Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

Brent Cameron
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi All

Whilst on this topic, I heard somewhere that there may be a rally which sails out of the Caribbean at the start of the hurricane season, around via Colombia etc and back to the Caribbean in the next safe season. Does anyone here know if there is such a rally, and what it was called?

Colin
SV Island Pearl II, SM#332
Mahangura, Madagascar
(waiting for weather to cross to Cape Town)

On Tue, Aug 28, 2018 at 5:36 PM Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Steve, Presently there are three Amels signed up with the Salty Dogs for the fall rally to the Caribbean. This will be my third trip south with them, it cost about $200 to join the rally, and in the past  you could more than recoup that ,as one of the benefits was free moorings for a month. Now that the Bitter End is out of business that is probably no longer available.Other than that there is a few parties ,weather routing , daily weather routing from Chris Parker daily via SSB. ,daily check ins via SSB ,daily tracking , crew placement . The boats gather in Hampton Va. a few days before departure. Is it worth it,I don't know ,its cool to look at all the offshore boats in one place and to meet some of the people you have something in common with. I think it lends some sense of security to some , probably somewhat a false sense, once out there you are on your own, and within a few hours out of sight of other boats. With the advent of many weather sites ,such as Predict Wind and the ability to access it offshore ,there is no compelling reason to join the rally,but then none not to.

Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tue, Aug 28, 2018 8:57 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

 
Hello all. The 4 of us here on TouRai (SM380) are considering doing the Salty Dog Rally to the BVI in November and are wondering if others have done it previously or may be doing it this year? Any thoughts or opinions (this group...) about it?

All the best,
Steve Morrison
SV TouRai SM 380
Portland, Maine



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Toe pulley (headsail)

greatketch@...
 

Maude has just told use that she has these in stock. If they are not in stock, they might not be easy to get from Amel.  The ones we have are cast parts and not cheaply made in small quantities.

We have been lucky that we had the in-stock boat spares sufficient to replace ours--this time!

If you get new ones, be SURE to install them with LOTS of Lanocte, Tef-gel, or whatever other flavor of anticorrosion magic goop you prefer. Use it everywhere between stainless and aluminum. The ones on our boat had been installed "dry", and the resulting corrosion of the aluminum in contact with stainless was what destroyed them--of course on the bottom first where we couldn't see it happening!

With just a little bit of redesign, these can be easily made by conventional machining.  I have the dimensions taken off ours in case we ever need new ones and Amel's stock is depleted.  If people are interested, I can finish and post the drawings for a standard machine shop build.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

Peter Forbes
 

Colin, 

the World ARC does the circumnavigation. www.worldcruising.com.


Peter Forbes
0044 7836 209730
Carango  Sailing Ketch
Amel 54 #035
In La Rochelle

On 28 Aug 2018, at 15:48, Sailing Island Pearl colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi All

Whilst on this topic, I heard somewhere that there may be a rally which sails out of the Caribbean at the start of the hurricane season, around via Colombia etc and back to the Caribbean in the next safe season. Does anyone here know if there is such a rally, and what it was called?

Colin
SV Island Pearl II, SM#332
Mahangura, Madagascar
(waiting for weather to cross to Cape Town)

On Tue, Aug 28, 2018 at 5:36 PM Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Steve, Presently there are three Amels signed up with the Salty Dogs for the fall rally to the Caribbean. This will be my third trip south with them, it cost about $200 to join the rally, and in the past  you could more than recoup that ,as one of the benefits was free moorings for a month. Now that the Bitter End is out of business that is probably no longer available.Other than that there is a few parties ,weather routing , daily weather routing from Chris Parker daily via SSB. ,daily check ins via SSB ,daily tracking , crew placement . The boats gather in Hampton Va. a few days before departure. Is it worth it,I don't know ,its cool to look at all the offshore boats in one place and to meet some of the people you have something in common with. I think it lends some sense of security to some , probably somewhat a false sense, once out there you are on your own, and within a few hours out of sight of other boats. With the advent of many weather sites ,such as Predict Wind and the ability to access it offshore ,there is no compelling reason to join the rally,but then none not to.

Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tue, Aug 28, 2018 8:57 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

 
Hello all. The 4 of us here on TouRai (SM380) are considering doing the Salty Dog Rally to the BVI in November and are wondering if others have done it previously or may be doing it this year? Any thoughts or opinions (this group...) about it?

All the best,
Steve Morrison 
SV TouRai SM 380
Portland, Maine



-- 
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

Patrick McAneny
 

Steve, I think you made a very good point and if you decide to join a rally, you should never relinquish decision making to others. On my first trip with them they were prepared to leave with a low pressure system off Fla., I decided I was not going to leave until I could see what it was going to do, two days later it exploded , they then decided not to depart. With or without a rally ,you need to be responsible for you and your crew and always make your own calls. Boats in rallies don't all depart at the same time ,some leave earlier ,some at the same time and some later ,making  their own determinations as to the best window.
Pat
SM 123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Aug 28, 2018 9:46 am
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

 
Steve,
 
I am not a big fan of rallies. I think it is best to not be on someone else’s schedule and leave when the weather is right.  
 
A few years ago the Salty Dog group got the snot beat out of them because they missed a weather window and waited two days for the scheduled leave date. We departed in the window and had a great sail.
 
Just my 2 cents worth. Although, I can see how the camaraderie of the rally’s would be appealing.
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Bonaire
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 8:57 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally
 
 
Hello all. The 4 of us here on TouRai (SM380) are considering doing the Salty Dog Rally to the BVI in November and are wondering if others have done it previously or may be doing it this year? Any thoughts or opinions (this group...) about it?

All the best,
Steve Morrison
SV TouRai SM 380
Portland, Maine


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

Mark Erdos
 

Steve,

 

I am not a big fan of rallies. I think it is best to not be on someone else’s schedule and leave when the weather is right.  

 

A few years ago the Salty Dog group got the snot beat out of them because they missed a weather window and waited two days for the scheduled leave date. We departed in the window and had a great sail.

 

Just my 2 cents worth. Although, I can see how the camaraderie of the rally’s would be appealing.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 8:57 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

 

 

Hello all. The 4 of us here on TouRai (SM380) are considering doing the Salty Dog Rally to the BVI in November and are wondering if others have done it previously or may be doing it this year? Any thoughts or opinions (this group...) about it?

All the best,
Steve Morrison
SV TouRai SM 380
Portland, Maine


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

Patrick McAneny
 

Steve, Presently there are three Amels signed up with the Salty Dogs for the fall rally to the Caribbean. This will be my third trip south with them, it cost about $200 to join the rally, and in the past  you could more than recoup that ,as one of the benefits was free moorings for a month. Now that the Bitter End is out of business that is probably no longer available.Other than that there is a few parties ,weather routing , daily weather routing from Chris Parker daily via SSB. ,daily check ins via SSB ,daily tracking , crew placement . The boats gather in Hampton Va. a few days before departure. Is it worth it,I don't know ,its cool to look at all the offshore boats in one place and to meet some of the people you have something in common with. I think it lends some sense of security to some , probably somewhat a false sense, once out there you are on your own, and within a few hours out of sight of other boats. With the advent of many weather sites ,such as Predict Wind and the ability to access it offshore ,there is no compelling reason to join the rally,but then none not to.
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Aug 28, 2018 8:57 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salty Dog Rally

 
Hello all. The 4 of us here on TouRai (SM380) are considering doing the Salty Dog Rally to the BVI in November and are wondering if others have done it previously or may be doing it this year? Any thoughts or opinions (this group...) about it?

All the best,
Steve Morrison
SV TouRai SM 380
Portland, Maine


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Deck light / Steaming light SM2000

greatketch@...
 

Alan,

If that fixture does not match your configuration, raise your hand.  Ours is different.  We have  separate light fixtures for steaming light and deck light.  I can dig up the fixture information for that set up...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Salty Dog Rally

steve_morrison@...
 

Hello all. The 4 of us here on TouRai (SM380) are considering doing the Salty Dog Rally to the BVI in November and are wondering if others have done it previously or may be doing it this year? Any thoughts or opinions (this group...) about it?

All the best,
Steve Morrison
SV TouRai SM 380
Portland, Maine


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Toe pulley (headsail)

Kelly Ran
 

Hi James,

No news yet, our friend is having various printing issues. Will post updates when we have progress!

Kelly + Ryan
SM233 Iteration
Boston



On Mon, Aug 27, 2018, 22:29 James Cromie jamescromie@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Any luck with your traveller sheave design?  


I’m very interested to know!

James
Soteria 
SM 347
On Aug 10, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Kelly Ran naryllek@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Salut,

We have the same problem with one of ours.
I modeled the pulley, and we are having a test unit printed out of 316 stainless. (See attached.) My guess is that it will take a couple of iterations to get this part completely right. Will let you know how it turns out.

Kelly + Ryan
SM233 Iteration 
Boston


On Thu, Aug 9, 2018 at 10:58 AM, jlm@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from jlm@... [amelyachtowners] included below]

Bonjour,

On my Super Maramu 2000 I have the two pulley cracked ! (they are maked "AMEL")

Amel have no delivery time for this spare part .......

It seams that I am not the only one with this problem ....

Did any one of you solved this without AMEL part ?

Merci

JL MERTZ

Cottonbay.fr






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Deck light / Steaming light SM2000

Mark Erdos
 

Alan,

 

Here you go:

 

Series 41 Masthead/Foredeck Light, White

Vessels up to 65' (20 m) | 3 NM visibility | 50 Watt foredeck light

By: Aqua Signal

 

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/aqua-signal-series-41-masthead-foredeck-light-white-41405-1

 

You will need to change the bulbs to 24v.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 2:49 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Deck light / Steaming light SM2000

 

 

Does anyone know the make / model of the light on the main mast ?

 

I broke ours today with some mishandling of the gennaker halyard.

 

Thanks

 

Alan

Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

Ian Townsend
 

That was a 1996 SM named Makoko.

Ian & Margaret
S/V Loca Lola II 
SM153
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA

On Aug 28, 2018, at 2:43 AM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

It was a Super Maramu.

We were in Suvarov that year.
We were in the same anchorage as that boat in Bora Bora.
We left for Suvarov and they stayed.
They arrived at Suvarov a few days after we left for Samoa.
They bought the boat in the Carribean and were sailing it to Australia.
I think the name of it was  Amelia ?..or something like that
this article talks about it ...but it was a Super Maramu


Cheers
Alan
Elyse Sm437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu keel bolts size

Alin SM 283
 

Hi.
I sent a separate email to Olivier.  I hoped that there is someone that would know this.
Thank you.
Alin


On Tue, 28 Aug 2018 at 20:08, Ann-Sofie Svanberg kanalmamman@... [amelyachtowners]
wrote:
 

Have you asked Amel about that? That is the only way, I think, to get an absolute correct answer.

/Annsofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232, 1998

Skickat från min iPad

27 aug. 2018 kl. 21:35 skrev alin1923@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hello everyone. My boat, Wanderer, SM #283 undergoes extensive upgrading and maintenance in NZ. She will be a skippered charter in Bay of Islands. As part of the process , my surveyor wants to check keel bolts. I found an option to ultrasound them, but they were asking for all the keel bolts size and specs of material. Can someone please help me with this? I need to know diameter, length and material specs ( what sort of SS). Thank you. All the best from Alin, Wanderer SM2k#283


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu keel bolts size

Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

Have you asked Amel about that? That is the only way, I think, to get an absolute correct answer.

/Annsofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232, 1998

Skickat från min iPad

27 aug. 2018 kl. 21:35 skrev alin1923@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hello everyone. My boat, Wanderer, SM #283 undergoes extensive upgrading and maintenance in NZ. She will be a skippered charter in Bay of Islands. As part of the process , my surveyor wants to check keel bolts. I found an option to ultrasound them, but they were asking for all the keel bolts size and specs of material. Can someone please help me with this? I need to know diameter, length and material specs ( what sort of SS). Thank you. All the best from Alin, Wanderer SM2k#283


Deck light / Steaming light SM2000

Alan Leslie
 

Does anyone know the make / model of the light on the main mast ?


I broke ours today with some mishandling of the gennaker halyard.


Thanks


Alan

Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

Alan Leslie
 

It was a Super Maramu.
We were in Suvarov that year.
We were in the same anchorage as that boat in Bora Bora.
We left for Suvarov and they stayed.
They arrived at Suvarov a few days after we left for Samoa.
They bought the boat in the Carribean and were sailing it to Australia.
I think the name of it was  Amelia ?..or something like that

Cheers
Alan
Elyse Sm437


Anchor chain Tigress Windlass Replacement

rossirossix4
 

Kent is right about the gypsy.  The size should be on the face of the gypsy that meets the chain.  Sometimes you may need to scrub it a bit to see it.
 
On a related matter, if any of you are in Europe, SVB24 (the West Marine of Europe) will sell you a brand new 24V Tigress for €1094 (sor some reason they did not charge me VAT and it was €29 shipping to Malta),  The windlass showed signs of abuse from a previous owner.   In considering the costs of labor and parts for a diagnosis and rebuild (plus the uncertainty of rebuilt machinery) we opted for a new one.  We were able to salvage most parts and including the motor (which was not the issue) so you end up with spares. Reused the chain counter ring and switch housing. https://www.svb24.com/en/lofrans-tigres-windlass.html   When ordering  they let you specify a DIN 766 or ISO gypsy
.
Bob , KAIMI SM 429

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Toe pulley (headsail) [2 Attachments]

James Cromie
 

Any luck with your traveller sheave design?  

I’m very interested to know!

James
Soteria 
SM 347

On Aug 10, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Kelly Ran naryllek@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Salut,

We have the same problem with one of ours.
I modeled the pulley, and we are having a test unit printed out of 316 stainless. (See attached.) My guess is that it will take a couple of iterations to get this part completely right. Will let you know how it turns out.

Kelly + Ryan
SM233 Iteration 
Boston


On Thu, Aug 9, 2018 at 10:58 AM, jlm@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from jlm@... [amelyachtowners] included below]

Bonjour,

On my Super Maramu 2000 I have the two pulley cracked ! (they are maked "AMEL")

Amel have no delivery time for this spare part .......

It seams that I am not the only one with this problem ....

Did any one of you solved this without AMEL part ?

Merci

JL MERTZ

Cottonbay.fr






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

Patrick McAneny
 

I agree ,it looks to be a SM of an older vintage pre 2000s . Very sad.
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Mon, Aug 27, 2018 7:05 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

 

Sad story....

The pictures are not of a 54 though, it seems to be a SuperMaramu to me. 

Thomas
GARULFO
A54-122
Curaçao 



On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 at 17:45, Nick ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Shipwrecked in shelter

The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz
Brenda Webb
The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz
With huge sighs of relief we dropped anchor in Suwarrow, the remote Pacific atoll in the northern Cook Islands that was once an idyllic home for Kiwi recluse Tom Neale.
My husband David Morgan had read Neale's book, An Island to Oneself, many years ago, delighting in his colourful story of solitary life on Suwarrow in the 1950s, '60s and '70s. It inspired us to take the northern route from French Polynesia to Tonga via this dot on the chart, rather than the southern route through Rarotonga.
After a particularly scruffy five-day passage from the French Polynesia Island of Maupiti, near Bora Bora, we just wanted to drop the hook and sleep. It wasn't to be. At midnight, a gale tore through the anchorage.
Unloading the stricken vessel.
Brenda Webb
Unloading the stricken vessel.
We had left French Polynesia in late July on our Moody 46 Bandit, in 15-20 knot winds. We had some good sailing but, as usual in the tropics, the squalls kept us on our toes. We arrived off Suwarrow in drizzle and overcast skies, and gingerly picked our way through the pass, relieved that our charts were accurate and that the reefs and shoal ground were easy to see from my spot on the bow. In this part of the world, eyeball navigation is essential.
The lagoon was littered with coral heads so it was difficult to find a good place to anchor; we took our time and eventually found a reasonable patch of sand. As usual, we snorkelled down to ensure the anchor was well set and as free from coral as possible. Inquisitive black tipped reef sharks kept an eye on us, and we kept an eye on them as we swam through the tepid turquoise waters. Afterwards we washed five days of accumulated salt water off Bandit, put our wet weather gear out to dry and enjoyed a traditional landfall rum. We soaked up the beauty of this gorgeous setting before sinking into bed.
The gale arrived at midnight, wrenching us from sleep. We raced on deck to find chaos: boats straining at anchor and swinging unpredictably as chains snagged on coral. Our first concern was that we might drag, so David started the engine on and maintained the revs while I grabbed the torch to take a visual on the other boats nearby but it was difficult in driving rain and with no moon.
All sailors know that feeling when you are at the mercy of the elements. We trust our anchor - a 25kg stainless steel Delta - and we had 40m of chain out in 7m depth but I kept wondering whether we would hold. Worse, with such poor visibility, would we know if we were dragging? Given the appalling conditions, we turned on the chart plotter to mark our position and set a drag alarm.
The VHF crackled into life as the boat beside us called to say he felt we were getting too close. His chain had snagged on coral, reducing his swinging room, and he was concerned we would crash into him when we swung. That seemed the least of our worries and nothing a few fenders over the side wouldn't deal with.
In a coral-strewn anchorage, there is always a chance of snagging the chain; sometimes windlasses can be torn from decks. I could see concern on David's face. As the wind increased to 35 knots, I became absolutely terrified.
The last time we'd had strong wind at anchor was on the East Coast of the United States when 53 knots slammed into us without warning, sending us dragging sideways in an anchorage with a soft muddy bottom. We had deployed our second anchor, a Fortress, in record time, and it saved our bacon. Stupidly, this time, because we'd been on passage, the 100m warp was stowed in the aft locker. Due to our tiredness, we had left it there. Bad move.
Then I heard the distinctive graunch of chain on coral, and I screamed over the wind to David. I took the helm while he went to investigate and discovered our thick snubber line; ie, shock absorber, had snapped. He retied it to the chain using a rolling hitch; the stainless steel hook we normally used had dropped from the chain to the sea bed. With the next gust Bandit somehow freed herself from the coral and the graunch sound stopped. Relief washed over us.
At 1am our Australian friends anchored behind us, were alerted by their neighbours that they appeared to be dragging. Steve, the skipper, came on VHF and said he would try to re-anchor. Twenty minutes later he said their anchor chain had broken and all he could do was motor until first light.
As the wind continued to gust, he battled to control Amiable, his Amel 54, and gave us all some anxious moments as he narrowly avoided colliding with other boats, including us. He was obviously struggling to see and, over the VHF, he asked boats to turn on their running lights as he could barely see anchor lights at the mastheads.
David wanted to call on VHF and suggest he go stern-to the wind - a technique he'd learned years ago. When the boat's stern is into wind, it acts like a weather vane and, with revs on, you can sit there for ages. Steve appeared to be doing the opposite - trying to keep his bow into wind - but it kept blowing off. We discussed it, but figured the less chat on VHF the better and we were already busy monitoring our own situation.
We watched with growing concern as Steve's yacht appeared to be blown further away in the gusts and then, with despair, heard Steve come on VHF to say he was on a reef.
The next few hours were a nightmare. A calm, gently spoken American cruiser took control as we mounted a VHF vigil. The American talked Steve and Liz through their options logically, telling them not to abandon ship which was their gut instinct. "Put all your valuables into dry bags in the cockpit and wait for first light." All good advice but it was only 3am. Dawn was hours away.
Steve gave his GPS position which we plotted on the chart. He was against a shallow reef and in no immediate danger of sinking or drifting into deep water. It was impossible to mount any rescue attempt in the atrocious conditions; the wind was screaming and pushing up a choppy swell.
The darkness seemed all-enveloping. The tension in the anchorage was palpable.. Every time I looked out at the yacht on the reef, lit up with deck lights, the waves were crashing more intensely over her bow. What if she was pushed off the reef into deep water - how would we rescue them? What if she broke up?
"That could be us," I kept thinking. Bandit is our home and full of treasures collected over our eight years of cruising in the Mediterranean, Caribbean, Central America, East Coast of the US and the Pacific. It would be unbearable to lose her.
More bad news came. Panicked, Steve came on VHF: they were taking on water through the rudder post, and the bilge pumps were not keeping up. He was told to stuff towels, pillows, bedding and anything else in the hole; keep all the pumps running and start bailing.
Soon Steve reported holes appearing in the hull. The aft cabin and saloon were filling with water. "I really think we need to get off," he said.
The amazingly cool American disagreed. "The water level inside the boat will not rise higher than the water level outside and you still have plenty of freeboard." Incredibly sensible advice; why hadn't we figured that out?
At first light, Suwarrow station ranger Harry Papai was roused and set off in his aluminium boat to rescue a much shaken couple. David went ashore to see what he could do. The priority was retrieving possessions so he donned a wetsuit and reef shoes and headed out to help..
Steve and Liz were still visibly shaken when they came aboard Bandit later that day to send emails to family and their insurance company, drink copious amounts of tea and relate what had been the most terrifying ordeal of their lives. They had been trying to head out of the anchorage into deeper water when a 40 knot gust blew them onto the reef, Steve said. The experience left Liz so traumatised she left on the first cruising yacht heading to American Samoa for a flight to Australia.
Over the next few days as conditions abated, we helped Steve salvage a mountain of gear. Batteries, diesel, sails, ropes, food, all interior fittings including oven and washing machine, clothes and electrics were removed and taken ashore. David even dismounted winches; diesel was pumped from the main tanks. The big fear was polluting this beautiful lagoon. It was a mammoth task and the cruising community rallied to help.
Eventually we felt we'd done all we could and, wanting to leave Suwarrow with good memories we took time out to go snorkelling with manta rays and explore the wonderful coral reefs around the anchorage. As if on cue two humpback whales swam into the anchorage and right around the boats - we sat and watched with awe. The weather was clear and sunny, and as we looked across the flat calm anchorage it seemed unbelievable such drama had unfolded here in this piece of Pacific paradise..
Sadly this wasn't the first boat to come to grief here. Caretaker Harry said he knew of eight boats resting in the lagoon. And until the authorities put down moorings, no doubt more will meet a sticky end.



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shipwrecked in shelter | Stuff.co.nz

Sv Garulfo
 


Sad story...

The pictures are not of a 54 though, it seems to be a SuperMaramu to me. 

Thomas
GARULFO
A54-122
Curaçao 



On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 at 17:45, Nick ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Shipwrecked in shelter

The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz

Brenda Webb

The saloon was waist deep in water. Subscribe to Boating NZ at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz

With huge sighs of relief we dropped anchor in Suwarrow, the remote Pacific atoll in the northern Cook Islands that was once an idyllic home for Kiwi recluse Tom Neale.

My husband David Morgan had read Neale's book, An Island to Oneself, many years ago, delighting in his colourful story of solitary life on Suwarrow in the 1950s, '60s and '70s. It inspired us to take the northern route from French Polynesia to Tonga via this dot on the chart, rather than the southern route through Rarotonga.

After a particularly scruffy five-day passage from the French Polynesia Island of Maupiti, near Bora Bora, we just wanted to drop the hook and sleep. It wasn't to be. At midnight, a gale tore through the anchorage.

Unloading the stricken vessel.

Brenda Webb

Unloading the stricken vessel.

We had left French Polynesia in late July on our Moody 46 Bandit, in 15-20 knot winds. We had some good sailing but, as usual in the tropics, the squalls kept us on our toes. We arrived off Suwarrow in drizzle and overcast skies, and gingerly picked our way through the pass, relieved that our charts were accurate and that the reefs and shoal ground were easy to see from my spot on the bow. In this part of the world, eyeball navigation is essential.

The lagoon was littered with coral heads so it was difficult to find a good place to anchor; we took our time and eventually found a reasonable patch of sand. As usual, we snorkelled down to ensure the anchor was well set and as free from coral as possible. Inquisitive black tipped reef sharks kept an eye on us, and we kept an eye on them as we swam through the tepid turquoise waters. Afterwards we washed five days of accumulated salt water off Bandit, put our wet weather gear out to dry and enjoyed a traditional landfall rum. We soaked up the beauty of this gorgeous setting before sinking into bed.

The gale arrived at midnight, wrenching us from sleep. We raced on deck to find chaos: boats straining at anchor and swinging unpredictably as chains snagged on coral. Our first concern was that we might drag, so David started the engine on and maintained the revs while I grabbed the torch to take a visual on the other boats nearby but it was difficult in driving rain and with no moon.

All sailors know that feeling when you are at the mercy of the elements. We trust our anchor - a 25kg stainless steel Delta - and we had 40m of chain out in 7m depth but I kept wondering whether we would hold. Worse, with such poor visibility, would we know if we were dragging? Given the appalling conditions, we turned on the chart plotter to mark our position and set a drag alarm.

The VHF crackled into life as the boat beside us called to say he felt we were getting too close. His chain had snagged on coral, reducing his swinging room, and he was concerned we would crash into him when we swung. That seemed the least of our worries and nothing a few fenders over the side wouldn't deal with.

In a coral-strewn anchorage, there is always a chance of snagging the chain; sometimes windlasses can be torn from decks. I could see concern on David's face. As the wind increased to 35 knots, I became absolutely terrified.

The last time we'd had strong wind at anchor was on the East Coast of the United States when 53 knots slammed into us without warning, sending us dragging sideways in an anchorage with a soft muddy bottom. We had deployed our second anchor, a Fortress, in record time, and it saved our bacon. Stupidly, this time, because we'd been on passage, the 100m warp was stowed in the aft locker. Due to our tiredness, we had left it there. Bad move.

Then I heard the distinctive graunch of chain on coral, and I screamed over the wind to David. I took the helm while he went to investigate and discovered our thick snubber line; ie, shock absorber, had snapped. He retied it to the chain using a rolling hitch; the stainless steel hook we normally used had dropped from the chain to the sea bed. With the next gust Bandit somehow freed herself from the coral and the graunch sound stopped. Relief washed over us.

At 1am our Australian friends anchored behind us, were alerted by their neighbours that they appeared to be dragging. Steve, the skipper, came on VHF and said he would try to re-anchor. Twenty minutes later he said their anchor chain had broken and all he could do was motor until first light.

As the wind continued to gust, he battled to control Amiable, his Amel 54, and gave us all some anxious moments as he narrowly avoided colliding with other boats, including us. He was obviously struggling to see and, over the VHF, he asked boats to turn on their running lights as he could barely see anchor lights at the mastheads.

David wanted to call on VHF and suggest he go stern-to the wind - a technique he'd learned years ago. When the boat's stern is into wind, it acts like a weather vane and, with revs on, you can sit there for ages. Steve appeared to be doing the opposite - trying to keep his bow into wind - but it kept blowing off. We discussed it, but figured the less chat on VHF the better and we were already busy monitoring our own situation.

We watched with growing concern as Steve's yacht appeared to be blown further away in the gusts and then, with despair, heard Steve come on VHF to say he was on a reef.

The next few hours were a nightmare. A calm, gently spoken American cruiser took control as we mounted a VHF vigil. The American talked Steve and Liz through their options logically, telling them not to abandon ship which was their gut instinct. "Put all your valuables into dry bags in the cockpit and wait for first light." All good advice but it was only 3am. Dawn was hours away.

Steve gave his GPS position which we plotted on the chart. He was against a shallow reef and in no immediate danger of sinking or drifting into deep water. It was impossible to mount any rescue attempt in the atrocious conditions; the wind was screaming and pushing up a choppy swell.

The darkness seemed all-enveloping. The tension in the anchorage was palpable. Every time I looked out at the yacht on the reef, lit up with deck lights, the waves were crashing more intensely over her bow. What if she was pushed off the reef into deep water - how would we rescue them? What if she broke up?

"That could be us," I kept thinking. Bandit is our home and full of treasures collected over our eight years of cruising in the Mediterranean, Caribbean, Central America, East Coast of the US and the Pacific. It would be unbearable to lose her.

More bad news came. Panicked, Steve came on VHF: they were taking on water through the rudder post, and the bilge pumps were not keeping up. He was told to stuff towels, pillows, bedding and anything else in the hole; keep all the pumps running and start bailing.

Soon Steve reported holes appearing in the hull. The aft cabin and saloon were filling with water. "I really think we need to get off," he said.

The amazingly cool American disagreed. "The water level inside the boat will not rise higher than the water level outside and you still have plenty of freeboard." Incredibly sensible advice; why hadn't we figured that out?

At first light, Suwarrow station ranger Harry Papai was roused and set off in his aluminium boat to rescue a much shaken couple. David went ashore to see what he could do. The priority was retrieving possessions so he donned a wetsuit and reef shoes and headed out to help.

Steve and Liz were still visibly shaken when they came aboard Bandit later that day to send emails to family and their insurance company, drink copious amounts of tea and relate what had been the most terrifying ordeal of their lives. They had been trying to head out of the anchorage into deeper water when a 40 knot gust blew them onto the reef, Steve said. The experience left Liz so traumatised she left on the first cruising yacht heading to American Samoa for a flight to Australia.

Over the next few days as conditions abated, we helped Steve salvage a mountain of gear. Batteries, diesel, sails, ropes, food, all interior fittings including oven and washing machine, clothes and electrics were removed and taken ashore. David even dismounted winches; diesel was pumped from the main tanks. The big fear was polluting this beautiful lagoon. It was a mammoth task and the cruising community rallied to help.

Eventually we felt we'd done all we could and, wanting to leave Suwarrow with good memories we took time out to go snorkelling with manta rays and explore the wonderful coral reefs around the anchorage. As if on cue two humpback whales swam into the anchorage and right around the boats - we sat and watched with awe. The weather was clear and sunny, and as we looked across the flat calm anchorage it seemed unbelievable such drama had unfolded here in this piece of Pacific paradise.

Sadly this wasn't the first boat to come to grief here. Caretaker Harry said he knew of eight boats resting in the lagoon. And until the authorities put down moorings, no doubt more will meet a sticky end.



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