Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

Jean-Pierre's MacBook Air <jgermain@...>
 

Hi Gang,

The main ingredient to keeping your AMEL sweet smelling is not to let any”ingredient” go down the galley sinks.

You must become a fanatic of food remains removal from all dishes to be washed.  My 30 year old boat (almost) is always sweet smelling because I am a food waste nazi.. never any bit of food waste in the sinks.

I clean out my bilges by adding a small quantity of bleach to a white wash during washing machine operation.  I also only use liquid shower gels.

“Cleanliness is next to Godliness”….

Merry Christmas


Jean-Pierre Germain
SY Eleuthera, SM007,
Panama




On 25 Dec 2017, at 12:22, 'dancarlson367@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi all,  reviewing this past thread on bilge maintenance.


I am wondering if anyone has tried one of the enzymatic drain maintenance products?


My dad used to be a big fan of one of these products at his home, but I did not experiment with it much.  I believe it is supposed to be friendly to plumbing.  

Always looking for ideas to extend the grey water sump/bilge cleaning cycle.

Thanks and regards, Dan Carlson, SM #387, sv BeBe .



 

Hi everyone.  I have put into the bilge one waterglass of vinegar per week recently.  It has definitely reduced the smell in the engine room and there is no appreciable smell anymore in the cabins.  So this seems the way to go although I suspect I have to increase the dosage if the outside temperatures are in the 30s vs the low 20s now.  Many thanks again everyone for the great help!  Joerg


Joerg Esdorn
Kincsem
Amel 55 no. 53
Currently in Zakinthos, Greece




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

Dan Carlson
 

Hi all,  reviewing this past thread on bilge maintenance.

I am wondering if anyone has tried one of the enzymatic drain maintenance products?


My dad used to be a big fan of one of these products at his home, but I did not experiment with it much.  I believe it is supposed to be friendly to plumbing.  

Always looking for ideas to extend the grey water sump/bilge cleaning cycle.

Thanks and regards, Dan Carlson, SM #387, sv BeBe .



On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 2:56 AM, jhe1313@... [amelyachtowners]
 

Hi everyone.  I have put into the bilge one waterglass of vinegar per week recently.  It has definitely reduced the smell in the engine room and there is no appreciable smell anymore in the cabins.  So this seems the way to go although I suspect I have to increase the dosage if the outside temperatures are in the 30s vs the low 20s now.  Many thanks again everyone for the great help!  Joerg


Joerg Esdorn
Kincsem
Amel 55 no. 53
Currently in Zakinthos, Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insurance

Jean-Pierre's MacBook Air <jgermain@...>
 

I am following this thread too.  

Y Yacht proposed 60% more than my present policy…

Guess I’m not going there…


Jean-PIerre Germain
SY Eleuthera, SM007



On 25 Dec 2017, at 07:28, Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Please provide contact info or your  Y Yacht an English based insurance broker.
MI contact:
Sonsev52 at Gmail

Vladimir
SM345 "LIGE IS GOOD"

On Dec 21, 2017 01:03, "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Paul, If you have trouble contacting Georgetown Marina , they just closed until after the New Years and Nick who will be doing the work on your boat left a couple of days ago for New Zealand and will return in three weeks. I am glad things work out with your insurance.

Happy Holidays,
Pat & Diane
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wed, Dec 20, 2017 1:41 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insurance

 
It has been a few posts concerning Insurance. This is our experience
We hit an underwater breakwater this summer which resulted in rather high cost for the repair. It is not until you have a claim one know if one could trust and recommend the insurer. Today we got the go ahead from the insurer to repair our SM Kerpa. We have had Oliver Beauté to inspect the damage, and Kerpa will be repaired according to his instructions.  All communication with the insurance company has been very prompt and correct. Our Insurer is Y Yacht an English based insurance broker with rather reasonable rates.
 
Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259
 





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Aquarius Tour

SAMET GOLGECI
 


AHOY My Friends;
Wishing you all magical Happy Holidays and smooth sailing!
May you sail right through a Merry Christmas into a Happy New Year 2018.
🤶☃️☃️☃️ 🍾🍾🍾 🥂


(Please excuse typos, this was written on my mobile)

Saygilarimizla / Best Regards / Mit Freundliche Grusse;
 
 
Samet Golgeci
Managing Owner
Finike Yachting Agency
 
Mobile      : +90 542 657 43 03 (Whatsapp Available)
Web         : www.finikeyachting.com
E-mail      : finikeyachting@...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Transitlog Renewals + Check in & out procedures for Turkey + Brokerage
Yacht Guardianage including technical services and maintenance
Real Estate consultancy including organise house repairs + Maintenance
Supervising vacant property + Fresh Provisions & Supplies + Duty Free Diesel
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

2017-12-25 16:42 GMT+03:00 Ken Powers sailingaquarius@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Happy Holidays Amel Owners!

We have owned Aquarius for just about a year now, and would like to thank all of the ALL of you for your emails and comments because Z and I have learned so much for these emails.  The learning curve is big when buying your first boat, especially if your first boat is 53 feet.....  THANKS!

We have a tour of Aquarius at:




Merry Christmas!

Ken Powers
Aquarius SM2K #262
Currently in Panama Shelter Ban Marina 





Aquarius Tour

Ken Powers <sailingaquarius@...>
 

Happy Holidays Amel Owners!

We have owned Aquarius for just about a year now, and would like to thank all of the ALL of you for your emails and comments because Z and I have learned so much for these emails.  The learning curve is big when buying your first boat, especially if your first boat is 53 feet.....  THANKS!

We have a tour of Aquarius at:




Merry Christmas!

Ken Powers
Aquarius SM2K #262
Currently in Panama Shelter Ban Marina 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insurance

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Please provide contact info or your  Y Yacht an English based insurance broker.
MI contact:
Sonsev52 at Gmail

Vladimir
SM345 "LIGE IS GOOD"

On Dec 21, 2017 01:03, "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Paul, If you have trouble contacting Georgetown Marina , they just closed until after the New Years and Nick who will be doing the work on your boat left a couple of days ago for New Zealand and will return in three weeks. I am glad things work out with your insurance.

Happy Holidays,
Pat & Diane
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wed, Dec 20, 2017 1:41 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insurance

 
It has been a few posts concerning Insurance. This is our experience
We hit an underwater breakwater this summer which resulted in rather high cost for the repair. It is not until you have a claim one know if one could trust and recommend the insurer. Today we got the go ahead from the insurer to repair our SM Kerpa. We have had Oliver Beauté to inspect the damage, and Kerpa will be repaired according to his instructions.  All communication with the insurance company has been very prompt and correct. Our Insurer is Y Yacht an English based insurance broker with rather reasonable rates.
 
Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

eric freedman
 

Next you could try the route of the Clipper race from China to California 5700 miles.

Fair Winds on your amazing passage.

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 12:34 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

 

 

It seems their is no correct answer to how much fuel to carry. Like many here have voiced, I hate to motor and love to sail. With that said, every passage has its own challenges, and most of us would rather be prepared for any eventuality. The one thing I’m not prepared to do is roll around for weeks in the ITCZ while waiting for wind, as I’d prefer to quickly get to the wind, and then enjoy a great sail to our destination. 

 

We will be departing Panama in a couple of weeks, and embarking on a nearly 5000 nm journey to Hawaii. We tried to find a longer distance between 2 points of land, but this was the best we could do for now. If you have never looked at this route, it poses some unique problems in the first 1500+ miles. You have to deal with the ITCZ and some other phenomena which can create a huge area of little or no wind before you get to the area of NE trades which will carry you swiftly to Hawaii. I’ve  spoke to one sailor who took 48 days enroute on his Hans Christian 43. We hope to make the trip in 28 to 30 days with our swift SM, and some extra fuel in case I can’t find a way to keep us in some wind early on. In our case we will use a 37 gallon Nauta bladder secured just behind the fuel cap on the aft deck, and 5 twenty liter jerry cans in the life raft locker.  We have a valise life raft which lives on the floor at the nav station when on passage. 

 

We have never carried extra diesel on any passage prior to this, but it seemed  smart this time, and we are happy with the choice. Happy to hear what the rest of you think. Should we take less or more extra diesel?  How about you Bill K...would you take any extra?

 

If any one is interested in tracking our progress, you see where we are at http://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/Aloha      We expect to depart from the Las Perlas Islands on 8 January, or slightly thereafter. Also, if anyone is planning a trip to Hawaii, we would love to meet you, and will also be serving as the Ocean Cruising Club Port Captain for Hawaii for the year in the islands prior to moving on to the South Pacific. 

 

Seasons Greetings,

 

Steve and Liz Davis

Aloha SM72

Shelter Bay, Panama


On Dec 24, 2017, at 11:56, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am sure that there is a lot of experience in this Group that the "new-to-Amel" Super Maramus and 54 owners would like to hear regarding onboard fuel. When I was new to this Group, I could not get experienced answers on how much is enough fuel.

 

I bought 10 each 18.9 liter jerry jugs and filled them for each ocean crossing. They added about 300nm to my about 1,000nm range on the Super Maramu (600 liter tank). BTW, the 54 fuel tank is 900 liters and should provide a minimum of 1,300 miles while motoring without carrying extra fuel.

 

My experience around the world is that we never touched the 10 jugs (189 extra liters) and the most that we used on any passage was 400 liters in an isolated case with almost no wind between Panama and the Galapagos. Had we been more experienced, we may have picked a better departure date. During our two 3,000 passages we used about 250 liters each.

 

I hope this helps you make your plans.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Extra fuel

eric freedman
 

I forgot to mention 10 additional trips from to or from the Long Island  to S. America or the  Caribe in my Tartan 37 with 450 liters of fuel on board. The Tartan would go to weather much better than out Amels.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 6:20 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Extra fuel

 

 

We had three occasions when we used more than 600 liters of fuel.

 

One was a big mistake, sailing from Colombia to Guadeloupe. The trade winds were  particularly strong and we has 30 knots average on the nose for 9 days. The Arc world going the other way did it in 4 days.

 

Another was this fall from Long Island non-stop to Martinique, again strong wind on the nose 12 of wind and 2 days of sailing.. I could have stopped in Bermuda, but it seems like when you pull into Bermuda you are stuck there for days.   

 

The other time was when we had to sail to almost 54  degrees West to get around a huge storm on our way to the Caribbean. This is the storm where Triple Stars lost a crew member.

 

We almost used 600 liters a 4th  time when we were in a hurricane for 36 hours. Herb the weather forecaster told us to divert to Bermuda after the Hurricane at maximum speed. There were 2 more storms of 50 knots coming at us. We beat both storms and continued onto the Caribe without stopping in Bermuda, even though we were looking at the spit buoy off of Bermuda when Herb said to keep going.

 

I have made many trips over 2000 miles and a few over 3000 and have never used up the main tank.

This last trip marked our 35th trip either to or from Ny  to the Caribe or S. America

 

From Puerto Mogan, Grand Canaria to Guadeloupe we used 300 liters, from Long island to Santa Marta Colombia we use 250 liters.

Sometimes we have to run the A/C in addition to the Engine when it is terribly hot below,

Also we use the diesel heater when it is very cold, even though it uses a tiny amount of diesel.

 

However in the 78,000 miles we have sailed it was always nice to have the extra fuel.

 

I think of my very good friend Eric Forsyth in his home made 42 foot West Sail 42.

He has logged over 300,000 miles, and CCA blue water  medal recipient.  We communicate often when he is at sea. One year after  enduring a hurricane south of the Falklands, having his boat holed, losing his electronics, and steering, he headed to Cape town. When he fixed the boat he headed to Caribbean to meet for out birthdays. I read his agonizing reports of making 3-15 miles a day for almost 2 weeks while crossing the equator. I am sure  he  would have liked to have more fuel. He was 82 years old at that time.

He just left his boat in Portugal after sailing from Long Island, to come home for Christmas age 85.

 

 

His book is a great one about his 50 years of sailing https://www.amazon.com/Inexplicable-Attraction-Fifty-Years-Sailing/dp/0692839259

It’s a great read. He Is now 85 years old.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 11:57 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

 

 

I am sure that there is a lot of experience in this Group that the "new-to-Amel" Super Maramus and 54 owners would like to hear regarding onboard fuel. When I was new to this Group, I could not get experienced answers on how much is enough fuel.

 

I bought 10 each 18.9 liter jerry jugs and filled them for each ocean crossing. They added about 300nm to my about 1,000nm range on the Super Maramu (600 liter tank). BTW, the 54 fuel tank is 900 liters and should provide a minimum of 1,300 miles while motoring without carrying extra fuel.

 

My experience around the world is that we never touched the 10 jugs (189 extra liters) and the most that we used on any passage was 400 liters in an isolated case with almost no wind between Panama and the Galapagos. Had we been more experienced, we may have picked a better departure date. During our two 3,000 passages we used about 250 liters each.

 

I hope this helps you make your plans.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Extra fuel

eric freedman
 

We had three occasions when we used more than 600 liters of fuel.

 

One was a big mistake, sailing from Colombia to Guadeloupe. The trade winds were  particularly strong and we has 30 knots average on the nose for 9 days. The Arc world going the other way did it in 4 days.

 

Another was this fall from Long Island non-stop to Martinique, again strong wind on the nose 12 of wind and 2 days of sailing.. I could have stopped in Bermuda, but it seems like when you pull into Bermuda you are stuck there for days.   

 

The other time was when we had to sail to almost 54  degrees West to get around a huge storm on our way to the Caribbean. This is the storm where Triple Stars lost a crew member.

 

We almost used 600 liters a 4th  time when we were in a hurricane for 36 hours. Herb the weather forecaster told us to divert to Bermuda after the Hurricane at maximum speed. There were 2 more storms of 50 knots coming at us. We beat both storms and continued onto the Caribe without stopping in Bermuda, even though we were looking at the spit buoy off of Bermuda when Herb said to keep going.

 

I have made many trips over 2000 miles and a few over 3000 and have never used up the main tank.

This last trip marked our 35th trip either to or from Ny  to the Caribe or S. America

 

From Puerto Mogan, Grand Canaria to Guadeloupe we used 300 liters, from Long island to Santa Marta Colombia we use 250 liters.

Sometimes we have to run the A/C in addition to the Engine when it is terribly hot below,

Also we use the diesel heater when it is very cold, even though it uses a tiny amount of diesel.

 

However in the 78,000 miles we have sailed it was always nice to have the extra fuel.

 

I think of my very good friend Eric Forsyth in his home made 42 foot West Sail 42.

He has logged over 300,000 miles, and CCA blue water  medal recipient.  We communicate often when he is at sea. One year after  enduring a hurricane south of the Falklands, having his boat holed, losing his electronics, and steering, he headed to Cape town. When he fixed the boat he headed to Caribbean to meet for out birthdays. I read his agonizing reports of making 3-15 miles a day for almost 2 weeks while crossing the equator. I am sure  he  would have liked to have more fuel. He was 82 years old at that time.

He just left his boat in Portugal after sailing from Long Island, to come home for Christmas age 85.

 

 

His book is a great one about his 50 years of sailing https://www.amazon.com/Inexplicable-Attraction-Fifty-Years-Sailing/dp/0692839259

It’s a great read. He Is now 85 years old.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 11:57 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

 

 

I am sure that there is a lot of experience in this Group that the "new-to-Amel" Super Maramus and 54 owners would like to hear regarding onboard fuel. When I was new to this Group, I could not get experienced answers on how much is enough fuel.

 

I bought 10 each 18.9 liter jerry jugs and filled them for each ocean crossing. They added about 300nm to my about 1,000nm range on the Super Maramu (600 liter tank). BTW, the 54 fuel tank is 900 liters and should provide a minimum of 1,300 miles while motoring without carrying extra fuel.

 

My experience around the world is that we never touched the 10 jugs (189 extra liters) and the most that we used on any passage was 400 liters in an isolated case with almost no wind between Panama and the Galapagos. Had we been more experienced, we may have picked a better departure date. During our two 3,000 passages we used about 250 liters each.

 

I hope this helps you make your plans.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

James Cromie
 

I am grateful for all of the sage advice from the community of experienced sailors on this forum.  
Thank you all for your input.  
Happy Holidays to everyone.  
James
SM347

On Dec 24, 2017, at 11:56 AM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am sure that there is a lot of experience in this Group that the "new-to-Amel" Super Maramus and 54 owners would like to hear regarding onboard fuel. When I was new to this Group, I could not get experienced answers on how much is enough fuel.

I bought 10 each 18.9 liter jerry jugs and filled them for each ocean crossing. They added about 300nm to my about 1,000nm range on the Super Maramu (600 liter tank). BTW, the 54 fuel tank is 900 liters and should provide a minimum of 1,300 miles while motoring without carrying extra fuel.

My experience around the world is that we never touched the 10 jugs (189 extra liters) and the most that we used on any passage was 400 liters in an isolated case with almost no wind between Panama and the Galapagos. Had we been more experienced, we may have picked a better departure date. During our two 3,000 passages we used about 250 liters each.

I hope this helps you make your plans.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



Steering greasing points on maramu

smiles bernard
 

Hello there fellow Maramu fans

Behind my steering wheel looks like the attached photo
There is a grease point on the upper alu section in the middle of the photo. There is another on the lower alu section but on the reverse/ hidden face
Does anyone know if this greases the cable or some sort of rack and pinion that then attaches to the cable ?

Many thanks in advance and have a very merry Christmas

Miles


Procedure for setting spinnaker pole

smiles bernard
 

Hello there
I’d be really great full if anyone could explain the spinnaker pole setup procedure on a maramu.
The previous owner mentioned it briefly but is was amongst a great deal of other info so has evaporated somewhat.
Merry Christmas!
Miles


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

Stephen Davis
 

It seems their is no correct answer to how much fuel to carry. Like many here have voiced, I hate to motor and love to sail. With that said, every passage has its own challenges, and most of us would rather be prepared for any eventuality. The one thing I’m not prepared to do is roll around for weeks in the ITCZ while waiting for wind, as I’d prefer to quickly get to the wind, and then enjoy a great sail to our destination. 

We will be departing Panama in a couple of weeks, and embarking on a nearly 5000 nm journey to Hawaii. We tried to find a longer distance between 2 points of land, but this was the best we could do for now. If you have never looked at this route, it poses some unique problems in the first 1500+ miles. You have to deal with the ITCZ and some other phenomena which can create a huge area of little or no wind before you get to the area of NE trades which will carry you swiftly to Hawaii. I’ve  spoke to one sailor who took 48 days enroute on his Hans Christian 43. We hope to make the trip in 28 to 30 days with our swift SM, and some extra fuel in case I can’t find a way to keep us in some wind early on. In our case we will use a 37 gallon Nauta bladder secured just behind the fuel cap on the aft deck, and 5 twenty liter jerry cans in the life raft locker.  We have a valise life raft which lives on the floor at the nav station when on passage. 

We have never carried extra diesel on any passage prior to this, but it seemed  smart this time, and we are happy with the choice. Happy to hear what the rest of you think. Should we take less or more extra diesel?  How about you Bill K...would you take any extra?

If any one is interested in tracking our progress, you see where we are at http://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/Aloha      We expect to depart from the Las Perlas Islands on 8 January, or slightly thereafter. Also, if anyone is planning a trip to Hawaii, we would love to meet you, and will also be serving as the Ocean Cruising Club Port Captain for Hawaii for the year in the islands prior to moving on to the South Pacific. 

Seasons Greetings,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM72
Shelter Bay, Panama

On Dec 24, 2017, at 11:56, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am sure that there is a lot of experience in this Group that the "new-to-Amel" Super Maramus and 54 owners would like to hear regarding onboard fuel. When I was new to this Group, I could not get experienced answers on how much is enough fuel.

I bought 10 each 18.9 liter jerry jugs and filled them for each ocean crossing. They added about 300nm to my about 1,000nm range on the Super Maramu (600 liter tank). BTW, the 54 fuel tank is 900 liters and should provide a minimum of 1,300 miles while motoring without carrying extra fuel.

My experience around the world is that we never touched the 10 jugs (189 extra liters) and the most that we used on any passage was 400 liters in an isolated case with almost no wind between Panama and the Galapagos. Had we been more experienced, we may have picked a better departure date. During our two 3,000 passages we used about 250 liters each.

I hope this helps you make your plans.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

I am sure that there is a lot of experience in this Group that the "new-to-Amel" Super Maramus and 54 owners would like to hear regarding onboard fuel. When I was new to this Group, I could not get experienced answers on how much is enough fuel.

I bought 10 each 18.9 liter jerry jugs and filled them for each ocean crossing. They added about 300nm to my about 1,000nm range on the Super Maramu (600 liter tank). BTW, the 54 fuel tank is 900 liters and should provide a minimum of 1,300 miles while motoring without carrying extra fuel.

My experience around the world is that we never touched the 10 jugs (189 extra liters) and the most that we used on any passage was 400 liters in an isolated case with almost no wind between Panama and the Galapagos. Had we been more experienced, we may have picked a better departure date. During our two 3,000 passages we used about 250 liters each.

I hope this helps you make your plans.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

Porter McRoberts
 

Courtney. 
You have a serious range on the fuel you natively carry. 
Porter. 

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Dec 23, 2017, at 9:59 PM, itsfun1 Itsfun1@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I for one am forced to sail on a schedule.   I will not leave unless the window is big enough but, I willing to burn a lot of fuel if necessary. I love to sail and prefer NOT to burn any fuel except for the generator BUT when I have to get back to work so I can afford to sail I get back to work. 
I love the Idea of extra fuel but for now will follow Joel's orders and not change my Boat for a full year. 
By the way I love all the discussion in this group it is a safe place to say what you feel 
Thanks for that!
Cheers and Merry Christmas 
Courtney 
Trippin'



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 12/23/17 7:25 PM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

 

Eric,


It's not a question of "wussiness", or "correctness" or any other kind of value judgement.  It's just that different people use their boats differently.  If everybody used their boat in exactly the same way, then we'd all have exactly the same boat, and wouldn't that be a boring world?

We have certainly found ourselves in situations where we NEEDED to be [someplace@sometime] and the engine was required to get there.  We try (and usually manage) to avoid such situations. Other people do not have that luxury/desire and there is no reason they should feel I think I am superior to them because of it.

I try really hard (but don't always succeed) to incorporate my rational for a recommendation so people can evaluate if it applies to their personnel situation. Unless I feel really strongly about a sa fety matter, I always try to say "I would..." and avoid "You should...". 


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


Weigh carrying capacity of SM

karkauai
 

Hi all.
We are going to carry supplies to Caribbean from Ft Lauderdale to hurricane stricken islands this winter. I'm wondering how much weight I can take on safely. Loaded with all our supplies and provisions, Kristy sits about 1 1/2 inches above the original waterline in the stern, and 4 inches above waterline at the bow.

Can I load her to that waterline? If I go above it, the engine and generator exhausts will be below the water. That doesn't seem like a good idea. If that is ok, what other considerations are important if I load her another inch or more above the waterline?

I was going to carry one pallet (40" x 40" x48") on the foreword cabintop and another one or two broken down below decks as carrying capacity allows. I don't know the weight of the pallets yet.

Any thoughts?

Thanks andMerry Christmas!
Kent
SM 243
Kristy


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

Courtney Gorman
 

I for one am forced to sail on a schedule.   I will not leave unless the window is big enough but, I willing to burn a lot of fuel if necessary. I love to sail and prefer NOT to burn any fuel except for the generator BUT when I have to get back to work so I can afford to sail I get back to work. 
I love the Idea of extra fuel but for now will follow Joel's orders and not change my Boat for a full year. 
By the way I love all the discussion in this group it is a safe place to say what you feel 
Thanks for that!
Cheers and Merry Christmas 
Courtney 
Trippin'



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 12/23/17 7:25 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

 

Eric,


It's not a question of "wussiness", or "correctness" or any other kind of value judgement.  It's just that different people use their boats differently.  If everybody used their boat in exactly the same way, then we'd all have exactly the same boat, and wouldn't that be a boring world?

We have certainly found ourselves in situations where we NEEDED to be [someplace@sometime] and the engine was required to get there.  We try (and usually manage) to avoid such situations. Other people do not have that luxury/desire and there is no reason they should feel I think I am superior to them because of it.

I try really hard (but don't always succeed) to incorporate my rational for a recommendation so people can evaluate if it applies to their personnel situation. Unless I feel really strongly about a sa fety matter, I always try to say "I would..." and avoid "You should...". 


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

James Alton
 

Bill,

  Well put!  I admire your desire to sail as much as possible with your boat.   Happy Holidays to you and the other Amel owners!

Best,

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Dec 23, 2017, at 8:25 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Eric,


It's not a question of "wussiness", or "correctness" or any other kind of value judgement.  It's just that different people use their boats differently.  If everybody used their boat in exactly the same way, then we'd all have exactly the same boat, and wouldn't that be a boring world?

We have certainly found ourselves in situations where we NEEDED to be [someplace@sometime] and the engine was required to get there.  We try (and usually manage) to avoid such situations. Other people do not have that luxury/desire and there is no reason they should feel I think I am superior to them because of it.

I try really hard (but don't always succeed) to incorporate my rational for a recommendation so people can evaluate if it applies to their personnel situation. Unless I feel really strongly about a sa fety matter, I always try to say "I would..." and avoid "You should...". 


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL



Re: Nauta tank installation.

greatketch@...
 

Eric,

It's not a question of "wussiness", or "correctness" or any other kind of value judgement.  It's just that different people use their boats differently.  If everybody used their boat in exactly the same way, then we'd all have exactly the same boat, and wouldn't that be a boring world?

We have certainly found ourselves in situations where we NEEDED to be [someplace@sometime] and the engine was required to get there.  We try (and usually manage) to avoid such situations. Other people do not have that luxury/desire and there is no reason they should feel I think I am superior to them because of it.

I try really hard (but don't always succeed) to incorporate my rational for a recommendation so people can evaluate if it applies to their personnel situation. Unless I feel really strongly about a safety matter, I always try to say "I would..." and avoid "You should...". 


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nauta tank installation.

eric freedman
 

James,

On my Tartan 37 years ago, I  literally motored from Bermuda to Long Island. Even with a code 0 sail there was absolutely no wind to sail.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, December 23, 2017 8:40 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nauta tank installation.

 

 

EriC- I think others would agree that you are NOT a wuss!...

Thanks for the detail on this. I’m thinking of having a spare Nauta tank for the passage north to New England. 

 

James


On Dec 23, 2017, at 1:25 AM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Our Nauta Tank installation(s)

I have 6 pad eyes through bolted into my port locker for a 50+ gallon Nauta tank. With the corners  attached  to the pad eyes with carabineers and with the 2 strap also attached, the tank is very solid when full.

The tank runs from the outboard side of the port locker to the inboard side of the port locker-Just Fits.

Across the middle of the port locker is a board and the tank sits against that board.

 

 

There are 2 versions of the tank. I bought the one with the fitting attached.. It is also coated with  nylon like a good wetsuit and is not prone to abrasion. Over the last 15 years I have tried many ways to fill the tank.

 

The solution if found  is to use just one 5/8 inch hose hooked to the tank then to  a Jabsco vane puppy pump then another hose that is long and runs from the pump  to the fuel fill. In the middle I wired a 2 way DPDT switch for in and out of the fuel.

When I  had Kimberlite built they installed a 24 volt watertight outlet to the left side of the vertical control of the bow thruster.

 

To fill the tank we use a 6 gallon bucket that we have on board. We  fill it continuously filling the bucket and running the pump. When the tank is about ¾ full we “ burp the tank” . I reverse the pump and someone vigorously steps on the tank numerous times. It is amazing how much air comes out into the ½ full bucket.. We do this twice more while we fill the tank until the tank looks pregnant with no air inside and 50+ gallons inside.

 

The fuel does not slosh around as there is no air and no space for the fuel to slosh.

 

When we need the entire contents of the tank, we reverse the pump and drain it completely, We then remove that tank and lift it up centering the drain above the rest of the tank and drain the last drop of fuel. The tank then looks like it is vacuum sealed.

We then fold it up , put it in a strong bag and put in the locker.

 

We made 2 very long nonstop trips , so I added another Nauta tank.

We lashed and tied it to the aft cabin top and filled it the same way. Needless to say

We really tied it down to the grab rails and mizzen mast. We also cable tied the straps so they would not loosen. It did not move an inch.

The first fuel we used was from that tank.

 

In both cases we came in with a full main tank and some fuel in the aluminum life raft locker tanks.

It is nice to have 330 gallons of fuel on board.

With just the Nauta tank in the port locker we were 2 degrees to port.

 

Ok I’m a wuss.  Unfortunately some of my crew have plane reservation and work so we are sometimes forced to motor.

I hate it but it is necessary.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2017 6:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

 

James,

 

I used a Nauta flexible tank, not for fuel but as a holding tank on my old boat.  

 

Properly installed and protected from chafe they work great.  It can be tough securing them properly, and because they are flexible, it is impossible to stop the liquid contents from sloshing, so you need to be sure you don't make them so big, or put them in a such a place, that they can have an adverse effect on the stability of the boat.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Key West, Florida.



---In amelyachtowners@..., <jamescromie@...> wrote :

Has anyone used the collapsible auxiliary fuel containers that are available?  They seem like a nice option for economizing in space when not needed.. 

 

James

sm 347