Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Vetus Coupling Failure [2 Attachments]

Porter McRoberts
 

What’s amazing to me is how supportive Amel: Thierry and Maud are. 
Most excellent representation for a great company. 


On Sep 28, 2018, at 12:39 PM, Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill,

yes of course it was modified by Amel.I had to wait a day for a new batch of couplings to come back from their sub-contractor who does the machining. According to Maud all Vetus couplings are modified before they sell them to their customers, at least for Super Maramu's. Maybe earlier models require something different?

It's still too bloody tight though! The mod is I believe, done to match the shaft on the C-Drive.

Sorry I could not reply earlier but the island's internet has been down most of the day.

Regards

Ian SM2K 414 Crusader Leros


On 27/09/2018 17:01, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 
Ian,

Did you see the PDF I sent you? It clearly shows the machining that Amel normally does to the Vetus coupling before installation. Amel does this to expedite the installation. Was your coupling machined as pictured in the PDF? The reason I am asking is that I think we all want to know, if when ordering the Vetus coupling from Amel, do we need to specify this Amel-Modification in order to have a smooth installation????




Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 8:15 AM Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Whilst on passage from Naxos Greece to Didim Turkey, the following wind
died to such a level that I had to start my Yanmar engine. I smoothly
set 1700 rpm which is my normal maximum other than when doing the
monthly turbo clean as recommended by Amel. About half an hour later
there was a thumping sound  which at first I thought was a rope getting
wrapped around the prop. But the engine did not stall, so unlikely. I
dived over the side and had a look. No rope, net etc and no marks on the
blades.

The Vetus coupling on my boat is somewhat obscured by by the wooden
plinth that sits on the top of the C-Drive support frame. The plinth
supports the water tank that feeds fresh water to my toilets. Looking at
the coupling closely, it was apparent that all four bolts that hold the
two halves of the casing together and to the drive flange on the output
of the gearbox, had sheared. The thumping sound was the rubber blocks
jumping out of their recesses in the casing. On the Yanmar installation
these bolts cannot be replaced without moving the entire engine aft and
sliding the coupling away from the C-Drive, so an at sea repair was out
of the question. I am told that the Volvo installation is easier, but I
never had to do this on my previous boat so I don't know for sure.
Fortunately the wind freshened late in the day and I diverted to Leros
and managed to sail into the anchorage during the night. Two days later
I was towed into Leros marina, where I still am eleven days later.

Not having good enough tools or manpower to move the engine myself, I
made use of the marina mechanics. At the same time I read with concern
the dreadful experiences of Craig and Eric when they tried to remove the
coupling from the C-Drive input shaft. My mechanics experience was no
better. After working on the problem for two days they had succeeded in
moving the shafts apart by no more than 5mm. They said that they would
now have to remove the entire engine to gain enough access to get a
strong enough puller on the job to free the Vetus from the C-Drive. All
this at €50/hour for the labour and €60 per day for the marina. I
suggested they might remove the gearbox from the engine to create enough
space, which they did. Using a heavy duty puller and a 4 foot lever arm
on the compression bolt spanner, the 'Bloody Vetus as Eric named it'
finally came off.

Examining the coupling, the casings looked OK and the rubber blocks were
in not bad shape for an age of 15 years according to the mechanics. The
bolts did not all fail at once, and probably failed due to working loose
or stretching over time. Despite the fact that maybe three bolts were
broken before the final breakdown, there was no noticeable additional
vibration in the transmission even at 3000 rpm that I had used when
clearing the turbo two weeks earlier. Clearly these bolts need to be
examined and checked for tightness on a regular basis.

As the cost of a new coupling was only €297 plus tax and shipping from
Amel, I decided to replace the entire unit for peace of mind. We would
also not have to modify the shaft ourselves to fit the C-Drive. Maud did
a super job with FedEx as far as Athens, but the local courier took far
too long to get the part to Leros. Unfortunately Maud forgot to include
the 4 bolts and nuts, and these are now on the way courtesy of Amel. The
Vetus agent in Greece has no stock! Maybe we could find similar bolts in
a garage for example, but the quality would be uncertain and this is too
crucial an item to risk your boat for.

So why is the coupling to difficult to remove? Like Eric found, the
modified shaft is simply machined to too tight a fit. There is no way
the new coupling will slide on the C-Drive shaft as it comes even though
the C-Drive shaft is in good condition. It would need a press to install
it. It's a keyed fitting and not an interference fit so it should be a
push fit. Like Eric, I have spent considerable time reducing the C-Drive
shaft diameter with wet and dry until the new coupling is a snug hand
fit. Assembled with Corrosion Block grease, next time it should be easy
to remove.

It's the same story with the outhaul capstan drive shaft. It's made too
tight. If you rub it down till it slides in easily, you will not end up
breaking your gearbox trying to remove it. The same again for my
bowthruster tube to drive motor housing. It used to be a devil to
separate. Having opened up the motor recess slightly with a Dremel and
an abrasive wheel, it is no longer a problem. Whilst I have every
confidence in Amel's sub contractors following Amel's design exactly,
the fact is in the corrosive real world we operate in, the tolerances
need to be made greater if we are to avoid going through nightmare
maintenance issues such as these.

Finally, I should point out that unbelievably when you buy a Vetus
coupling from Vetus, the bolts that hold the dammed thing together are
NOT included! You will need to order a SET64 kit separately if you have
a 4" gearbox flange. A SET65 if you have a 5" one. Amel, being a good
company DO include these bolts when you buy from them, but it may be
worthwhile reminding them at order time to make sure they include them
in the box.

To anyone contemplating removing their Vetus coupling from the C-Drive,
be prepared for a difficult time.

Regards and good luck.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 Crusader Leros Greece



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Coupling Failure

Ian Shepherd
 


Yes Alan you are right. I always use Loctite on every nut on the boat, preferring 270 on the critical ones. Even if the nuts don't come loose, the bolts will stretch over time. I use the engine very little but I will make a note to check those bolts at the beginning of each month.

Best regards

Ian SM2K 414 Crusader Leros Greece


On 28/09/2018 00:02, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 

Those coupling bolts need checking on a regular basis.

I have heard of numerous "bolt shearing" episodes over the years and I'm sure they have all been caused by the bolts coming loose.
There are discussions on the forum about this.
I check the bolt tightness about once every month, and especially after a long session of motoring.
Even with Nyloc nuts they come loose.
At the suggestion of another forum member we now have Loctitie Thread Lock on the bolts as well....we'll see how that goes.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
Bonne Anse



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Vetus Coupling Failure

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi Eric,

thanks for the tip. My worry about your method is that the heads of the bolts will be compressing the threaded clamp on the face of the C-Drive and maybe might even crack it? It seems risky to me, especially considering how tight my coupling was. I seem to remember you cursing how long it took even with the suggested method. Nice idea though.

Yes I have already obtained a good hand fit by rubbing down the C-Drive shaft a few thou with wet and dry. I am still nursing the blisters on the palm of my hand!

I would rather put thread on the each end of a steel bar than use threaded rod. That way the inside of the holes in the aluminium casings with not be subject to abrasion from the threads. As my bow thruster experienced!

Regards

Ian SM2K 414 CRusader


On 28/09/2018 05:27, eric kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 
The easiest way to separate the Vetus coupling from the C drive is to use a  few bolts cut down to exactly the size of the gap. Put three of these around the gap and use a nut on the end of the bolt and open it up with 2 wrenches to open up the space. It is only  or 5 mm. With a series of longer and longer bolts you will loosen up the coupling.

When you receive the coupling have a machine shot turn the coupling and remove a few thousands of an inch of the inside diameter. It will then be a tight slip fit, add Never Seeze and it will come apart easily next time.

With respect the the coupling bolts cut down threaded rod to the desired length and put a nylock with red locktite on it. 

Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite


On Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 08:23 AM, Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Whilst on passage from Naxos Greece to Didim Turkey, the following wind
died to such a level that I had to start my Yanmar engine. I smoothly
set 1700 rpm which is my normal maximum other than when doing the
monthly turbo clean as recommended by Amel. About half an hour later
there was a thumping sound  which at first I thought was a rope getting
wrapped around the prop. But the engine did not stall, so unlikely. I
dived over the side and had a look. No rope, net etc and no marks on the
blades.

The Vetus coupling on my boat is somewhat obscured by by the wooden
plinth that sits on the top of the C-Drive support frame. The plinth
supports the water tank that feeds fresh water to my toilets. Looking at
the coupling closely, it was apparent that all four bolts that hold the
two halves of the casing together and to the drive flange on the output
of the gearbox, had sheared. The thumping sound was the rubber blocks
jumping out of their recesses in the casing. On the Yanmar installation
these bolts cannot be replaced without moving the entire engine aft and
sliding the coupling away from the C-Drive, so an at sea repair was out
of the question. I am told that the Volvo installation is easier, but I
never had to do this on my previous boat so I don't know for sure.
Fortunately the wind freshened late in the day and I diverted to Leros
and managed to sail into the anchorage during the night. Two days later
I was towed into Leros marina, where I still am eleven days later.

Not having good enough tools or manpower to move the engine myself, I
made use of the marina mechanics. At the same time I read with concern
the dreadful experiences of Craig and Eric when they tried to remove the
coupling from the C-Drive input shaft. My mechanics experience was no
better. After working on the problem for two days they had succeeded in
moving the shafts apart by no more than 5mm. They said that they would
now have to remove the entire engine to gain enough access to get a
strong enough puller on the job to free the Vetus from the C-Drive. All
this at €50/hour for the labour and €60 per day for the marina. I
suggested they might remove the gearbox from the engine to create enough
space, which they did. Using a heavy duty puller and a 4 foot lever arm
on the compression bolt spanner, the 'Bloody Vetus as Eric named it'
finally came off.

Examining the coupling, the casings looked OK and the rubber blocks were
in not bad shape for an age of 15 years according to the mechanics. The
bolts did not all fail at once, and probably failed due to working loose
or stretching over time. Despite the fact that maybe three bolts were
broken before the final breakdown, there was no noticeable additional
vibration in the transmission even at 3000 rpm that I had used when
clearing the turbo two weeks earlier. Clearly these bolts need to be
examined and checked for tightness on a regular basis.

As the cost of a new coupling was only €297 plus tax and shipping from
Amel, I decided to replace the entire unit for peace of mind. We would
also not have to modify the shaft ourselves to fit the C-Drive. Maud did
a super job with FedEx as far as Athens, but the local courier took far
too long to get the part to Leros. Unfortunately Maud forgot to include
the 4 bolts and nuts, and these are now on the way courtesy of Amel. The
Vetus agent in Greece has no stock! Maybe we could find similar bolts in
a garage for example, but the quality would be uncertain and this is too
crucial an item to risk your boat for.

So why is the coupling to difficult to remove? Like Eric found, the
modified shaft is simply machined to too tight a fit. There is no way
the new coupling will slide on the C-Drive shaft as it comes even though
the C-Drive shaft is in good condition. It would need a press to install
it. It's a keyed fitting and not an interference fit so it should be a
push fit. Like Eric, I have spent considerable time reducing the C-Drive
shaft diameter with wet and dry until the new coupling is a snug hand
fit. Assembled with Corrosion Block grease, next time it should be easy
to remove.

It's the same story with the outhaul capstan drive shaft. It's made too
tight. If you rub it down till it slides in easily, you will not end up
breaking your gearbox trying to remove it. The same again for my
bowthruster tube to drive motor housing. It used to be a devil to
separate. Having opened up the motor recess slightly with a Dremel and
an abrasive wheel, it is no longer a problem. Whilst I have every
confidence in Amel's sub contractors following Amel's design exactly,
the fact is in the corrosive real world we operate in, the tolerances
need to be made greater if we are to avoid going through nightmare
maintenance issues such as these.

Finally, I should point out that unbelievably when you buy a Vetus
coupling from Vetus, the bolts that hold the dammed thing together are
NOT included! You will need to order a SET64 kit separately if you have
a 4" gearbox flange. A SET65 if you have a 5" one. Amel, being a good
company DO include these bolts when you buy from them, but it may be
worthwhile reminding them at order time to make sure they include them
in the box.

To anyone contemplating removing their Vetus coupling from the C-Drive,
be prepared for a difficult time.

Regards and good luck.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 Crusader Leros Greece



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Unexplained Explosion On Board

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi Hajo,

as you are a stones throw away, did you have a problem too the other afternoon?

Come over sometime.

Ian B16


On 28/09/2018 08:56, Amw amw08@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 
We had the problem with polarity here in Greece in Thessaloniki, in Lesbos and after one day here in Leros.

Obviously every Marina here in Greece has a different polarity !


Hajo
SM 150 Serafine
Leros Greece



Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 26.09.2018 um 17:17 schrieb greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Ian,


Are the breakers on your 220V panel double pole breakers?  or single pole?

Is it possible that the shore power polarity was reversed? 

Did anyone else on the dock have a problem?

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Galley Refrigerator Malfunction

Jose Venegas
 

Thank you Bill,

My Frigoboat has a Danfoss control 102N4030 which runs the compressor and the fan 
There is a switch with a red light, which seems to control the fan.  When I turned down such a switch down the compressor started, and the freezer is now getting cold but the fan is not running.

Do you know what for is the switch?  Could it be that something is wrong with the control?

I agree that the refrigerator is old, but my experience is those older refrigerators can last forever.  My grandmother refrigerator is still running after more than 60 years of use ;).


Jose


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Vetus Coupling Failure

Ian Shepherd
 

Bill,

yes of course it was modified by Amel.I had to wait a day for a new batch of couplings to come back from their sub-contractor who does the machining. According to Maud all Vetus couplings are modified before they sell them to their customers, at least for Super Maramu's. Maybe earlier models require something different?

It's still too bloody tight though! The mod is I believe, done to match the shaft on the C-Drive.

Sorry I could not reply earlier but the island's internet has been down most of the day.

Regards

Ian SM2K 414 Crusader Leros


On 27/09/2018 17:01, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 
Ian,

Did you see the PDF I sent you? It clearly shows the machining that Amel normally does to the Vetus coupling before installation. Amel does this to expedite the installation. Was your coupling machined as pictured in the PDF? The reason I am asking is that I think we all want to know, if when ordering the Vetus coupling from Amel, do we need to specify this Amel-Modification in order to have a smooth installation????




Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 8:15 AM Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Whilst on passage from Naxos Greece to Didim Turkey, the following wind
died to such a level that I had to start my Yanmar engine. I smoothly
set 1700 rpm which is my normal maximum other than when doing the
monthly turbo clean as recommended by Amel. About half an hour later
there was a thumping sound  which at first I thought was a rope getting
wrapped around the prop. But the engine did not stall, so unlikely. I
dived over the side and had a look. No rope, net etc and no marks on the
blades.

The Vetus coupling on my boat is somewhat obscured by by the wooden
plinth that sits on the top of the C-Drive support frame. The plinth
supports the water tank that feeds fresh water to my toilets. Looking at
the coupling closely, it was apparent that all four bolts that hold the
two halves of the casing together and to the drive flange on the output
of the gearbox, had sheared. The thumping sound was the rubber blocks
jumping out of their recesses in the casing. On the Yanmar installation
these bolts cannot be replaced without moving the entire engine aft and
sliding the coupling away from the C-Drive, so an at sea repair was out
of the question. I am told that the Volvo installation is easier, but I
never had to do this on my previous boat so I don't know for sure.
Fortunately the wind freshened late in the day and I diverted to Leros
and managed to sail into the anchorage during the night. Two days later
I was towed into Leros marina, where I still am eleven days later.

Not having good enough tools or manpower to move the engine myself, I
made use of the marina mechanics. At the same time I read with concern
the dreadful experiences of Craig and Eric when they tried to remove the
coupling from the C-Drive input shaft. My mechanics experience was no
better. After working on the problem for two days they had succeeded in
moving the shafts apart by no more than 5mm. They said that they would
now have to remove the entire engine to gain enough access to get a
strong enough puller on the job to free the Vetus from the C-Drive. All
this at €50/hour for the labour and €60 per day for the marina. I
suggested they might remove the gearbox from the engine to create enough
space, which they did. Using a heavy duty puller and a 4 foot lever arm
on the compression bolt spanner, the 'Bloody Vetus as Eric named it'
finally came off.

Examining the coupling, the casings looked OK and the rubber blocks were
in not bad shape for an age of 15 years according to the mechanics. The
bolts did not all fail at once, and probably failed due to working loose
or stretching over time. Despite the fact that maybe three bolts were
broken before the final breakdown, there was no noticeable additional
vibration in the transmission even at 3000 rpm that I had used when
clearing the turbo two weeks earlier. Clearly these bolts need to be
examined and checked for tightness on a regular basis.

As the cost of a new coupling was only €297 plus tax and shipping from
Amel, I decided to replace the entire unit for peace of mind. We would
also not have to modify the shaft ourselves to fit the C-Drive. Maud did
a super job with FedEx as far as Athens, but the local courier took far
too long to get the part to Leros. Unfortunately Maud forgot to include
the 4 bolts and nuts, and these are now on the way courtesy of Amel. The
Vetus agent in Greece has no stock! Maybe we could find similar bolts in
a garage for example, but the quality would be uncertain and this is too
crucial an item to risk your boat for.

So why is the coupling to difficult to remove? Like Eric found, the
modified shaft is simply machined to too tight a fit. There is no way
the new coupling will slide on the C-Drive shaft as it comes even though
the C-Drive shaft is in good condition. It would need a press to install
it. It's a keyed fitting and not an interference fit so it should be a
push fit. Like Eric, I have spent considerable time reducing the C-Drive
shaft diameter with wet and dry until the new coupling is a snug hand
fit. Assembled with Corrosion Block grease, next time it should be easy
to remove.

It's the same story with the outhaul capstan drive shaft. It's made too
tight. If you rub it down till it slides in easily, you will not end up
breaking your gearbox trying to remove it. The same again for my
bowthruster tube to drive motor housing. It used to be a devil to
separate. Having opened up the motor recess slightly with a Dremel and
an abrasive wheel, it is no longer a problem. Whilst I have every
confidence in Amel's sub contractors following Amel's design exactly,
the fact is in the corrosive real world we operate in, the tolerances
need to be made greater if we are to avoid going through nightmare
maintenance issues such as these.

Finally, I should point out that unbelievably when you buy a Vetus
coupling from Vetus, the bolts that hold the dammed thing together are
NOT included! You will need to order a SET64 kit separately if you have
a 4" gearbox flange. A SET65 if you have a 5" one. Amel, being a good
company DO include these bolts when you buy from them, but it may be
worthwhile reminding them at order time to make sure they include them
in the box.

To anyone contemplating removing their Vetus coupling from the C-Drive,
be prepared for a difficult time.

Regards and good luck.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 Crusader Leros Greece



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Vetus Coupling Failure

Ian Shepherd
 

Hello Porter,

sorry to hear that you are having the same trouble. A propulsion failure in the canal would not be popular, so glad that you have not had the problem there. No luck with the bolts on Leros island, so I will just have to wait for them to arrive from Amel next Wednesday.

Good luck and I hope that you are soon on your way.

Ian SM2K 414 Crusader


On 27/09/2018 16:20, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 

Ian. I am sorry for your troubles. 

Thank you for your detailed explanation!  
Going through a very similar experience here in Panama. 
Very Best of luck as we work together on this issue yet a half world away!

Porter
A54-152

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Sep 27, 2018, at 7:23 AM, Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Whilst on passage from Naxos Greece to Didim Turkey, the following wind
died to such a level that I had to start my Yanmar engine. I smoothly
set 1700 rpm which is my normal maximum other than when doing the
monthly turbo clean as recommended by Amel. About half an hour later
there was a thumping sound  which at first I thought was a rope getting
wrapped around the prop. But the engine did not stall, so unlikely. I
dived over the side and had a look. No rope, net etc and no marks on the
blades.

The Vetus coupling on my boat is somewhat obscured by by the wooden
plinth that sits on the top of the C-Drive support frame. The plinth
supports the water tank that feeds fresh water to my toilets. Looking at
the coupling closely, it was apparent that all four bolts that hold the
two halves of the casing together and to the drive flange on the output
of the gearbox, had sheared. The thumping sound was the rubber blocks
jumping out of their recesses in the casing. On the Yanmar installation
these bolts cannot be replaced without moving the entire engine aft and
sliding the coupling away from the C-Drive, so an at sea repair was out
of the question. I am told that the Volvo installation is easier, but I
never had to do this on my previous boat so I don't know for sure.
Fortunately the wind freshened late in the day and I diverted to Leros
and managed to sail into the anchorage during the night. Two days later
I was towed into Leros marina, where I still am eleven days later.

Not having good enough tools or manpower to move the engine myself, I
made use of the marina mechanics. At the same time I read with concern
the dreadful experiences of Craig and Eric when they tried to remove the
coupling from the C-Drive input shaft. My mechanics experience was no
better. After working on the problem for two days they had succeeded in
moving the shafts apart by no more than 5mm. They said that they would
now have to remove the entire engine to gain enough access to get a
strong enough puller on the job to free the Vetus from the C-Drive. All
this at €50/hour for the labour and €60 per day for the marina. I
suggested they might remove the gearbox from the engine to create enough
space, which they did. Using a heavy duty puller and a 4 foot lever arm
on the compression bolt spanner, the 'Bloody Vetus as Eric named it'
finally came off.

Examining the coupling, the casings looked OK and the rubber blocks were
in not bad shape for an age of 15 years according to the mechanics. The
bolts did not all fail at once, and probably failed due to working loose
or stretching over time. Despite the fact that maybe three bolts were
broken before the final breakdown, there was no noticeable additional
vibration in the transmission even at 3000 rpm that I had used when
clearing the turbo two weeks earlier. Clearly these bolts need to be
examined and checked for tightness on a regular basis.

As the cost of a new coupling was only €297 plus tax and shipping from
Amel, I decided to replace the entire unit for peace of mind. We would
also not have to modify the shaft ourselves to fit the C-Drive. Maud did
a super job with FedEx as far as Athens, but the local courier took far
too long to get the part to Leros. Unfortunately Maud forgot to include
the 4 bolts and nuts, and these are now on the way courtesy of Amel. The
Vetus agent in Greece has no stock! Maybe we could find similar bolts in
a garage for example, but the quality would be uncertain and this is too
crucial an item to risk your boat for.

So why is the coupling to difficult to remove? Like Eric found, the
modified shaft is simply machined to too tight a fit. There is no way
the new coupling will slide on the C-Drive shaft as it comes even though
the C-Drive shaft is in good condition. It would need a press to install
it. It's a keyed fitting and not an interference fit so it should be a
push fit. Like Eric, I have spent considerable time reducing the C-Drive
shaft diameter with wet and dry until the new coupling is a snug hand
fit. Assembled with Corrosion Block grease, next time it should be easy
to remove.

It's the same story with the outhaul capstan drive shaft. It's made too
tight. If you rub it down till it slides in easily, you will not end up
breaking your gearbox trying to remove it. The same again for my
bowthruster tube to drive motor housing. It used to be a devil to
separate. Having opened up the motor recess slightly with a Dremel and
an abrasive wheel, it is no longer a problem. Whilst I have every
confidence in Amel's sub contractors following Amel's design exactly,
the fact is in the corrosive real world we operate in, the tolerances
need to be made greater if we are to avoid going through nightmare
maintenance issues such as these.

Finally, I should point out that unbelievably when you buy a Vetus
coupling from Vetus, the bolts that hold the dammed thing together are
NOT included! You will need to order a SET64 kit separately if you have
a 4" gearbox flange. A SET65 if you have a 5" one. Amel, being a good
company DO include these bolts when you buy from them, but it may be
worthwhile reminding them at order time to make sure they include them
in the box.

To anyone contemplating removing their Vetus coupling from the C-Drive,
be prepared for a difficult time.

Regards and good luck.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 Crusader Leros Greece



Re: Galley Refrigerator Malfunction

carcodespam@...
 

Hard to say which is the reason of this failure.
- Has the AC technician checked the system for leakages?
- Does he refill also some oil to the system together with the refrigerant?
- Does he used a vacuum pump before refilling the system?

Gerhard
Sharki #60
Kalamata, Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Galley Refrigerator Malfunction

 

Jose,

Frigoboat refrigerators installed on most Amels have a power control module E51600. This module will cutoff any compressor attempt if it senses low voltage during the compressor startup. You can test for this by turning ON a battery charger during startup. Some Frigoboat refrigerators installed on Amels have a low refrigerant sensor which cuts off the compressor when refrigerant is low.

Your refrigerator is 20+ years old. It is impossible to buy a new refrigerator which will routinely last 20 years. You might want to get a refrigeration mechanic who not only knows how to add refrigerant, but also knows how to find the leak. BTW, the filling needle valves probably went unused until your last service and are also 20 years old...they are a prime suspect for leaking, especially after being used after being untouched for 20 years.

I hope the above helps you make a decision.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Fri, Sep 28, 2018 at 11:17 AM jvenegas@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I had an AC technician refill the gas on my Galley refrigerator one month ago because it was not cooling enough. After the refill, the freezer cooled well and the refrigerator worked perfectly for two weeks.  Now it is no longer working at all but for an apparently different cause:  the compressor and fan try to start for 1 second and then stop.  I don't think it is leaking the refrigerant because that would just keep the motor going without lowering the temp.

If it is time to replace the compressor, has anybody done that?  I don't want to replace the refrigerator for esthetic and quality reasons.  


Any suggestions?


Jose


SM2K  278

Cold but Still sailing in Boston

Hoping to head south soon.


Galley Refrigerator Malfunction

Jose Venegas
 

I had an AC technician refill the gas on my Galley refrigerator one month ago because it was not cooling enough. After the refill, the freezer cooled well and the refrigerator worked perfectly for two weeks.  Now it is no longer working at all but for an apparently different cause:  the compressor and fan try to start for 1 second and then stop.  I don't think it is leaking the refrigerant because that would just keep the motor going without lowering the temp.

If it is time to replace the compressor, has anybody done that?  I don't want to replace the refrigerator for esthetic and quality reasons.  


Any suggestions?


Jose


SM2K  278

Cold but Still sailing in Boston

Hoping to head south soon.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

James Cromie
 

Same thing happened to me!


On Sep 28, 2018, at 9:20 AM, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Bill,

 

Yes! The secret switch.

 

Funny side note: I first read about this switch on the forum. It was very timely. A few weeks later, I was doing some work in the area of the secret switch and must have bumped it. The next time I went to start the engine, guess what? Thanks to this forum I knew what I had done.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2018 8:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

 

 

Mark,

 

And the "secret switch."


Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www..amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

 

On Thu, Sep 27, 2018, 18:48 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kent,

 

It is going to be a problem in one of two areas. The starter or the panel (fuse or key switch). This is assuming you have already checked the engine start battery? If you haven’t checked the battery, jump if from one of the house batteries. Unless you have a good load tester, the battery may be bad but still test okay. Easiest way to find out is to jump it.

 

Buy a heavy duty one of these (any good auto parts store will have one): https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool-W80586-Remote-Starter/dp/B00OPVYHZ4/ref=pd_sbs_469_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00OPVYHZ4&pd_rd_r=08c6ff7b-c2ad-11e8-a3f5-a953cb310f5f&pd_rd_w=hNR7v&pd_rd_wg=tTgxs&pf_rd_i=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=0bb14103-7f67-4c21-9b0b-31f42dc047e7&pf_rd_r=HB14K7VGEC8X04D5100P&pf_rd_s=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_t=40701&psc=1&refRID=HB14K7VGEC8X04D5100P

 

Connect this to the starter. Be VERY careful to connect it to the correct terminals (Not the +\-) It connects to the Pos and the S (small) terminal on the starter. Turn the ignition on. Push the button. If the engine starts the problem is in the panel. If the engine doesn’t start, it is the starter. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP6PbKhEzjU . this little switch basically bypasses the panel and allows you to isolate the problem.

 

Some people will make the connecting across the starters Pos and S terminals with a screw driver to start the engine. I think this is dangerous and would never recommend it unless it was a last resort. And, you will ruin a perfectly good screwdriver in the process.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2018 5:03 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

 

 

Hi all. My Yanmar 4JH4HTE 110 HP has been flawless for 5 years except for a starter that had to be replaced last year. When I had to move Kristy from a slip at the boat yard to the travel lift, she wouldn’t start.

There is no power getting to the starter. I hear the floating ground solenoid click when I push the stop button and turn the key to the glow plug position, but not when I turn the key to “Start”. I am getting power at the 12v hubs on the forward bulkhead of the engine room.

I’m thinking it’s probably the key switch on the Yanmar panel, but wondered if a bad diode in the floating ground setup could keep it from starting, too. Any other ideas?
I doubt the mechanic here will have a clue about how the floating ground works.

Also, my engine hour meter seems to be counting hours, but the display only comes on intermittently. I’m guessing there’s a loose wire but haven’t found it yet. Could this be connected somehow?

Thanks for any suggestions.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy
StMichaels/Yacht Maintenance, Cambridge, MD
Kristy


Re: Mechanics in Leros, Greece

Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117
 

No worries, Ian.
I'm thinking of renting a scooter tomorrow and would love to pop by. Hopefully the rain will cooperate. What's a good time? You can PM me at steve@....
-Bode


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

Mark Erdos
 

Hi Bill,

 

Yes! The secret switch.

 

Funny side note: I first read about this switch on the forum. It was very timely. A few weeks later, I was doing some work in the area of the secret switch and must have bumped it. The next time I went to start the engine, guess what? Thanks to this forum I knew what I had done.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2018 8:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

 

 

Mark,

 

And the "secret switch."


Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www..amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

 

On Thu, Sep 27, 2018, 18:48 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kent,

 

It is going to be a problem in one of two areas. The starter or the panel (fuse or key switch). This is assuming you have already checked the engine start battery? If you haven’t checked the battery, jump if from one of the house batteries. Unless you have a good load tester, the battery may be bad but still test okay. Easiest way to find out is to jump it.

 

Buy a heavy duty one of these (any good auto parts store will have one): https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool-W80586-Remote-Starter/dp/B00OPVYHZ4/ref=pd_sbs_469_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00OPVYHZ4&pd_rd_r=08c6ff7b-c2ad-11e8-a3f5-a953cb310f5f&pd_rd_w=hNR7v&pd_rd_wg=tTgxs&pf_rd_i=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=0bb14103-7f67-4c21-9b0b-31f42dc047e7&pf_rd_r=HB14K7VGEC8X04D5100P&pf_rd_s=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_t=40701&psc=1&refRID=HB14K7VGEC8X04D5100P

 

Connect this to the starter. Be VERY careful to connect it to the correct terminals (Not the +\-) It connects to the Pos and the S (small) terminal on the starter. Turn the ignition on. Push the button. If the engine starts the problem is in the panel. If the engine doesn’t start, it is the starter. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP6PbKhEzjU . this little switch basically bypasses the panel and allows you to isolate the problem.

 

Some people will make the connecting across the starters Pos and S terminals with a screw driver to start the engine. I think this is dangerous and would never recommend it unless it was a last resort. And, you will ruin a perfectly good screwdriver in the process.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2018 5:03 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

 

 

Hi all. My Yanmar 4JH4HTE 110 HP has been flawless for 5 years except for a starter that had to be replaced last year. When I had to move Kristy from a slip at the boat yard to the travel lift, she wouldn’t start.

There is no power getting to the starter. I hear the floating ground solenoid click when I push the stop button and turn the key to the glow plug position, but not when I turn the key to “Start”. I am getting power at the 12v hubs on the forward bulkhead of the engine room.

I’m thinking it’s probably the key switch on the Yanmar panel, but wondered if a bad diode in the floating ground setup could keep it from starting, too. Any other ideas?
I doubt the mechanic here will have a clue about how the floating ground works.

Also, my engine hour meter seems to be counting hours, but the display only comes on intermittently. I’m guessing there’s a loose wire but haven’t found it yet. Could this be connected somehow?

Thanks for any suggestions.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy
StMichaels/Yacht Maintenance, Cambridge, MD
Kristy


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

Mark Erdos
 

Eric,

 

Cream Puff was repowered by the previous owner so my set up maybe a little different. But, if the ignition is in the ON position shouldn’t this put 12v of power to the starter motor?

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2018 11:23 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

 

 

Mark,

That would normally work on most engines . However with an isolated ground you will also need to electrify the Valeo solenoid to ground the block.

 

There is  post marked AC on the ignition switch that that electrifies the panel and gauges.

There is  3 wire harness that starts the engine. One wire of red on the switch and the harness is also on the start post of the starter switch. The red wire on that harness closes the Valeo solenoid which grounds the block. Next to the Valeo solenoid,is another solenoid,If i remember correctly, the third wire  in the harness then closes this solenoid and send power to the Starter solenoid on the starter motor and then turns on the starter motor. The white wire in that harness does nothing . it is intended for an optional air heater which I do not have on Kimbelite.

 

I am rather familiar with the Yanmar wiring as I rewired my entire engine. As a side note the Motorola diodes that Amel uses are very heavy duty and I doubt that They are defective.

 

It was suggested that you jump the starting battery. This is what I would do first. Many times the battery tests good but there is oxidization on the lead post of the battery and the bottom of the crimp battery cable connector. Just clean these until they are bright if jumping the battery solves your problem.

Eric,

Sm 376


On Thu, Sep 27, 2018 at 07:48 PM, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Kent,

 

It is going to be a problem in one of two areas. The starter or the panel (fuse or key switch). This is assuming you have already checked the engine start battery? If you haven’t checked the battery, jump if from one of the house batteries. Unless you have a good load tester, the battery may be bad but still test okay. Easiest way to find out is to jump it.

 

Buy a heavy duty one of these (any good auto parts store will have one): https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool-W80586-Remote-Starter/dp/B00OPVYHZ4/ref=pd_sbs_469_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00OPVYHZ4&pd_rd_r=08c6ff7b-c2ad-11e8-a3f5-a953cb310f5f&pd_rd_w=hNR7v&pd_rd_wg=tTgxs&pf_rd_i=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=0bb14103-7f67-4c21-9b0b-31f42dc047e7&pf_rd_r=HB14K7VGEC8X04D5100P&pf_rd_s=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_t=40701&psc=1&refRID=HB14K7VGEC8X04D5100P

 

Connect this to the starter. Be VERY careful to connect it to the correct terminals (Not the +\-) It connects to the Pos and the S (small) terminal on the starter. Turn the ignition on. Push the button. If the engine starts the problem is in the panel. If the engine doesn’t start, it is the starter. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP6PbKhEzjU . this little switch basically bypasses the panel and allows you to isolate the problem.

 

Some people will make the connecting across the starters Pos and S terminals with a screw driver to start the engine. I think this is dangerous and would never recommend it unless it was a last resort. And, you will ruin a perfectly good screwdriver in the process.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2018 5:03 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

 

 

Hi all. My Yanmar 4JH4HTE 110 HP has been flawless for 5 years except for a starter that had to be replaced last year. When I had to move Kristy from a slip at the boat yard to the travel lift, she wouldn’t start.

There is no power getting to the starter. I hear the floating ground solenoid click when I push the stop button and turn the key to the glow plug position, but not when I turn the key to “Start”. I am getting power at the 12v hubs on the forward bulkhead of the engine room.

I’m thinking it’s probably the key switch on the Yanmar panel, but wondered if a bad diode in the floating ground setup could keep it from starting, too. Any other ideas?
I doubt the mechanic here will have a clue about how the floating ground works.

Also, my engine hour meter seems to be counting hours, but the display only comes on intermittently. I’m guessing there’s a loose wire but haven’t found it yet. Could this be connected somehow?

Thanks for any suggestions.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy
StMichaels/Yacht Maintenance, Cambridge, MD
Kristy


Re: Unexplained Explosion On Board

carcodespam@...
 

"We had the problem with polarity here in Greece in Thessaloniki, in Lesbos and after one day here in Leros.

Obviously every Marina here in Greece has a different polarity !


Hajo
SM 150 Serafine
Leros Greece"

Any Marina I know in Greece has 220 volts AC (alternate current) and not DC (direct current). So if you have a correct AC shore connection system at your boat the polarity does not matter. Perhaps you check if you have an isolating transformer on the boat or at least a piece called Zinc Safer in your shore connection.

Gerhard
Sharki #82
Kalamata


[Amel Yacht Owners] Negative leak to bonding system from 24v Alternator

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hello fellow Amel owners as promised:

The findings regarding the Leak from the alternator as described in the July 1 email.

I have been in touch with the service centre in the UK and they have advised me that they do not believe the alternator is worth salvaging as:

1. The regulator is defective but also was leaking from negative to the case, i.e. the bonding system. Replacement required and the new one available does not fit with out adaptation.
2. The commutator is badly worn and by the time it is re machined there would not be a lot of meat on it.
3. The negative terminal was leaking to the frame due to a slight bend on the negative terminal bolt which is only 6mm, this crushed the insulator and there was a build up of carbon dust that helped connect the bolt to the frame.


The diodes were absolutely fine.

They did not charge for this diagnosis. I am pleased with the new alternator and the ADVERC charge controller, and am very pleased I did not try and bodge repair the old one in the Azores.

I am happy to recommend this outfit. (Techsales@adverc.co.uk) contact Andy for sales and Mark for technical.

Kind regards

Nick
S/Y Amelia (Amel 54 hull 019)

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Nick ngtnewington@aol.com [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Negative leak to bonding system
Date: 1 July 2018 12:31:22 WEST
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Reply-To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com

I am now back on my boat in the Azores and have installed the new 175A alternator.

The leak test yields no leak, remember there was a negative leak to the bonding system.
The excitation circuit is as before but I have added a smart regulator.
The alternator kicks in straight away. Do not have to rev up to 1500 for it to kick in!

So great result!

What is the conclusion?

For sure somewhere within the old alternator there is a leak from negative terminal to the frame, tested it with multimeter.
We will not know until the alternator has been serviced exactlywhat is the problem. I will report my findings in due course.
On my next visit to the UK I will send it to the Leece-Neville distributor for service.

I also dived under the boat to check the anodes, and sure enough the prop anode has lost say 25%. So well done anode!

I believe it prudent to always fix a prop anode in all but wooden boats for just this situation.

Nick
Amelia (Amel 54 #19)

Sent from my iPhone

On 30 Jun 2018, at 08:53, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@transpacific.us <mailto:mshirloo@transpacific.us> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:



Reudi;

There are many aspects that affect the life of a diesel engine. If properly maintained and regularly run under proper load it is not unusual for a diesel engine to run in the 15,000 to 20,000 hours. We cruise for about half the year currently and we only put about 200 hours per year. So the lifetime of a diesel engine could last well beyond the average cruising life time.

Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0908 Fax


From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>]
Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2018 12:33 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bow-Truster overheat



Hello Olivier and Forum

Thanks a lot for your advice and it perfectly make sense what you say. I was not thinking of this Voltage aspects!
BTW,
Do you have an ideas what is the average lifetime of such an ONAN GenSet in hours and years?

Fair winds and take care.
Best regards
Ruedi
SY WASABI A54#55

Von: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> on behalf of "Beaute Olivier atlanticyachtsurvey@yahoo.com <mailto:atlanticyachtsurvey@yahoo.com> [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>>
Antworten an: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>>
Datum: Freitag, 29. Juni 2018 um 20:20
An: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups...com>>
Betreff: Re: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bow-Truster overheat



Hello all AMEL 54 owners,

there is indeed a thermic switch on the bow-thruster motor. It is connected to one of the carbon brushes. If you have already had it stop the motor, several times, or you purchased a used boat and you don't know about the over-use of the bow-thruster by the former owner, it may be time to check the carbon brushes of this motor.
Indeed, worn out brushes lead to warming up where the brushes make contact with the rotor. And worn out brushes make the motor less powerful, then you may use it a longer time for the same amount of thrust.
If you see a lot of carbon dust around your BT motor, it's time to check/replace them.

Moreover, when AMEL says that you should turn ON the generator when using the bow-thruster (and the 100A battery charger), this is because the bow-thruster will work with higher voltage (the voltage drop will be less if the charger is ON, and as the main engine alternator is not charging much at low revs). With higher voltage, the amperage will be less, the warming up of the thermic switch too and the wear of the carbon brushes too.

Now, I agree that you don't absolutely need to turn on the generator and battery charger in any conditions. But do it if you enter a harbor that you don't know (you may use the BT a lot) or if the wind is strong.

In the french Navy, when a vessel enters a harbor, every means of power is systematically turned ON, in case one fails. Bill R will tell us how they do in the US Navy, but it may be the same.
This was the idea of Captain AMEL and Mr. Carteau when they decided to give the "Generator ON when docking" advice.

Rüdi, don't worry about too much wear on your generator, it is a very resistant piece of hardware....


Keep enjoying easy dockings!!

Olivier

On Friday, June 29, 2018, 5:42:37 PM GMT+2, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@transpacific.us <mailto:mshirloo@transpacific.us> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:




Reudi;

The main reason to run the Genset while using the bow thruster is not to reduce the load on the batteries. Putting out 400-500A for short bursts will not have a significant negative effect on the batteries.

By running the Genset you are maintaining a higher voltage to the bow thruster, reducing the current requirement and thus reducing the heat generated in the bow thruster and all associated wiring supplying the bow thruster. This will maximize the time the bow thruster will function before the thermal cutoff kicks in. Therefore for us it is not a calculation of battery vs. generator life, but an issue of safety. A few extra seconds of bow thruster availability may make a big difference in the result of the maneuver.

Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0908 Fax


From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>]
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2018 8:32 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bow-Truster overheat



Thanks for all your thoughtful responses. This is a great forum and I have learned a lot within a short time about AMEL. I love it!

Here some comments on your responses:

I’m not using the bow truster more than 5-6 seconds per burst. When I use it, I’m carefully not to overdue and I usualy waiting to cool down a bit between 2 burst. Thats why I was wondering how fast it was paused by the system….

No, I don’t use generator while use the bow truster, as AMEL and many others recommending. I agree with Thomas about it.
- In one hand the Engine is running always when use the BT and is supporting the batteries as well .
- On the other hand I do not extensively use the BT so my Batteries should be able to carry the load.

- AND most important; I don’t want to shorten the live of my GenSet just to help the batteries a bit.
In my opinion is; The live of a Diesel engine is shorten by too many short usage without much load and without running it at leased 30min at a time. When I turn the GenSet on, I use it for many things at the time, Laundry, Water-maker, heater, charging, whatsoever. Therefore it runs at leased an hour when it’s on.

BTW:
We don’t had the 425A fuse on #55 either. Olivier recommended to install it and also an emergency shutoff in the BT compartment . So we did. ;-)

Fair winds!
Ruedi
WASABI A54/55
Kithnos

Von: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> on behalf of "'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@gmail.com <mailto:svgarulfo@gmail...com> [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups...com>>
Antworten an: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>>
Datum: Donnerstag, 28. Juni 2018 um 13:33
An: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>>
Betreff: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bow-Truster overheat



Hi Mohammad and Aty,

So you don't have that 425A fuse on Kokomo?
It'd be interesting to have other data points.

When we started seeing A54s for sale, someone from the yard in Hyères told us Amel started to fit the emergency disconnect on 54s after instances of incidents where the bow thruster wouldn't stop. The thermal switch should provide that safety stop, but maybe they felt there should be a manual override too, in case.

By the way, it was in the same sentence as "have the genset running when you use the bow thruster" that raised a few eyebrows in this group a while back. At the time, not knowing better, I took it for granted. Sufficient and safe, yes. Necessary?, I'm not sure. We don't do it anymore as we don't go to marinas that much and when we do, we try to play the game of least-bow-thruster-usage to improve our handling skills, and our batteries can handle the high current discharge.


Fair winds!

Thomas
GARULFO
A54-122
Curacao



On Thu, 28 Jun 2018 at 05:38, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@transpacific.us <mailto:mshirloo@transpacific.us> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:


Hi Thomas;

Your fuse may have been added on because I've heard some surveyors and insurance companies regard this situation as unsafe and will require the fuse to be added. I'm pretty sure that we were told by Olivier during our survey that the bow thruster is directly connected to the batteries. When I inquired about the reason, I believe the response was that Amel felt that the safety of the boat, when absolutely needing the bow thruster to be operational, was more important than the possibility of the bow thruster being damaged due to overuse.

The emergency disconnect is a manually operated switch which would require intervention form a person to stop current flowing to the bow thruster.

Respectfully;
Mohammad and Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54 #099


From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>]
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 2:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bow-Truster overheat






Hi Mohammad,

On Garulfo (54-122) there is also a 425A fuse on the positive cable and an emergency disconnect (big red button), both housed in the box inside the forward locker.

I recently found the emergency disconnect to be rusted frozen so it's on the list for replacement.

I would encourage others to test the emergency disconnect as it has a carbon steel backing plate and is mounted without any kind of waterproofing so is bound to rust.

Fair winds,

Thomas
GARULFO
A54-122
Curacao


On Wed, 27 Jun 2018 at 19:27, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@transpacific.us <mailto:mshirloo@transpacific.us> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:


Hello Reudi;

Yes, the Amel 54 has a thermal cutoff to prevent damage to the thruster as well as continuous high current draw (Around 550 Amps at 24V) which could lead to fire on board. We've had the thermal cutoff kick in only a couple of times and it has reset in a matter of minutes. We have not timed the exact reset duration.

I'm not aware of any adjustments in the thermal cutoff. The bow thruster has a direct connection to the batteries without a breaker. The thermal cutoff is the only safety items preventing major damage to the thruster and/or wiring.

Try to use the thruster in bursts (less than 15 seconds), as much as possible, so it has time to cool down between usage. We try to over correct a bit when we use use the BT so as the bow falls off, the BT has more time to cool.

Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0908 Fax


From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>]
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 9:58 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>



Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bow-Truster overheat





Dear Forum





On my Amel-54 I discovered that the bow truster stops working after repeatingly use within 10-15 min timeframe.

I used the bow truster a bit more than usual when I practiced some manouvers first time; - and on a second occation when I had to manouver in a marina with a lot of windguests of 18+ kn and another chain over my Anker...

It stopped working and after a while (maybe 10 min.) it re-started & operated normaly. I know BT Is not made for constant use, - only few seconds at a time. Then wait and re-use another time.

Question from a beginner:

Does the bow truster has a termic fuse which is activated after some time of usage to save the motor from overheating?

Does anyone know exactly how it works and if this can be adjusted because I think the BT on Wasabi switches of quite fast. Any ideas or other information?

Best regards

Ruedi

SY Wasabi A54#55

Sailing Cyclades GR.




















Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Unexplained Explosion On Board

Hajo Hille
 

We had the problem with polarity here in Greece in Thessaloniki, in Lesbos and after one day here in Leros.

Obviously every Marina here in Greece has a different polarity !


Hajo
SM 150 Serafine
Leros Greece



Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 26.09.2018 um 17:17 schrieb greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Ian,


Are the breakers on your 220V panel double pole breakers?  or single pole?

Is it possible that the shore power polarity was reversed? 

Did anyone else on the dock have a problem?

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Yanmar starting problem

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Goit Deck Hatch Lens Reseal

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Vetus Coupling Failure

eric freedman
 

16881 - 16900 of 59233