Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

Patrick McAneny
 

I agree ,it looks to be a SM of an older vintage pre 2000s . Very sad.
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Mon, Aug 27, 2018 7:05 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

 

Sad story....

The pictures are not of a 54 though, it seems to be a SuperMaramu to me. 

Thomas
GARULFO
A54-122
Curaçao 



On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 at 17:45, Nick ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Shipwrecked in shelter

The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz
Brenda Webb
The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz
With huge sighs of relief we dropped anchor in Suwarrow, the remote Pacific atoll in the northern Cook Islands that was once an idyllic home for Kiwi recluse Tom Neale.
My husband David Morgan had read Neale's book, An Island to Oneself, many years ago, delighting in his colourful story of solitary life on Suwarrow in the 1950s, '60s and '70s. It inspired us to take the northern route from French Polynesia to Tonga via this dot on the chart, rather than the southern route through Rarotonga.
After a particularly scruffy five-day passage from the French Polynesia Island of Maupiti, near Bora Bora, we just wanted to drop the hook and sleep. It wasn't to be. At midnight, a gale tore through the anchorage.
Unloading the stricken vessel.
Brenda Webb
Unloading the stricken vessel.
We had left French Polynesia in late July on our Moody 46 Bandit, in 15-20 knot winds. We had some good sailing but, as usual in the tropics, the squalls kept us on our toes. We arrived off Suwarrow in drizzle and overcast skies, and gingerly picked our way through the pass, relieved that our charts were accurate and that the reefs and shoal ground were easy to see from my spot on the bow. In this part of the world, eyeball navigation is essential.
The lagoon was littered with coral heads so it was difficult to find a good place to anchor; we took our time and eventually found a reasonable patch of sand. As usual, we snorkelled down to ensure the anchor was well set and as free from coral as possible. Inquisitive black tipped reef sharks kept an eye on us, and we kept an eye on them as we swam through the tepid turquoise waters. Afterwards we washed five days of accumulated salt water off Bandit, put our wet weather gear out to dry and enjoyed a traditional landfall rum. We soaked up the beauty of this gorgeous setting before sinking into bed.
The gale arrived at midnight, wrenching us from sleep. We raced on deck to find chaos: boats straining at anchor and swinging unpredictably as chains snagged on coral. Our first concern was that we might drag, so David started the engine on and maintained the revs while I grabbed the torch to take a visual on the other boats nearby but it was difficult in driving rain and with no moon.
All sailors know that feeling when you are at the mercy of the elements. We trust our anchor - a 25kg stainless steel Delta - and we had 40m of chain out in 7m depth but I kept wondering whether we would hold. Worse, with such poor visibility, would we know if we were dragging? Given the appalling conditions, we turned on the chart plotter to mark our position and set a drag alarm.
The VHF crackled into life as the boat beside us called to say he felt we were getting too close. His chain had snagged on coral, reducing his swinging room, and he was concerned we would crash into him when we swung. That seemed the least of our worries and nothing a few fenders over the side wouldn't deal with.
In a coral-strewn anchorage, there is always a chance of snagging the chain; sometimes windlasses can be torn from decks. I could see concern on David's face. As the wind increased to 35 knots, I became absolutely terrified.
The last time we'd had strong wind at anchor was on the East Coast of the United States when 53 knots slammed into us without warning, sending us dragging sideways in an anchorage with a soft muddy bottom. We had deployed our second anchor, a Fortress, in record time, and it saved our bacon. Stupidly, this time, because we'd been on passage, the 100m warp was stowed in the aft locker. Due to our tiredness, we had left it there. Bad move.
Then I heard the distinctive graunch of chain on coral, and I screamed over the wind to David. I took the helm while he went to investigate and discovered our thick snubber line; ie, shock absorber, had snapped. He retied it to the chain using a rolling hitch; the stainless steel hook we normally used had dropped from the chain to the sea bed. With the next gust Bandit somehow freed herself from the coral and the graunch sound stopped. Relief washed over us.
At 1am our Australian friends anchored behind us, were alerted by their neighbours that they appeared to be dragging. Steve, the skipper, came on VHF and said he would try to re-anchor. Twenty minutes later he said their anchor chain had broken and all he could do was motor until first light.
As the wind continued to gust, he battled to control Amiable, his Amel 54, and gave us all some anxious moments as he narrowly avoided colliding with other boats, including us. He was obviously struggling to see and, over the VHF, he asked boats to turn on their running lights as he could barely see anchor lights at the mastheads.
David wanted to call on VHF and suggest he go stern-to the wind - a technique he'd learned years ago. When the boat's stern is into wind, it acts like a weather vane and, with revs on, you can sit there for ages. Steve appeared to be doing the opposite - trying to keep his bow into wind - but it kept blowing off. We discussed it, but figured the less chat on VHF the better and we were already busy monitoring our own situation.
We watched with growing concern as Steve's yacht appeared to be blown further away in the gusts and then, with despair, heard Steve come on VHF to say he was on a reef.
The next few hours were a nightmare. A calm, gently spoken American cruiser took control as we mounted a VHF vigil. The American talked Steve and Liz through their options logically, telling them not to abandon ship which was their gut instinct. "Put all your valuables into dry bags in the cockpit and wait for first light." All good advice but it was only 3am. Dawn was hours away.
Steve gave his GPS position which we plotted on the chart. He was against a shallow reef and in no immediate danger of sinking or drifting into deep water. It was impossible to mount any rescue attempt in the atrocious conditions; the wind was screaming and pushing up a choppy swell.
The darkness seemed all-enveloping. The tension in the anchorage was palpable.. Every time I looked out at the yacht on the reef, lit up with deck lights, the waves were crashing more intensely over her bow. What if she was pushed off the reef into deep water - how would we rescue them? What if she broke up?
"That could be us," I kept thinking. Bandit is our home and full of treasures collected over our eight years of cruising in the Mediterranean, Caribbean, Central America, East Coast of the US and the Pacific. It would be unbearable to lose her.
More bad news came. Panicked, Steve came on VHF: they were taking on water through the rudder post, and the bilge pumps were not keeping up. He was told to stuff towels, pillows, bedding and anything else in the hole; keep all the pumps running and start bailing.
Soon Steve reported holes appearing in the hull. The aft cabin and saloon were filling with water. "I really think we need to get off," he said.
The amazingly cool American disagreed. "The water level inside the boat will not rise higher than the water level outside and you still have plenty of freeboard." Incredibly sensible advice; why hadn't we figured that out?
At first light, Suwarrow station ranger Harry Papai was roused and set off in his aluminium boat to rescue a much shaken couple. David went ashore to see what he could do. The priority was retrieving possessions so he donned a wetsuit and reef shoes and headed out to help..
Steve and Liz were still visibly shaken when they came aboard Bandit later that day to send emails to family and their insurance company, drink copious amounts of tea and relate what had been the most terrifying ordeal of their lives. They had been trying to head out of the anchorage into deeper water when a 40 knot gust blew them onto the reef, Steve said. The experience left Liz so traumatised she left on the first cruising yacht heading to American Samoa for a flight to Australia.
Over the next few days as conditions abated, we helped Steve salvage a mountain of gear. Batteries, diesel, sails, ropes, food, all interior fittings including oven and washing machine, clothes and electrics were removed and taken ashore. David even dismounted winches; diesel was pumped from the main tanks. The big fear was polluting this beautiful lagoon. It was a mammoth task and the cruising community rallied to help.
Eventually we felt we'd done all we could and, wanting to leave Suwarrow with good memories we took time out to go snorkelling with manta rays and explore the wonderful coral reefs around the anchorage. As if on cue two humpback whales swam into the anchorage and right around the boats - we sat and watched with awe. The weather was clear and sunny, and as we looked across the flat calm anchorage it seemed unbelievable such drama had unfolded here in this piece of Pacific paradise..
Sadly this wasn't the first boat to come to grief here. Caretaker Harry said he knew of eight boats resting in the lagoon. And until the authorities put down moorings, no doubt more will meet a sticky end.



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

Sv Garulfo
 


Sad story...

The pictures are not of a 54 though, it seems to be a SuperMaramu to me. 

Thomas
GARULFO
A54-122
Curaçao 



On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 at 17:45, Nick ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Shipwrecked in shelter

The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz

Brenda Webb

The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz

With huge sighs of relief we dropped anchor in Suwarrow, the remote Pacific atoll in the northern Cook Islands that was once an idyllic home for Kiwi recluse Tom Neale.

My husband David Morgan had read Neale's book, An Island to Oneself, many years ago, delighting in his colourful story of solitary life on Suwarrow in the 1950s, '60s and '70s. It inspired us to take the northern route from French Polynesia to Tonga via this dot on the chart, rather than the southern route through Rarotonga.

After a particularly scruffy five-day passage from the French Polynesia Island of Maupiti, near Bora Bora, we just wanted to drop the hook and sleep. It wasn't to be. At midnight, a gale tore through the anchorage.

Unloading the stricken vessel.

Brenda Webb

Unloading the stricken vessel.

We had left French Polynesia in late July on our Moody 46 Bandit, in 15-20 knot winds. We had some good sailing but, as usual in the tropics, the squalls kept us on our toes. We arrived off Suwarrow in drizzle and overcast skies, and gingerly picked our way through the pass, relieved that our charts were accurate and that the reefs and shoal ground were easy to see from my spot on the bow. In this part of the world, eyeball navigation is essential.

The lagoon was littered with coral heads so it was difficult to find a good place to anchor; we took our time and eventually found a reasonable patch of sand. As usual, we snorkelled down to ensure the anchor was well set and as free from coral as possible. Inquisitive black tipped reef sharks kept an eye on us, and we kept an eye on them as we swam through the tepid turquoise waters. Afterwards we washed five days of accumulated salt water off Bandit, put our wet weather gear out to dry and enjoyed a traditional landfall rum. We soaked up the beauty of this gorgeous setting before sinking into bed.

The gale arrived at midnight, wrenching us from sleep. We raced on deck to find chaos: boats straining at anchor and swinging unpredictably as chains snagged on coral. Our first concern was that we might drag, so David started the engine on and maintained the revs while I grabbed the torch to take a visual on the other boats nearby but it was difficult in driving rain and with no moon.

All sailors know that feeling when you are at the mercy of the elements. We trust our anchor - a 25kg stainless steel Delta - and we had 40m of chain out in 7m depth but I kept wondering whether we would hold. Worse, with such poor visibility, would we know if we were dragging? Given the appalling conditions, we turned on the chart plotter to mark our position and set a drag alarm.

The VHF crackled into life as the boat beside us called to say he felt we were getting too close. His chain had snagged on coral, reducing his swinging room, and he was concerned we would crash into him when we swung. That seemed the least of our worries and nothing a few fenders over the side wouldn't deal with.

In a coral-strewn anchorage, there is always a chance of snagging the chain; sometimes windlasses can be torn from decks. I could see concern on David's face. As the wind increased to 35 knots, I became absolutely terrified.

The last time we'd had strong wind at anchor was on the East Coast of the United States when 53 knots slammed into us without warning, sending us dragging sideways in an anchorage with a soft muddy bottom. We had deployed our second anchor, a Fortress, in record time, and it saved our bacon. Stupidly, this time, because we'd been on passage, the 100m warp was stowed in the aft locker. Due to our tiredness, we had left it there. Bad move.

Then I heard the distinctive graunch of chain on coral, and I screamed over the wind to David. I took the helm while he went to investigate and discovered our thick snubber line; ie, shock absorber, had snapped. He retied it to the chain using a rolling hitch; the stainless steel hook we normally used had dropped from the chain to the sea bed. With the next gust Bandit somehow freed herself from the coral and the graunch sound stopped. Relief washed over us.

At 1am our Australian friends anchored behind us, were alerted by their neighbours that they appeared to be dragging. Steve, the skipper, came on VHF and said he would try to re-anchor. Twenty minutes later he said their anchor chain had broken and all he could do was motor until first light.

As the wind continued to gust, he battled to control Amiable, his Amel 54, and gave us all some anxious moments as he narrowly avoided colliding with other boats, including us. He was obviously struggling to see and, over the VHF, he asked boats to turn on their running lights as he could barely see anchor lights at the mastheads.

David wanted to call on VHF and suggest he go stern-to the wind - a technique he'd learned years ago. When the boat's stern is into wind, it acts like a weather vane and, with revs on, you can sit there for ages. Steve appeared to be doing the opposite - trying to keep his bow into wind - but it kept blowing off. We discussed it, but figured the less chat on VHF the better and we were already busy monitoring our own situation.

We watched with growing concern as Steve's yacht appeared to be blown further away in the gusts and then, with despair, heard Steve come on VHF to say he was on a reef.

The next few hours were a nightmare. A calm, gently spoken American cruiser took control as we mounted a VHF vigil. The American talked Steve and Liz through their options logically, telling them not to abandon ship which was their gut instinct. "Put all your valuables into dry bags in the cockpit and wait for first light." All good advice but it was only 3am. Dawn was hours away.

Steve gave his GPS position which we plotted on the chart. He was against a shallow reef and in no immediate danger of sinking or drifting into deep water. It was impossible to mount any rescue attempt in the atrocious conditions; the wind was screaming and pushing up a choppy swell.

The darkness seemed all-enveloping. The tension in the anchorage was palpable. Every time I looked out at the yacht on the reef, lit up with deck lights, the waves were crashing more intensely over her bow. What if she was pushed off the reef into deep water - how would we rescue them? What if she broke up?

"That could be us," I kept thinking. Bandit is our home and full of treasures collected over our eight years of cruising in the Mediterranean, Caribbean, Central America, East Coast of the US and the Pacific. It would be unbearable to lose her.

More bad news came. Panicked, Steve came on VHF: they were taking on water through the rudder post, and the bilge pumps were not keeping up. He was told to stuff towels, pillows, bedding and anything else in the hole; keep all the pumps running and start bailing.

Soon Steve reported holes appearing in the hull. The aft cabin and saloon were filling with water. "I really think we need to get off," he said.

The amazingly cool American disagreed. "The water level inside the boat will not rise higher than the water level outside and you still have plenty of freeboard." Incredibly sensible advice; why hadn't we figured that out?

At first light, Suwarrow station ranger Harry Papai was roused and set off in his aluminium boat to rescue a much shaken couple. David went ashore to see what he could do. The priority was retrieving possessions so he donned a wetsuit and reef shoes and headed out to help.

Steve and Liz were still visibly shaken when they came aboard Bandit later that day to send emails to family and their insurance company, drink copious amounts of tea and relate what had been the most terrifying ordeal of their lives. They had been trying to head out of the anchorage into deeper water when a 40 knot gust blew them onto the reef, Steve said. The experience left Liz so traumatised she left on the first cruising yacht heading to American Samoa for a flight to Australia.

Over the next few days as conditions abated, we helped Steve salvage a mountain of gear. Batteries, diesel, sails, ropes, food, all interior fittings including oven and washing machine, clothes and electrics were removed and taken ashore. David even dismounted winches; diesel was pumped from the main tanks. The big fear was polluting this beautiful lagoon. It was a mammoth task and the cruising community rallied to help.

Eventually we felt we'd done all we could and, wanting to leave Suwarrow with good memories we took time out to go snorkelling with manta rays and explore the wonderful coral reefs around the anchorage. As if on cue two humpback whales swam into the anchorage and right around the boats - we sat and watched with awe. The weather was clear and sunny, and as we looked across the flat calm anchorage it seemed unbelievable such drama had unfolded here in this piece of Pacific paradise.

Sadly this wasn't the first boat to come to grief here. Caretaker Harry said he knew of eight boats resting in the lagoon. And until the authorities put down moorings, no doubt more will meet a sticky end.




Suwarrow —

ngtnewington Newington
 

Here is another story from noon site but another Amel.
https://www.noonsite.com/Countries/CookIslands/Suwarrow


Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

ngtnewington Newington
 

Shipwrecked in shelter

The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz

Brenda Webb

The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz

With huge sighs of relief we dropped anchor in Suwarrow, the remote Pacific atoll in the northern Cook Islands that was once an idyllic home for Kiwi recluse Tom Neale.

My husband David Morgan had read Neale's book, An Island to Oneself, many years ago, delighting in his colourful story of solitary life on Suwarrow in the 1950s, '60s and '70s. It inspired us to take the northern route from French Polynesia to Tonga via this dot on the chart, rather than the southern route through Rarotonga.

After a particularly scruffy five-day passage from the French Polynesia Island of Maupiti, near Bora Bora, we just wanted to drop the hook and sleep. It wasn't to be. At midnight, a gale tore through the anchorage.

Unloading the stricken vessel.

Brenda Webb

Unloading the stricken vessel.

We had left French Polynesia in late July on our Moody 46 Bandit, in 15-20 knot winds. We had some good sailing but, as usual in the tropics, the squalls kept us on our toes. We arrived off Suwarrow in drizzle and overcast skies, and gingerly picked our way through the pass, relieved that our charts were accurate and that the reefs and shoal ground were easy to see from my spot on the bow. In this part of the world, eyeball navigation is essential.

The lagoon was littered with coral heads so it was difficult to find a good place to anchor; we took our time and eventually found a reasonable patch of sand. As usual, we snorkelled down to ensure the anchor was well set and as free from coral as possible. Inquisitive black tipped reef sharks kept an eye on us, and we kept an eye on them as we swam through the tepid turquoise waters. Afterwards we washed five days of accumulated salt water off Bandit, put our wet weather gear out to dry and enjoyed a traditional landfall rum. We soaked up the beauty of this gorgeous setting before sinking into bed.

The gale arrived at midnight, wrenching us from sleep. We raced on deck to find chaos: boats straining at anchor and swinging unpredictably as chains snagged on coral. Our first concern was that we might drag, so David started the engine on and maintained the revs while I grabbed the torch to take a visual on the other boats nearby but it was difficult in driving rain and with no moon.

All sailors know that feeling when you are at the mercy of the elements. We trust our anchor - a 25kg stainless steel Delta - and we had 40m of chain out in 7m depth but I kept wondering whether we would hold. Worse, with such poor visibility, would we know if we were dragging? Given the appalling conditions, we turned on the chart plotter to mark our position and set a drag alarm.

The VHF crackled into life as the boat beside us called to say he felt we were getting too close. His chain had snagged on coral, reducing his swinging room, and he was concerned we would crash into him when we swung. That seemed the least of our worries and nothing a few fenders over the side wouldn't deal with.

In a coral-strewn anchorage, there is always a chance of snagging the chain; sometimes windlasses can be torn from decks. I could see concern on David's face. As the wind increased to 35 knots, I became absolutely terrified.

The last time we'd had strong wind at anchor was on the East Coast of the United States when 53 knots slammed into us without warning, sending us dragging sideways in an anchorage with a soft muddy bottom. We had deployed our second anchor, a Fortress, in record time, and it saved our bacon. Stupidly, this time, because we'd been on passage, the 100m warp was stowed in the aft locker. Due to our tiredness, we had left it there. Bad move.

Then I heard the distinctive graunch of chain on coral, and I screamed over the wind to David. I took the helm while he went to investigate and discovered our thick snubber line; ie, shock absorber, had snapped. He retied it to the chain using a rolling hitch; the stainless steel hook we normally used had dropped from the chain to the sea bed. With the next gust Bandit somehow freed herself from the coral and the graunch sound stopped. Relief washed over us.

At 1am our Australian friends anchored behind us, were alerted by their neighbours that they appeared to be dragging. Steve, the skipper, came on VHF and said he would try to re-anchor. Twenty minutes later he said their anchor chain had broken and all he could do was motor until first light.

As the wind continued to gust, he battled to control Amiable, his Amel 54, and gave us all some anxious moments as he narrowly avoided colliding with other boats, including us. He was obviously struggling to see and, over the VHF, he asked boats to turn on their running lights as he could barely see anchor lights at the mastheads.

David wanted to call on VHF and suggest he go stern-to the wind - a technique he'd learned years ago. When the boat's stern is into wind, it acts like a weather vane and, with revs on, you can sit there for ages. Steve appeared to be doing the opposite - trying to keep his bow into wind - but it kept blowing off. We discussed it, but figured the less chat on VHF the better and we were already busy monitoring our own situation.

We watched with growing concern as Steve's yacht appeared to be blown further away in the gusts and then, with despair, heard Steve come on VHF to say he was on a reef.

The next few hours were a nightmare. A calm, gently spoken American cruiser took control as we mounted a VHF vigil. The American talked Steve and Liz through their options logically, telling them not to abandon ship which was their gut instinct. "Put all your valuables into dry bags in the cockpit and wait for first light." All good advice but it was only 3am. Dawn was hours away.

Steve gave his GPS position which we plotted on the chart. He was against a shallow reef and in no immediate danger of sinking or drifting into deep water. It was impossible to mount any rescue attempt in the atrocious conditions; the wind was screaming and pushing up a choppy swell.

The darkness seemed all-enveloping. The tension in the anchorage was palpable. Every time I looked out at the yacht on the reef, lit up with deck lights, the waves were crashing more intensely over her bow. What if she was pushed off the reef into deep water - how would we rescue them? What if she broke up?

"That could be us," I kept thinking. Bandit is our home and full of treasures collected over our eight years of cruising in the Mediterranean, Caribbean, Central America, East Coast of the US and the Pacific. It would be unbearable to lose her.

More bad news came. Panicked, Steve came on VHF: they were taking on water through the rudder post, and the bilge pumps were not keeping up. He was told to stuff towels, pillows, bedding and anything else in the hole; keep all the pumps running and start bailing.

Soon Steve reported holes appearing in the hull. The aft cabin and saloon were filling with water. "I really think we need to get off," he said.

The amazingly cool American disagreed. "The water level inside the boat will not rise higher than the water level outside and you still have plenty of freeboard." Incredibly sensible advice; why hadn't we figured that out?

At first light, Suwarrow station ranger Harry Papai was roused and set off in his aluminium boat to rescue a much shaken couple. David went ashore to see what he could do. The priority was retrieving possessions so he donned a wetsuit and reef shoes and headed out to help.

Steve and Liz were still visibly shaken when they came aboard Bandit later that day to send emails to family and their insurance company, drink copious amounts of tea and relate what had been the most terrifying ordeal of their lives. They had been trying to head out of the anchorage into deeper water when a 40 knot gust blew them onto the reef, Steve said. The experience left Liz so traumatised she left on the first cruising yacht heading to American Samoa for a flight to Australia.

Over the next few days as conditions abated, we helped Steve salvage a mountain of gear. Batteries, diesel, sails, ropes, food, all interior fittings including oven and washing machine, clothes and electrics were removed and taken ashore. David even dismounted winches; diesel was pumped from the main tanks. The big fear was polluting this beautiful lagoon. It was a mammoth task and the cruising community rallied to help.

Eventually we felt we'd done all we could and, wanting to leave Suwarrow with good memories we took time out to go snorkelling with manta rays and explore the wonderful coral reefs around the anchorage. As if on cue two humpback whales swam into the anchorage and right around the boats - we sat and watched with awe. The weather was clear and sunny, and as we looked across the flat calm anchorage it seemed unbelievable such drama had unfolded here in this piece of Pacific paradise.

Sadly this wasn't the first boat to come to grief here. Caretaker Harry said he knew of eight boats resting in the lagoon. And until the authorities put down moorings, no doubt more will meet a sticky end.




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Anchor chain

karkauai
 

Hi, Paul.
Your gypsy should have numbers that identify what size chain it takes.  It’s always a good idea to cut off several links and take them, or bring the gypsy to the chain store if you are buying on site.

This was discussed relatively recently and I think it was Bill Rouse who posted info on chain sizes.

Several years ago, I noticed my chain was getting a little rusty on the end that was being used.  Per others’ suggestions, I turned it end for end and used the rust free end for 2-3yrs.  Then when I thought it was time to have it regalvanized, the half that was not being used was dusted into a solid ball in the chain locker.  What a mess!  With such limited access, it took two of us three solid weekends to free it up.

Now, I flush fresh water down the hawsepipe when ever I have rainwater in the dinghy, and when I’m tied up to the dock.  My advice is DON’T turn your chain end-for-end. 
 I also spray Boeshield over the chain in the locker every few months, and run all the chain out periodically to inspect it.

If the rust is significant consider having it regalvanized.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM243

On Aug 27, 2018, at 1:00 PM, sharongbrown@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

Some questions about anchor chain:

1. How do Iknow what size it is? Do I measure the internal/external longways diameter of a link?
2. Should I be concerned about a bit of rust - is there a point at which I should know it needs replacing?
3. What is the best type of chain available in the WIndwards/Leewards to replace it with?

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Anchor chain

ngtnewington Newington
 

Breaking strain on Limousine G70 is 11+metric tons.

I have never broken chain myself but I know of an Amel 54 that was lost in Suvarov Atol due to her chain breaking in a squall and pounding on a reef. (Google it )

My point is simple; on my last boat, a Bowman 46 of 10 tons low windage I used G40 10mm chain. 
On my  boat before her, “Faith of Norfolk” I used 10mm chain. She was 35 ft on deck gaff rugged cutter. 
Now on Amelia; 54 ft and 18 to 20 tons and relatively high windage G40 10mm does not sit easy with me. 

I would be content to go for 12mm G40 but then it would be heavy and probably not fit in the locker.

I am sure that you could sail around the world and never break G40 but.......then you should go for 8mm G70 it would be stronger. 

No to my mind Amel specified G70 for the 54’s for a good reason. You really should not cut corners on your chain.

Nick
Amelia (Amel 54 #019)


On 27 Aug 2018, at 21:02, Mark Pitt mark_pitt@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I recently purchased the G70 chain from Chaineries Limosines, Amel’s provider.  Their catalog gives a rupture strength of 6400 kg for the G40 and 11200 kg for the G70.  That is a 75 percent higher value for the G70.


Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III, SM419
Lanzarote, Canary Islands 


On Aug 27, 2018, at 8:08 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

A small correction:  The difference in strength between galvanized G40 and G70 is not anywhere near a factor of 2, it  is actually more like 20%.  G70 chain is, however, roughly 2X as strong as G30 ("BBB"), so that might be where that number comes from.

According to the data I have, the specified breaking strength for G40 is 16,200 lbs, while for G70 it is 19,800.  Working Load Limits (WLL) is usually specified for these kinds of alloy chains as 1/3 the breaking strength.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Micron 66 Caribbean experience

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Get Micron 66 while you still can. After 6 years of using this paint we are battling to find it here in Asia or anywhere across the Indian Ocean, and need a re-paint soon. 

Seems most countries out this way are going to Micron Extra instead. From our experience Micron 66 is better than Micron 77 and Micron 33. Nice to hear it is still sold in the Caribbean where we are headed after South Africa. It has been great anti-foul paint for us.

Colin, SV Island Pearl II
SM #332 Mahajunga, Madagascar (waiting for weather window to head for South Africa - no Micron 66 sold there either)


On Sat, Aug 25, 2018 at 5:52 PM 'dancarlson367@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thanks for sharing the experiences.  I think that I will get a couple gallons, light sand and focus on the waterline, bow and rudder.  


My plans are to haul again next hurricane season and then apply a proper two coats at that time, with 3rd coat at waterline and leading edges.


Best regards, Dan & Lori Carlson on SM387, sv BeBe 




 


Dan & Lori,

We use a similar ablative paint, and put on two coats every haul out. In the Caribbean 24 months is pushing it, but it you clean regularly it works.  With ablative paints be sure to clean gently, you do not want to be scrubbing off the paint!

An extra coat within a foot of the waterline, the bow, and the leading edge of the keel, and rudder also help.

I have had excellent experience with Micron66 in the colder waters of San Francisco Bay on my old boat.  We have avoided using it on Harmonie because we regularly end up going places with relatively fresh water (e.g., Florida Rivers, and the upper Chesapeake).  Micron 66 fails in very short order in freshwater. 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA




---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Dan,

 

I slap a couple of coats on whenever I haul. The Micron 66 is ablative and is going to flake off as it is designed to do. Last summer in Grenada, we put three coats on. It had been two and half year since the last haul and the bottom paint was thin.  When we hauled in Curacao (unexpectedly) a couple of months ago, we had them put two coats on after a light sand. We have no issues with growth or barnacles.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 10:51 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Micron 66 Caribbean experience

 

 

Hello Amel owners,  I know from discussions that many of you use Micron 66 bottom paint in the Caribbean. I'm looking for responses from those with specific experience.  I put 2 coats on the bottom of my boat in Nov of 2017 and sailed the eastern Caribbean for 7 months. We hauled in Curacao last June (the bottom was very clean). We go back in November to sail the western Caribbean for the next 7 months with plans to haul again in June of 2019.  Question for those who have done something similar. Do you just scuff the boat and relaunch and only paint every other year? Or do you put a fresh coat on each year while the boat is out and dry? Looking for boaters with actual experience with this scenario.  As an added note, when the water is clean I regularly go for a swim with a scrubber to keep the bottom clean.  I have the idea that we may be in more places in the western Caribben where I might not want to do that as often.  

 

Thanks, Dan and Lori Carlson, SM387, sv BeBe



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Anchor chain

greatketch@...
 

Chain standards are so....  un-standard!  

Chaineries Limosines claims (and I believe them) that their "Force 7" brand chain is 25% stronger than industry standard G70.  Good for them... 

I see in the Chaineries Limosines catalog two different values for G32 chain, (Chaines cable standard (Norme Grade 32))  5100kg (Industry standard)  and 6400kg (for their "CLi special" grade).  Pretty much what I'd expect.  Their "CLi" grade chain is stronger than industry standard G30, and weaker than industry standard G40.

I could find no rupture testing numbers for G40...

No matter... the take away story is to always check the manufacturer's actual test data for the exact grade you are buying whatever brand chain you choose and be sure you actually get what you are expecting and that you are comparing exactly what you think you are comparing.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA



---In amelyachtowners@..., <mark_pitt@...> wrote :

I recently purchased the G70 chain from Chaineries Limosines, Amel’s provider.  Their catalog gives a rupture strength of 6400 kg for the G40 and 11200 kg for the G70.  That is a 75 percent higher value for the G70.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III, SM419
Lanzarote, Canary Islands 


On Aug 27, 2018, at 8:08 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

A small correction:  The difference in strength between galvanized G40 and G70 is not anywhere near a factor of 2, it  is actually more like 20%.  G70 chain is, however, roughly 2X as strong as G30 ("BBB"), so that might be where that number comes from.

According to the data I have, the specified breaking strength for G40 is 16,200 lbs, while for G70 it is 19,800.  Working Load Limits (WLL) is usually specified for these kinds of alloy chains as 1/3 the breaking strength.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Super Maramu keel bolts size

Alin SM 283
 

Hello everyone. My boat, Wanderer, SM #283 undergoes extensive upgrading and maintenance in NZ. She will be a skippered charter in Bay of Islands. As part of the process , my surveyor wants to check keel bolts. I found an option to ultrasound them, but they were asking for all the keel bolts size and specs of material. Can someone please help me with this? I need to know diameter, length and material specs ( what sort of SS). Thank you. All the best from Alin, Wanderer SM2k#283


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Anchor chain

Mark Pitt
 

I recently purchased the G70 chain from Chaineries Limosines, Amel’s provider.  Their catalog gives a rupture strength of 6400 kg for the G40 and 11200 kg for the G70.  That is a 75 percent higher value for the G70.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III, SM419
Lanzarote, Canary Islands 


On Aug 27, 2018, at 8:08 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

A small correction:  The difference in strength between galvanized G40 and G70 is not anywhere near a factor of 2, it  is actually more like 20%.  G70 chain is, however, roughly 2X as strong as G30 ("BBB"), so that might be where that number comes from.

According to the data I have, the specified breaking strength for G40 is 16,200 lbs, while for G70 it is 19,800.  Working Load Limits (WLL) is usually specified for these kinds of alloy chains as 1/3 the breaking strength.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Anchor chain

greatketch@...
 

A small correction:  The difference in strength between galvanized G40 and G70 is not anywhere near a factor of 2, it  is actually more like 20%.  G70 chain is, however, roughly 2X as strong as G30 ("BBB"), so that might be where that number comes from.

According to the data I have, the specified breaking strength for G40 is 16,200 lbs, while for G70 it is 19,800.  Working Load Limits (WLL) is usually specified for these kinds of alloy chains as 1/3 the breaking strength.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Anchor chain

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Paul,

I too have an Amel 54 and am replacing my rusty chain. 

If you have the same as me it will be 10mm ISO and grade 70.

There are two options on the galvanised chain readily available, namely grade 40 or grade 70. The strength of the 70 is about double that of the 40. 

I could not find 70 in the West indies so waited until I came back to Europe. Amel originally specified grade 70.from Chaineries Limousines. So that is what I have ordered and at a very good price: 100m for  about 1200 euros delivered to the Canary islands.

To answer you question on measuring: the best way is to count ten links; if the length is 315 mm then it is ISO if it is 295 then it is DIN. Then the thickness of the actual wire will be either 10mm or 12mm. In practice the ten links may be slightly more say 320mm due to stretch. 

Nick

Amelia( Amel 54 Tenerife)

On 27 Aug 2018, at 18:00, sharongbrown@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi all,

Some questions about anchor chain:

1. How do Iknow what size it is? Do I measure the internal/external longways diameter of a link?
2. Should I be concerned about a bit of rust - is there a point at which I should know it needs replacing?
3. What is the best type of chain available in the WIndwards/Leewards to replace it with?

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98





Anchor chain

ya_fohi
 

Hi all,

Some questions about anchor chain:

1. How do Iknow what size it is? Do I measure the internal/external longways diameter of a link?
2. Should I be concerned about a bit of rust - is there a point at which I should know it needs replacing?
3. What is the best type of chain available in the WIndwards/Leewards to replace it with?

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Patrick McAneny
 

Bob, That looks like a good price on the seat , 33% off , significantly less than on Ebay. I just order one and shipping was free.
Thanks,
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: mfmcgovern@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Mon, Aug 27, 2018 8:54 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 
Bob,

You are correct.  The manufacturer in China got back to me and said that Vetus is their main reseller in the USA.

Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale MD USA


---In amelyachtowners@..., <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote :

I think Vetus sells one they call the Ferry seat....should have a US supplier...  https://www.mauriprosailing.com/us/product/VTSCHTBSW.html
(sold without pedestal)

Bob, KAIMI SM 429
Cannes


Re: Santorin spinnaker question

greatketch@...
 

Herbert,

The stainless part that Olivier photographed is called by riggers in the USA a "Spinnaker Crane."  

There are several models available prefabricated commercially.  I am not sure if any of the available models are large/strong enough, but if you can find an appropriate one it might be more economical than a fully custom project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Santorin spinnaker question

Herbert Lackner
 

Hi Olivier,  thx for the pictures, this was exactly what I was looking for.  I will do it in a similar way. you are always such a great help!

herbert
SN120 KALI MERA



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

rossirossix4
 

I think Vetus sells one they call the Ferry seat....should have a US supplier...  https://www.mauriprosailing.com/us/product/VTSCHTBSW.html
(sold without pedestal)

Bob, KAIMI SM 429
Cannes


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Alan Leslie
 

Thanks John,
i don't have any difficulty...I have the seat!
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

JOHN HAYES
 

Alan if you have difficulty I could possibly help; but not until the last week in September when I return to NZ from Central Asia.

 

My direct email is johnhayes862@...

 

Cheers

 

John Hayes

Ngawaka

 

Wellington

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: mfmcgovern@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: Saturday, 25 August 2018 5:59 a.m.
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 

 

Alan's nav station seat appears to be manufactured in China by a company called Eastsun Marine:  http://www.eastsunmarine.com/eastsun/EnProductShow.asp?ID=152

 

I could not find it for sale anywhere except for where Alan purchased it, Burnsco in New Zealand:  https://www.burnsco.co.nz/shop/boating/seating-carpet-covers/seating/deluxe-flip-back-seat

 

I sent the company an email to see if they would ship to the USA, and if so, how much.  I will let you know if I hear back from them.

 

Mark McGovern

SM #440 Cara

Deale, MD USA

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Iridium Go Antenna

karkauai
 

That’s where mine is, Pat.

I get great reception and couldn’t be happier with it.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

On Aug 25, 2018, at 10:26 AM, sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

The easiest place for me to mount the antenna would be on the very aft starboard railing , however that means the antenna would be partially blocked from a clear view of the sky by my arch with solar panels. I guess one quadrant would be blocked , I know the signal would be better with a clear view ,but is it essential to having a good signal? It is the same location as my GPS antenna and those signals seem strong.

Thanks,

Pat

SM123


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