Date   

Re: Sand Blasting

amelforme
 

Hi Pat. Before you paint the bottom or apply any coatings, be certain to have the bottom checked with a moisture meter over its entire surface. It states in the Amel owner’s manual in the third section of the users guide several things about using high pressure washing below the waterline. It says to never use more than 1130 psi/80 bars of pressure, always from a distance of more than 8 inches/20cm, and at an angle of 45 degrees and never perpendicular. It is generally recognized that using pressure above 2500 psi is detrimental to any polyester or epoxy resin fiberglass laminate.

 

Be sure that you have an acceptable level of moisture in the laminates before you proceed to refinishing.

 

I have seen first hand the detrimental effects that extreme high pressure washing can produce and it is never pretty. If you would find it helpful, give me a call after you get your moisture readings and I’ll give you some advice based on experience that should be helpful.

 

All the best,

Joel

 

           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.

                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 7:54 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sand Blasting

 

James, There was one area ,about 8 sq. inches where there must have been a void where the first or last layer of fiberglass was partially removed ,the manager said that sand blasting would have opened it up as well. It will be a simple fix and I will be doing about three or four coats of barrier coat . There is no other area where all the paint was removed ,so no damage to the gel coat,after a light sanding the gel coat is as smooth as can be. The yard did not consult with me on power washing as opposed to sandblasting ,which concerned me ,but I am glad they went with it. 

Thanks,

Pat

 

-----Original Message-----
From: James Alton via groups.io <lokiyawl2@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Aug 17, 2020 7:56 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sand Blasting

Pat,

 

   This sounds like an interesting option to me and apparently there was no damage done to your gel coat.   I like the fact that you avoided using harsh chemicals.  You also checked your boats bottom for loose putty and voids in this process whether you realize it, since 5000 PSI can take anything off that is not well attached and can open up voids near the surface!  I had the bottom of my boat checked with an ultrasound during the initial surgery looking for voids, delaminations etc. and non were found.  That would not be the case on many non Amel hulls.  It seems that Amel does a very good job with their laminations in getting out all of the air, especially at the critical gel coat interface.  Really glad that this worked out for you.

 

James

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

On Aug 17, 2020, at 5:02 PM, Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32@...> wrote:

 

A few weeks ago I mentioned that I intended to have by boat sandblasted , I paid for it ,but they did something different,maybe better. I went to see what progress had been made on repairs . The bottom paint ,several layers was mostly gone ,with maybe a half thin coat still attached to the hull. I was confused ,since I expected it to be blasted down to the gel coat . What they did was to use a 5000 psi powerwasher with a rotating turbo head which blasted most of the paint off . I missed that part ,but while I was there a workman used a 7" orbital sander with 60 grit to take it the rest of the way down to the gel coat. He did a 20 sq. ft. area in about 15 minutes . So it should take about 9 hrs of sanding. What he did looks perfect and no concerns for damage to the gel coat. 
Just thought I would put this out there, as another option to sand or soda blasting
Pat
SM Shenanigans 

 


Re: Water hoses in engine room

Kevin Fox
 

Vic,

I'm no expert, but here are my experiences.  I've recently replaced a lot of the engine room hoses on Rascal due to rusted hose clamps, stiff hoses, and to simplify some non-Amel modifications.

1. I've been using various grades of Trident hose for fresh and sea water.  They are mostly transparent but reinforced with either fiber or a PVC helix.  It's helpful to be able to see whether liquid is inside, particularly when troubleshooting a bilge pump issue.
2. Doubling the hose clamps is dependent upon the length of the fitting that the hose slips over.  If the fitting is too short, adding a second hose clamp can do more harm than good.  If there's room, I've used two.  Be sure to look for good quality stainless steel hose clamps, preferably not the perforated type.
3. I don't know.  Rascal had a minimal number of valves in the water systems and I've kept it that way.  I added a lot of isolation valves when re-plumbing my house, and they weren't worth the trouble.  I replaced a couple leaking metallic valves on Rascal's water maker with PVC valves.  I'll be watching to see how well they hold up.  
4. A ratcheting pipe cutter or flexible tubing cutter will make your job much easier by giving fast, clean cuts:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-Flexible-Tube-Cutter-97642/304217583?modalType=drawer
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-1-1-4-in-Ratcheting-PVC-Cutter-16PL0101-1/304217581?modalType=drawer
A heat gun is very helpful for both removal and installation of hoses.  I use a cordless one, which avoids combining AC voltages with work close to water:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-18-Volt-ONE-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Heat-Gun-Tool-Only-P3150/306925921?modalType=drawer
5. You need to use hose that is reinforced so that it doesn't collapse under the vacuum of the bilge pumps.  It will be sold as bilge hose.
6. I ordered my materials online from Defender.  I wasn't able to use a local supplier, but I'm sure there are a few in San Diego.  The reason I've been using Trident hose is simply because that's what Defender sells.
7. I don't know.  I do frequent visual checks, and my family knows to report any water where there shouldn't be water, or any pumps running at unexpected times.
8. I believe there are some topics here on cleaning water heaters.  I haven't tried it.  I just replaced ours due to a slow leak in the tank.

-- 
Kevin and Elise Fox
SM404 Rascal
Charleston, SC


Re: Wifi extenders and the bonding system

Robert Giroux
 

Unfortunately, from Bitstorm website:

 

“As of March 2020, Bitstorm made the decision to cease production of its high power Wi-Fi systems. A number of factors caused this decision and included supply chain issues, manufacturing and staffing as a direct result of the Covid-19 virus. Sales of remaining inventory will continue for as long as available. Customers will continue to receive support for any issues on a best effort basis.”

 

There are however many companies “marketing” this type of WiFi bridge device. They all probably start out in one or two Chinese factories and receive a few differentiating components and/or specs, then branding and packaging. Ubiquity even has a titanium bodied one!

 

 

Regards,

Robert Giroux

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arno Luijten
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 7:43 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Wifi extenders and the bonding system

 

Scott,

my point was not the radiation pattern of your own antenna per se, the access point has a radiation pattern as well. It takes two to tango in this case as the communication is bi-directional, even if you are just downloading. 

What kind of connection is there between the antenna and the rest of the system? Myself I’m using a device called “Badboy” and that has the whole WiFi system build into the base of the antenna. There is only Ethernet cable coming from it connected to a POE adapter and subsequently to a Draytek 4G router. This chooses which connection to use (4G/Badboy) depending on available bandwidth.

The Badboy is isolated from everything apart from the POE injector and the Router.

Cheers,

Arno


Re: Sand Blasting

Patrick McAneny
 

James, There was one area ,about 8 sq. inches where there must have been a void where the first or last layer of fiberglass was partially removed ,the manager said that sand blasting would have opened it up as well. It will be a simple fix and I will be doing about three or four coats of barrier coat . There is no other area where all the paint was removed ,so no damage to the gel coat,after a light sanding the gel coat is as smooth as can be. The yard did not consult with me on power washing as opposed to sandblasting ,which concerned me ,but I am glad they went with it. 
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: James Alton via groups.io <lokiyawl2@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Aug 17, 2020 7:56 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sand Blasting

Pat,

   This sounds like an interesting option to me and apparently there was no damage done to your gel coat.   I like the fact that you avoided using harsh chemicals.  You also checked your boats bottom for loose putty and voids in this process whether you realize it, since 5000 PSI can take anything off that is not well attached and can open up voids near the surface!  I had the bottom of my boat checked with an ultrasound during the initial surgery looking for voids, delaminations etc. and non were found.  That would not be the case on many non Amel hulls.  It seems that Amel does a very good job with their laminations in getting out all of the air, especially at the critical gel coat interface.  Really glad that this worked out for you.

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Aug 17, 2020, at 5:02 PM, Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32@...> wrote:

A few weeks ago I mentioned that I intended to have by boat sandblasted , I paid for it ,but they did something different,maybe better. I went to see what progress had been made on repairs . The bottom paint ,several layers was mostly gone ,with maybe a half thin coat still attached to the hull. I was confused ,since I expected it to be blasted down to the gel coat . What they did was to use a 5000 psi powerwasher with a rotating turbo head which blasted most of the paint off . I missed that part ,but while I was there a workman used a 7" orbital sander with 60 grit to take it the rest of the way down to the gel coat. He did a 20 sq. ft. area in about 15 minutes . So it should take about 9 hrs of sanding. What he did looks perfect and no concerns for damage to the gel coat. 
Just thought I would put this out there, as another option to sand or soda blasting
Pat
SM Shenanigans 


Re: Wifi extenders and the bonding system

Arno Luijten
 

Scott,

my point was not the radiation pattern of your own antenna per se, the access point has a radiation pattern as well. It takes two to tango in this case as the communication is bi-directional, even if you are just downloading. 

What kind of connection is there between the antenna and the rest of the system? Myself I’m using a device called “Badboy” and that has the whole WiFi system build into the base of the antenna. There is only Ethernet cable coming from it connected to a POE adapter and subsequently to a Draytek 4G router. This chooses which connection to use (4G/Badboy) depending on available bandwidth.

The Badboy is isolated from everything apart from the POE injector and the Router.

Cheers,

Arno


Re: Wifi extenders and the bonding system

Scott SV Tengah
 

Gerhard, I am talking about omnidirectional antennas, which I think you call "rod". They do look like a rod. Vertical Beamwidth depends on the dBi gain. If you have a 15dBi gain antenna, it will be around 6 degrees vertically, I think. But it will travel very far.

With a 5dBi antenna, you have 40 degrees vertical beam width. But it won't travel as far.

Vertical beam width vs. dBi

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Wifi extenders and the bonding system

Gerhard Mueller
 

If you have a rod antenna it has horizontally 360 degrees but vertically a very small angle and never more than a few dregrees.
30 degrees are physically not possible.

So this kind of antenna should be installed at nearly the same high as the access point ashore.

However if you have a directional antenna you will have this characteristic as shown in the scheme.
But you have to turn it always to the direction of the access point.


I change the antenna depending of the situation temporary.

--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: Wifi extenders and the bonding system

Scott SV Tengah
 

Thanks everyone for the comments. It seems the logical way to solve this is to isolate the antenna from anything connected to the bonding system. This is what I intend to do as the case is plastic and the originally intended mount point (the N-connector) is the part that is energized.

Bill is correct that the 54, starting in 2010 (per Olivier) started bonding the rigging also. 

I have tried two different Poe injectors. First is the 220vac - 48vdc one that came with my Alfa Tube 2HP. That is isolated between input and output but I surmise because the n connector of the Alfa is still connected to power, the mast still gets energized. Next I tried the simple passive POE injector using 48v that I got from the 24->48v upconverter. Arno - even if the input-output is isolated, I still think the mast would be energized because the Alfa's N connector is energized. If the output is isolated, it wouldn't show up on the Amel bonding system tester. So the only solution is to mount it using the plastic case and in my case, I'll use hose clamps. 

Finally, I've tested different heights and the masthead location gives me the best signal. We had it on the solar arch for over 2 years and apparently the panels themselves interfered with the signal by being well within the "fresnel zone".

https://www.proxim.com/en/products/knowledge-center/calculations/calculations-fresnel-clearance-zone#feet

With the Omni Antenna, yes, it does radiate 360degrees horizontally, but with my 8db antenna, there's around a  30degree vertical beam all around. Remembering my 30-60-90 triangles from 8th grade Geometry, that means the antenna's sweet spot will reach hotspots as long as they are further than twice the distance of the mast height (21x2=42meters). I don't anchor that close to the beach bar! :)


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Wifi extenders and the bonding system

Arno Luijten
 

Scott,

A few things about this. The base of the antenna may be connected to the negative of the power-supply of the WiFi extender. If that is the case, isolate it from the mast.
Second putting your WiFi extender in the top of the mast may seem a good idea but most of the time it’s not. Most WiFi antennas radiate in the horizontal plane as this is where the WiFi clients typically are. So the top of the mast is likely to be above the plane of best field-strength.

There are simple POE injectors for sale on Amazon. They run on several different input voltages and the proper ones are isolated (between input and output). If I remember correctly POE is always 48 volt. 

So putting a proper POE inbetween and lowering the antenna may just be the ticket for you.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Sand Blasting

James Alton
 

Pat,

   This sounds like an interesting option to me and apparently there was no damage done to your gel coat.   I like the fact that you avoided using harsh chemicals.  You also checked your boats bottom for loose putty and voids in this process whether you realize it, since 5000 PSI can take anything off that is not well attached and can open up voids near the surface!  I had the bottom of my boat checked with an ultrasound during the initial surgery looking for voids, delaminations etc. and non were found.  That would not be the case on many non Amel hulls.  It seems that Amel does a very good job with their laminations in getting out all of the air, especially at the critical gel coat interface.  Really glad that this worked out for you.

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Aug 17, 2020, at 5:02 PM, Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32@...> wrote:

A few weeks ago I mentioned that I intended to have by boat sandblasted , I paid for it ,but they did something different,maybe better. I went to see what progress had been made on repairs . The bottom paint ,several layers was mostly gone ,with maybe a half thin coat still attached to the hull. I was confused ,since I expected it to be blasted down to the gel coat . What they did was to use a 5000 psi powerwasher with a rotating turbo head which blasted most of the paint off . I missed that part ,but while I was there a workman used a 7" orbital sander with 60 grit to take it the rest of the way down to the gel coat. He did a 20 sq. ft. area in about 15 minutes . So it should take about 9 hrs of sanding. What he did looks perfect and no concerns for damage to the gel coat. 
Just thought I would put this out there, as another option to sand or soda blasting
Pat
SM Shenanigans 


Re: Wifi extenders and the bonding system

 

Scott,

I hope you guys are safe and healthy.

Since I am a simple person who enjoys simple explanations, let me jump in with what I think will help you. 

The Amel Bonding Checking System on your Amel 54 looks for a connection between the Amel Bonding System and either a positive or a negative connection to the 24-volt battery bank.

Because the A-54, connects many additional things to the Bonding System than previous models, you have a greater chance of some sort of bridge (connection) between things physically mounted on the life rail, lifeline, masts, or anything connected to these things. Boats prior to the 54 did not have all of these additional Bonding System connections. And remember, it could be something the previous owner or his hired technician did. If the Amel Bonding System is compromised by a "wrong" installation somewhere on the boat, 100% of the bonding system is likewise somewhat compromised.

So, when you physically mount a device on the mast or any of the above-interconnected devices, if that device has an internal electrical circuit (+ or -) connected to the case, by mounting it, you have connected 24-volt battery bank voltage to the Amel Bonding System. To further confuse both of us, the Amel Bonding System is almost universally misunderstood by nearly 100% of people you may hire to work on your boat. Something wired or connected wrong by these good-intentioned folks can totally incapacitate the benefit that the Amel Bonding System brings to you.

On another related matter, it seems that nearly all engine repowers that I have recently inspected were done without 12-volt negative isolation. Of course, the C-Drive will likely suffer a long-term death when 12-volt isolation is ignored. I am guessing 4-6 years and poof!

Bill 
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Aug 17, 2020 at 2:07 PM Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Hi all,

This is really a question about bonding, which I'm very weak on. 

We have been using a Wirie Pro wifi extender on our A54 for over 2 years and while the Wirie didn't work that great, I separately used the Ubiquiti Bullet M2HP titanium which was part of the package and that worked great. It was mounted on a plastic Pelican case and therefore electrically isolated.

Recently, it died and I needed a replacement but the Bullet M2hp-Ti is no longer being made. I went for an Alfa Tube 2HP, which is generally quite similar.
https://store.rokland.com/products/alfa-tube-2hp-802-11n-long-distance-outdoor-wi-fi-poe-ap-cpe-ip68

The problem with all these devices is that the antenna port is typically connected internally to device power. So when you mount the device on a rail or on the masthead, it sends voltage to the exterior metal and hence the Amel bonding system. The old Bullet was mounted by Wirie Pro in a plastic Pelican case, but I am almost certain the Bullet's antenna port was connected to power also. The Alfa's design doesn't make it easy to mount on the same Pelican case.
 
Since our A54 is 24v,  I had to use a DC-DC up-converter to get 48v which is then fed into a Passive PoE Injector for my Alfa. The PoE injector is just a simple device that adds power to some of the wire pairs in the the ethernet cable - that is how the device gets power. Once I plugged in the powered ethernet cable into the masthead mounted Alfa, the tester light on our Amel for BOTH + and -  lit up and using a multimeter I saw voltage in our rigging. That is obviously not good.

A few questions:

1) Is the fact that the Alfa runs on 48v and the rest of the boat is at 24v the reason why the Amel tester lights up? If this is the case, I can buy another wifi extender that will run on 24v. That doesn't seem likely as the 24v device's antenna connector would still be energized, but I figured I'd ask.

2) The other option to run the Alfa is a 220vAC power brick run on inverter which then provides 48vDC to the Alfa. Very ineffiecient but in this case, the Amel tester light does NOT light up, probably because the power brick isolates the 48v being provided from the boat's 24v battery circuit? But I presume the rigging is still being energized with 48v? But without a way for the power to complete the circuit through the rigging and get back to the source of the 48vdc (power brick), is this not a problem with respect to corrosion?

I hope my question is explained well enough because my understanding of bonding is quite thin. Many boaters use these wifi extenders and no one has talked about this issue but then again, most of them don't deal with our floating ground bonding system.
 
 
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Sand Blasting

Patrick McAneny
 

A few weeks ago I mentioned that I intended to have by boat sandblasted , I paid for it ,but they did something different,maybe better. I went to see what progress had been made on repairs . The bottom paint ,several layers was mostly gone ,with maybe a half thin coat still attached to the hull. I was confused ,since I expected it to be blasted down to the gel coat . What they did was to use a 5000 psi powerwasher with a rotating turbo head which blasted most of the paint off . I missed that part ,but while I was there a workman used a 7" orbital sander with 60 grit to take it the rest of the way down to the gel coat. He did a 20 sq. ft. area in about 15 minutes . So it should take about 9 hrs of sanding. What he did looks perfect and no concerns for damage to the gel coat. 
Just thought I would put this out there, as another option to sand or soda blasting
Pat
SM Shenanigans 


Wifi extenders and the bonding system

Scott SV Tengah
 

Hi all,

This is really a question about bonding, which I'm very weak on. 

We have been using a Wirie Pro wifi extender on our A54 for over 2 years and while the Wirie didn't work that great, I separately used the Ubiquiti Bullet M2HP titanium which was part of the package and that worked great. It was mounted on a plastic Pelican case and therefore electrically isolated.

Recently, it died and I needed a replacement but the Bullet M2hp-Ti is no longer being made. I went for an Alfa Tube 2HP, which is generally quite similar.
https://store.rokland.com/products/alfa-tube-2hp-802-11n-long-distance-outdoor-wi-fi-poe-ap-cpe-ip68

The problem with all these devices is that the antenna port is typically connected internally to device power. So when you mount the device on a rail or on the masthead, it sends voltage to the exterior metal and hence the Amel bonding system. The old Bullet was mounted by Wirie Pro in a plastic Pelican case, but I am almost certain the Bullet's antenna port was connected to power also. The Alfa's design doesn't make it easy to mount on the same Pelican case.
 
Since our A54 is 24v,  I had to use a DC-DC up-converter to get 48v which is then fed into a Passive PoE Injector for my Alfa. The PoE injector is just a simple device that adds power to some of the wire pairs in the the ethernet cable - that is how the device gets power. Once I plugged in the powered ethernet cable into the masthead mounted Alfa, the tester light on our Amel for BOTH + and -  lit up and using a multimeter I saw voltage in our rigging. That is obviously not good.

A few questions:

1) Is the fact that the Alfa runs on 48v and the rest of the boat is at 24v the reason why the Amel tester lights up? If this is the case, I can buy another wifi extender that will run on 24v. That doesn't seem likely as the 24v device's antenna connector would still be energized, but I figured I'd ask.

2) The other option to run the Alfa is a 220vAC power brick run on inverter which then provides 48vDC to the Alfa. Very ineffiecient but in this case, the Amel tester light does NOT light up, probably because the power brick isolates the 48v being provided from the boat's 24v battery circuit? But I presume the rigging is still being energized with 48v? But without a way for the power to complete the circuit through the rigging and get back to the source of the 48vdc (power brick), is this not a problem with respect to corrosion?

I hope my question is explained well enough because my understanding of bonding is quite thin. Many boaters use these wifi extenders and no one has talked about this issue but then again, most of them don't deal with our floating ground bonding system.
 
 
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Brent Cameron
 

Thanks but I think you are looking for this video…. The other one was a narrowboat guy who seemed happy with his setup.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgoIocPgOug

Brent

On Aug 17, 2020, 1:55 PM -0400, Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222 <Bijorka@...>, wrote:
Je all ,
In the link you find a you Tube Video from victron , it explaniert what Happens Wien you London li battreis with a small ore wrang altinator

Berry intresting

https://youtu.be/ZyIJRjJtCR0
Elja
SM Balu 222


Von meinem iPad gesendet




--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Surveyor in Annapolis area?

Doug Smith
 

A second vote for Mike Previti.  He surveyed two of my previous boats, and when I spoke to him about my upcoming purchase of my Amel 54, he was very knowledgeable about them, and was able to describe things to look for.  Solid guy with tons of practical experience.

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

Deltaville, VA USA

 

From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Aras <aras.grinius@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Monday, August 17, 2020 at 12:57 PM
To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators" <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Surveyor in Annapolis area?

 

Michael Previti. He surveyed my Sharki for Insurance purposes.  He is down in Solomons.

Mike Previti

President; PMC, Inc.

410 610 8761

 

Aras

SV FIASCO Sharki #163 1988

 

On Mon, Aug 17, 2020 at 12:46 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:

Can anyone recommend a good Marine Surveyor for an Amel in Annapolis MD area?

KS




--

Aras Grinius


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

Je all ,
In the link you find a you Tube Video from victron , it explaniert what Happens Wien you London li battreis with a small ore wrang altinator

Berry intresting

https://youtu.be/ZyIJRjJtCR0
Elja
SM Balu 222


Von meinem iPad gesendet


Water hoses in engine room

Vic Fryzel
 

Hi,

For the first time, I'm looking at replacing a lot of or ~all of the hoses/valves that deliver fresh or raw water in the engine room.

Some of mine have become extremely rusted or are a bit split. A lot of the hose clamps are rusted closed. And some of the valves are barely usable because of some corrosion or rust. I'm hoping folks might be able to help me with a few questions:

1. Is there a type or class of hose I need to use? Any other hose requirements? Are transparent hoses okay?
2. Should I be double clamping each hose end?
3. Is there a valve material or SAE/metric requirement for both fresh and salt water?
4. When cutting the hoses, do I need any sort of special tool?
5. Similar questions for the bilge pump hoses specifically. Not sure if there are requirements of these?
6. Any retailers that sell this stuff that come to mind? I have a West Marine close by, but am happy to go elsewhere. For reference my boat is in San Diego right now.
7. After I replace this stuff, is there any specific type of maintenance other than visual inspection to keep things in good working order?
8. For my hot water heater, do folks have any references they could link me to on how to clean it? I don't think it's been cleaned/serviced in 6+ years.

Thanks!
-Vic "Moon Dog" SM248


Re: Surveyor in Annapolis area?

Aras Grinius
 

Michael Previti. He surveyed my Sharki for Insurance purposes.  He is down in Solomons.

Mike Previti

President; PMC, Inc.

410 610 8761


Aras
SV FIASCO Sharki #163 1988


On Mon, Aug 17, 2020 at 12:46 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:
Can anyone recommend a good Marine Surveyor for an Amel in Annapolis MD area?

KS





--
Aras Grinius


Surveyor in Annapolis area?

Kevin Schmit
 

Can anyone recommend a good Marine Surveyor for an Amel in Annapolis MD area?

KS


Re: Anchor washing pump model

Slavko Despotovic
 

I disassembled pump, clean it and put it back as it was. Starts working, but after  30-40 seconds the fuse goes off. I can reset and it starts again and after 30 seconds the fuse gores off. No water comes on anchor. Is there anything that can block the water or the way to anchor?
The pump is REYA A 66B, 24V, 10A

Thank you.

Slavko