle in supermarkets. WEAR GLOVES!!!!

DO NOT get any of this stuff, or any hydrofluoric product on your fingernails. At first you will feel nothing, by the time in tingles, your fingernails will be well on the way to melting. I am not being silly, I have seen this happen twice and the pain is described as being almost intolerable. Heavy duty industrial strength gloves, not latex exam gloves. Whink says not to use it on stainless. My experience leads me to sayl that it works fine on bright/polished stainless but leaves an etching on textured stainless such as a wash basin and the like.

 

All The Best, Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2018 10:21 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Cleaning rust stains

 

 

Right, John, those tiny rust dots are a real pain.  I've always tackled them with Muriatic acid (aka hydrochloric, aka concrete cleaner, etc..) which works very well. Recently I came across a "Goof Off" brand rust remover that's 1% hydroflouric acid and 10% oxalyic acid. Just put it on (brush, pour, rag, whatever) and in about 5 minutes the rust is gone - no scrubbing.  Rinse and the acid neutralizes instantly. Also works great on any other areas with rust stain. Seemed to be more effective and faster than the hydrochloric.

Cheers, Craig SN#68

 

---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, <john.biohead@...> wrote :

Welcome to the group, and a word about changing brushes on the furling drives; on my SM the brushes have a ferric componant as eell as carbon.  After working on them clean tje deck ...and all topside well lest you will be cleaning tiny rust marks for a month...ask me how I know this....

 

Regards,  John

 

John Clark

SV Annie SM 37

Emerald Bay Exuma.

 

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018, 12:02 PM cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...> wrote:

Great, thanks! Exactly what I was looking for.

 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] photos of genset

eric freedman
 

Ps,

Please email them to me at the email address at the end of the page.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2018 3:08 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] photos of genset

 

 

Hi,

I am trying to get an answer from Onan about the isolated ground solenoid on my MDKAV generator. Unfortunately I am not on Kimberlite.

Would someone be kind enough to take a few photos of the isolated ground solenoid mounted on the pan of the generator on the outboard side . It is below the starter motor. The more photos the merrier.

 

Hopefully they are photos from a generator on a Super Maramu close to my hull number 376.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 


photos of genset

eric freedman
 

Hi,

I am trying to get an answer from Onan about the isolated ground solenoid on my MDKAV generator. Unfortunately I am not on Kimberlite.

Would someone be kind enough to take a few photos of the isolated ground solenoid mounted on the pan of the generator on the outboard side . It is below the starter motor. The more photos the merrier.

 

Hopefully they are photos from a generator on a Super Maramu close to my hull number 376.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 


Re: Fw: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Ian and Judy,

Note my last sentence." However I guess the yard has assessed the market and that's where they think its going" I hope you are not suggesting that to survive they must drop their standards to that of the mass production Beneteau, Bavaria etc that creak and groan their way through offshore seaways..

Oyster died through the keel falling off one 85 foot luxury boat and their refusal to listen to the owners concerns over two yeas as the noises from below increased. 

In the 50 I saw an Amel  quality build for the inshore market, but not a boat for shorthanded world cruising. My hope expressed was that Amel not abandon the world cruising market. In that hope I looked for a smaller boat than the 55 which in comparison to the SM is huge. A boat the size of the SM would fill the slot well and obviously be less expensive without abandoning the quality build. However I will again finish with:  "However I guess the yard has assessed the market and that's where they think its going".

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 06 April 2018 at 00:16 "Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 






 

Hi Jean and Danny,


 I think Jean's points are well made. Unfortunately ( or fortunately for many) the relative costs per foot of a yacht have come down significantly with the advent of industrial production such as that of Bavaria, Hanse etc. I suspect that Amel would now struggle to build a yacht to an SM standard  at a price that allows it  to find a steady market, hence the move to a marine hopper .

 From a purely selfish point of view " whatever floats your boat " ie I am delighted if Amel has found a market which allows them to prosper ( and thus provide me with spares for ever ).

 Few quality and bespoke builders last for ever--see Oyster at the moment.


Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece



From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 01 April 2018 19:46:56
To: 'Jean Boucharlat' jean.boucharlat@... [amelyachtowners]
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review
 

Hi Jean,
We visited the yard in July last year and they were preparing to launch the first 50. We were given a full tour of the boat (and the yard). In my opinion it is unquestionably not designed for a couple to sail round the world, for all the reasons you mention.
We asked the Amel people and the reply was that the target market was for Amel owners who love the brand but have done with off shore. It is a beautiful example of what I call a marina hopper. Luxurious accommodation. Huge saloon for entertainment. Luxury everywhere you look. No doubt it is a market that will meet many peoples desires. However I hope they keep building the 55 or the world will lose the best shorthanded ocean going brand available. Since I could never afford the 55 I would like them to remember the thousands of owners of ageing amels who would love an affordable (even pre owned) option. It has to be an ever lasting market. How about an updated SM or 54. However I guess the yard has assessed the market and that's where they think its going.
Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 1 Apr 2018 9:46 p.m., "'Jean Boucharlat' jean.boucharlat@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 

 

Dear All,

 

This is my take on the new Amel 50:

 

I am yet to read the article in Yachting World but would agree very much with everything Pip Hare is reported to have said. She is an extremely competent and courageous sailor but, unfortunately, she is not the right person to assess a cruising boat.

 

As to my credentials: over the years I have owned 4 boats, two of them bought new from Amel, a Maramu in October 1981 and a SM in July 1998. Both were the best boats I ever owned or sailed on and I am a great fan of the Amel philosophy. The basic tenet of this philosophy is that a boat should take good care of whoever is on board. This breaks down into two components, at sea, be safe and reasonably comfortable, at anchor, be comfortable and relatively easy to maintain and, in both situations be, as much as possible, not dependent on shore facilities.

 

Now, twice I went to La Rochelle to be given a tour of the new 50 and I came out saying to the yard management that I would not buy one. I agree that she is very well built, like all past Amels, and she is more “modern” in many respects than her predecessors, but, in reality, she is a luxurious Beneteau, good for extended week-end sailing but not much more. Why? Here are my gripes:

 

1) Rig: she is a singlesticker, not a good choice for any cruising boat over 45 feet. One loses too much in terms of versatility of sail combinations. On top of it she has a self-tacking staysail. Ridiculous!

 

2) Cockpit: not one single locker in the cockpit, where the SM had 3. When at sea if one needs a rope, a shackle, a bucket, a block, anything, one has to fetch them from the lazarette. Unacceptable! Henri Amel was adamant that anyone could sail his boats without ever having to leave the safety of the cockpit.

 

3) Hull shape: in line with current architects thinking (could it be a fad?), the 50 has a very wide stern and two side rudders. No skegs, very exposed both to flotsam and to submerged lines particularly in Med style marina moorings. Also, maneuverability in reverse suffers considerably even with a bow-thruster.

 

4) Layout:

- Cabins: too many of them, on a 50 footer you don’t need 3 cabins and you certainly do not need two of them with centerline berths. Here again, Henri Amel considered that his boats should not be dormitories but should accommodate, on any tack, about 3 people sleeping plus one on watch. On the 50, at sea, only the rear cabin center berth can realistically be used. Do you want to have to sleep there with anyone else than your wife or girl friend?

- Saloon: wide and beautiful at anchor, wide and treacherous at sea. Not one single handhold to help you keep your balance.

- Kitchen: now located in the passageway to the rear cabin. This does away with the most comfortable berth at sea, puts the cook in a hot and stuffy area at a distance from the cockpit and makes for an athwart-ships drawer-fridge that will not open on port tack and will spill all of its contents on starboard tack.

- Sump: was unpleasant but relatively easy to access on Maramu’s and SM’s, became more awkward on the 54 and is well nigh impossible on the 50. Quite a few issues looming down there in the dark!

 

OK, so I am an old curmudgeon, but I loved my Amel’s, admired the yard and made friends with many terrific people there . Over the past 10 years, starting with the 55, sadly I have seen the yard drifting away from the principles established by Henri Amel. I consider this a terrible loss to the cruising community as I do not know of any other yard in the world building any boat coming close to the concept ant the quality of the Amel’s of the past.

 

Requiescat in pace,

 

Jean Boucharlat

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: samedi 31 mars 2018 13:45
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

 

 

Hi All,

 

 There is a great review of the Amel 50 in April's Yachting World--she's on the front cover as well.

 

The reviewer is Pip Hare. We first met Pip in Piriapolis , Uruguay, where she had sailed two handed in The Shed,  an Oyster 37 which had seen better days. She decided to do the OSTAR, the single-handed transatlantic race, so she sailed back singlehanded from Uruguay to UK and set off on the race. Somewhere to the west of Ireland a lower shroud parted. Mast swaying,  she nursed the boat back to a bay on the south cost of Ireland where her father rowed out to her with a new stay. She wasn't allowed shore assistance beyond that ,so she had to rerig the boat herself . She set off in pursuit of her class who by now had 2-3 days lead on her. She overhauled most of them.

 Pip went on to compete  successfully in those crazy 30 footers which the French love, on races like the Route du Rhum and is probably at her happiest single handed in mid-Atlantic up to her waist in cold sea water, in the dark,  in the cockpit having just broached while trying to maintain 17 knots when her competitors have eased back to 10.

 

 So, you might wonder what on earth she would make of the Amel 50.  It was December,  dark, wet and windy off La Rochelle. She confesses that did feel overdressed sitting in the cockpit in her salopettes and seaboots ( remember them ?) with warmth rising from the saloon together with the aroma of bread and fresh coffee...

 

 Her conclusion:  " I can't sit on the fence about the Amel 50; it's a brilliant boat.........I arrived with some heavy preconceptions, perhaps about as much as the kind of sailor I am as the kind of boat I would be sailing. I was treated to the full Amel experience.... but if you take away the fine food, endless expressos and crisp white bed linen, the Amel still shines. It sails well, it is beautifully built and it made me smile. I left surprised and ever so slightly in love "

 

 Praise indeed ! I think the La Rochelle yard is going to be very busy.

 

 Ian and Judy,

 Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece

 

 



 
 

 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Cleaning rust stains

amelforme
 

Agree with Craig on the GOOF ( or is it Goop Off? ) OFF product. In North America, there  also a laundry product for removing rust from clothes and toilet bowls and such called WHINK. It is a dilute solution of hydrofluoric acid, comes in a dark brown plastic bottle and is usually found in the laundry isle in supermarkets. WEAR GLOVES!!!!

DO NOT get any of this stuff, or any hydrofluoric product on your fingernails. At first you will feel nothing, by the time in tingles, your fingernails will be well on the way to melting. I am not being silly, I have seen this happen twice and the pain is described as being almost intolerable. Heavy duty industrial strength gloves, not latex exam gloves. Whink says not to use it on stainless. My experience leads me to sayl that it works fine on bright/polished stainless but leaves an etching on textured stainless such as a wash basin and the like.

 

All The Best, Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2018 10:21 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Cleaning rust stains

 

 

Right, John, those tiny rust dots are a real pain.  I've always tackled them with Muriatic acid (aka hydrochloric, aka concrete cleaner, etc.) which works very well. Recently I came across a "Goof Off" brand rust remover that's 1% hydroflouric acid and 10% oxalyic acid. Just put it on (brush, pour, rag, whatever) and in about 5 minutes the rust is gone - no scrubbing.  Rinse and the acid neutralizes instantly. Also works great on any other areas with rust stain. Seemed to be more effective and faster than the hydrochloric.

Cheers, Craig SN#68

 

---In amelyachtowners@..., <john.biohead@...> wrote :

Welcome to the group, and a word about changing brushes on the furling drives; on my SM the brushes have a ferric componant as eell as carbon.  After working on them clean tje deck ...and all topside well lest you will be cleaning tiny rust marks for a month...ask me how I know this....

 

Regards,  John

 

John Clark

SV Annie SM 37

Emerald Bay Exuma.

 

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018, 12:02 PM cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...> wrote:

Great, thanks! Exactly what I was looking for.

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Black Tank Secrets

 

Gary,

I have been monitoring this process on ADAGIO since you began the effort. So far, I would say, "Great Job!"

I have wondered about exactly how the "fill tube" extends to near the top of the tank, but I have no idea exactly how it is made, nor am I sure about how many versions of the black water tank exist in the total production of the SM...things may vary from hull number to hull number. The things I am mostly sure about are:
  1. The "filling tube" extends to the top because if it did not, when the joker valve fails, the entire contents of the black water tank will drain into the toilet, probably overfilling the toilet into the shower and eventually into the gray water tank.
  2. The exit tube/valve is directly below the pump-out port on the deck.
  3. We should expect the life of the black water tank to be about 20 years, but that will shorten proportionally to the quantity of chemicals added to the flush water.
  4. Joker Valves will fail and the life of most Joker Valves is about 4-5 years, also shortened proportionally to the quantity of chemicals added to the flush water.
  5. Because of #4 above, and if you do not want the entire black water tank overflowing into your toilet, shower, and gray water tank; change the Joker Valve in 2-3 years.
  6. None of this is fun.
Good luck and keep us posted. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 11:53 AM, gary@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello all!


I have been replacing the copper pipe nipple thingies in both black tanks.  Three out of four of the copper inserts came out without too much of a fight.  On two of the copper pipes, leaks had developed from a crack that had developed at the point where the bonding wire is clamped on. From that point, the cracks expanded and ran up into the fiberglass of the tank.


The fourth and final piece of copper did not yield. It would not budge for quite a while, but eventually broke free for just a small amount of motion. The piece would wiggle, and move up and down maybe 1/2 inch but it refused to come free. 


Finally, after several hours of bending, pounding < /span>screwdrivers between the copper and the glass, vise grips and channel locks of various sizes I finally got it to break free.  Well, actually, it tore free. What I had in hand was apparently not the complete tube. It seem that this one, unlike the others, runs completely through the tank's 'nipple' and is attached via a hose clamp to a pipe/sanitation hose that is inside the tank.


I remember from the sm2000 diagram that there was an internal 'lifting' pipe but I don't think I saw it a attached to the copper tubing.  At any rate, I have most of the copper tube out but the internal piece, which is still attached to a hose of some sort, won't be coming out. It is just not possible to reach it through the bottom of the tank and I'm pretty sure there's no other access.


I got the inspection mirror up there and it looks like that hose is displaced, but not a significant block.  I'm suspicious that it may have been partially detached for quite a while already...


My initial assessment is that there's nothing I can do about it.  I also think that it shouldn't present too much of a problem in the short run so I'm not ready to run off to find a repair solution right now. 


When we get to Martinique next Spring I will talk it through with the fine folks at Amel.


My question is whether or not anyone has run into this before, if anyone knows if this is "standard" construction (I noticed that s/v D elos had no such problem during their recent episode with a similar problem).


Now to start the cleanout/cleanup process! :)


Best wishes!


Gary W.

sm #209, "Adagio"

Fethiye, Turkey ... prepping for ARC 2018

 



Black Tank Secrets

Gary Wells
 

Hello all!


I have been replacing the copper pipe nipple thingies in both black tanks.  Three out of four of the copper inserts came out without too much of a fight.  On two of the copper pipes, leaks had developed from a crack that had developed at the point where the bonding wire is clamped on. From that point, the cracks expanded and ran up into the fiberglass of the tank.


The fourth and final piece of copper did not yield. It would not budge for quite a while, but eventually broke free for just a small amount of motion. The piece would wiggle, and move up and down maybe 1/2 inch but it refused to come free. 


Finally, after several hours of bending, pounding screwdrivers between the copper and the glass, vise grips and channel locks of various sizes I finally got it to break free.  Well, actually, it tore free. What I had in hand was apparently not the complete tube. It seem that this one, unlike the others, runs completely through the tank's 'nipple' and is attached via a hose clamp to a pipe/sanitation hose that is inside the tank.


I remember from the sm2000 diagram that there was an internal 'lifting' pipe but I don't think I saw it a attached to the copper tubing.  At any rate, I have most of the copper tube out but the internal piece, which is still attached to a hose of some sort, won't be coming out. It is just not possible to reach it through the bottom of the tank and I'm pretty sure there's no other access.


I got the inspection mirror up there and it looks like that hose is displaced, but not a significant block.  I'm suspicious that it may have been partially detached for quite a while already...


My initial assessment is that there's nothing I can do about it.  I also think that it shouldn't present too much of a problem in the short run so I'm not ready to run off to find a repair solution right now. 


When we get to Martinique next Spring I will talk it through with the fine folks at Amel.


My question is whether or not anyone has run into this before, if anyone knows if this is "standard" construction (I noticed that s/v Delos had no such problem during their recent episode with a similar problem).


Now to start the cleanout/cleanup process! :)


Best wishes!


Gary W.

sm #209, "Adagio"

Fethiye, Turkey ... prepping for ARC 2018

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Galapagos/Marquesas and Panama shipping

Porter McRoberts
 

Thanks James. 
I will be certain to let everyone know!  

Another question for the forum


I am ordering sails from Q sails. 

Has anyone received shipments in Panama?  Can anyone confirm they are indeed tax free?

Where is the best place to receive shipments in Panama?  

Always appreciated. 

Porter McRoberts
S/V Ibis  54-152
Martinique. 



Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Apr 5, 2018, at 7:51 AM, James Cromie jamescromie@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Porter - Some on this forum, including myself, will be very interested to hear what you find out when you apply for your visas in Panama. We would like to pursue a similar itinerary eventually. 


Thank you for the posts. 
James
Soteria 
SM 347


On Apr 3, 2018, at 8:17 AM, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thank you Steve. All excellent points. 

I think we’ll know if we get the visa while in Panama, If not. We’ll then delay on the American continent. 
We’ve also considered the gambier islands for part of the time as well. Less rolly. Further south and outside the cyclone belt. Less heat. 
So it seems. 

Thanks for your thoughtful reply!

Porter


Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Mar 30, 2018, at 11:16 AM, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Porter,

I wish I had good answers, but instead have some questions. 

Are you fairly certain a 1 year visa is possible? Rene is Dutch, and his wife is Canadian. I wonder if he was able to get his wife a 1 yr visa due to the fact that he is an EU citizen. I had always heard the long stay visa for Americans was only 6 months instead of the standard 3 we normally get. I’ve also read that after the 2 visits required to the French embassy for the long stay Visa, it is not always granted on the spot, and you may not know if you actually have one until arriving in French Polynesia.  

I’d be a bit hesitant to rely on historic cyclone patterns when on the edge of the cyclone belt, as the weather patterns seem to be changing a bit as the ocean temps are rising. It also seems like a very long time to spend in the Marquesas, and would expect the off season part is going to be seriously hot, humid, and squally. 

We just sailed from Panama to Hawaii instead of our previously planned trip to FP this year to help out with my ill 94 year old father, and hope to Be headed that way via the Line islands in the 2019 season. Good luck with getting it all figured out, and let us all know what you discover. 

Regards,

Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
KoOlina, Hawaii

On Mar 30, 2018, at 04:30, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I very much appreciate all the thoughtful insights in every regard, and so I propose these technical questions.

We are heavily considering a transit of the Canal in June.
We've had extensive discussions with Rene of Island Water World in St. Martin (who some may know) and others who argue for the Pacific approach outlined below.

It is based on 3 assumptions:

1. A US citizen can get a 1 year visa for French Polynesia in Panama at the French consulate there.
2. Entering Equador on the mainland, one can get an extended cruising permit with exit through the Galapagos with minimal fees over an extended time-period.
 and the third:

3. The Marquesas are outside the cyclone zone and should be considered a reasonable all weather destination.

Based on the above, and a fair amount of research on the web etc.  We are considering a transit in June, July.
Heading south along the west coast of S America, leaving the boat in Ecuador for an inland experience, then Galapagos and Marquesas late part of this year.  Early start on the westward cruising of the pacific in march/April 2019 toward New Zealand or Torres Straits.

Noting, while the Marquesas are on the cusp of cyclone territory, their location does not completely exclude them from circular storms, what storm options would we have with good intel.  We have and use iridium and predict wind a-lot with excellent outcomes for the past year. 

What thoughts, considerations, concerns and or advice might you have for this concept?

Very much appreciated!


Porter McRoberts
S/V Ibis: Amel 54-#152
Martinique









Cleaning rust stains

Craig Briggs
 

Right, John, those tiny rust dots are a real pain.  I've always tackled them with Muriatic acid (aka hydrochloric, aka concrete cleaner, etc.) which works very well. Recently I came across a "Goof Off" brand rust remover that's 1% hydroflouric acid and 10% oxalyic acid. Just put it on (brush, pour, rag, whatever) and in about 5 minutes the rust is gone - no scrubbing.  Rinse and the acid neutralizes instantly. Also works great on any other areas with rust stain. Seemed to be more effective and faster than the hydrochloric.

Cheers, Craig SN#68


---In amelyachtowners@..., <john.biohead@...> wrote :

Welcome to the group, and a word about changing brushes on the furling drives; on my SM the brushes have a ferric componant as eell as carbon.  After working on them clean tje deck ...and all topside well lest you will be cleaning tiny rust marks for a month...ask me how I know this....

Regards,  John

John Clark
SV Annie SM 37
Emerald Bay Exuma.

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018, 12:02 PM cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...> wrote:

Great, thanks! Exactly what I was looking for.



Re: Just a bit off topic, but worth saying...

mfmcgovern@...
 

Brent,

As a new-ish Amel SM owner (July 2017) I could not agree with you more!  This forum was one of the tick marks in the "PRO" column when we were deciding which boat to buy.  The depth of knowledge and experience, the willingness to share that knowledge and the genuine "niceness" of the forum members really is extraordinary.  

And if you think it's valuable BEFORE you buy an Amel wait until you own one. It's value is immeasurable!  

Good luck in your search!

Mark
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Introduction and Finding Furling Motor Parts (Amel 54)

John Clark
 

Welcome to the group, and a word about changing brushes on the furling drives; on my SM the brushes have a ferric componant as eell as carbon.  After working on them clean tje deck ...and all topside well lest you will be cleaning tiny rust marks for a month...ask me how I know this....

Regards,  John

John Clark
SV Annie SM 37
Emerald Bay Exuma.

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018, 12:02 PM cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Great, thanks! Exactly what I was looking for.