Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Drawer/cupboard pulls

Patrick McAneny
 

Kent, Would these handles come with the mechanism , I assume not. I need to replace the plastic part or find the little springs . 
Thanks,
Pat
SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Fri, Aug 10, 2018 7:47 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Drawer/cupboard pulls

 
I’ve added you to the order for 10 Paul.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Aug 9, 2018, at 6:37 PM, osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
We can taken10 as well, sooner or later they will brake and then good to have a few spare. Assume we prefer aluminum but not essential
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259


Re: SM Running Rigging

Alan Leslie
 

12 mm kevlar is it....
sans acune doubt
Thanks Bill for the confirmation
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
Port Vila, Vanuatu



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Drawer/cupboard pulls

karkauai
 

Do you still want 10 in the black ABS, Philipp?

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy


On Aug 8, 2018, at 2:52 PM, philipp.sollberger@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Mark,

Hi Mark,

I would like to reserve 
6 handles in alluminium with the plastic black push button inclusive the mechanic plastic box in the back.

Philipp

SV Félicie, Switzerland
SM#124


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Drawer/cupboard pulls

karkauai
 

I’ve added you to the order for 10 Paul.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Aug 9, 2018, at 6:37 PM, osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

We can taken10 as well, sooner or later they will brake and then good to have a few spare. Assume we prefer aluminum but not essential
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Drawer/cupboard pulls

karkauai
 

I will contact Maud.

Kent “

On Aug 8, 2018, at 12:25 PM, john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I would be in for ten of the aluminium as well.  I am open to whatever option has the majority.  I will say that at least on Annie we have a few drawers that are loaded heavily; the aluminium handles would probably be better suited for those spots.  Probably also the frequent use placed like the galley would benefit from the aluminium.


Has anyone contacted Maud to see if Amel would be willing to purchase enough to push the order above 100?

              John

SV Annie SM 37
Le Marin MQ
 


Re: Drawer/cupboard pulls

Craig Briggs
 

John,
This thread started with my asking Maud for the handles. She said they are no longer available and that she would not be willing to tell me who the original supplier was so that I could contact them directly. Kent has graciously stepped in with the 3D printing option for us.
Cheers, Craig


Re: Drawer/cupboard pulls

danb.taylor@...
 

We would be interested in 10 aluminum.

Dan
SM116


Re: SM Running Rigging

greatketch@...
 

Miles,

For any of the main outhaul, traveler or jib car control lines Kevlar, Spectra or Vectran core line is essential. Stretch is the enemy of performance in this application.

I tried 10mm OD Kelvar core line and found it insufficient for the use on the Andersen line tender drum. It consistently slipped under load. 12mm kevlar core works fine.  It doesn't surprise me since Andersen specifies that these drums are to be used only with 12 mm line.

I can only say what I found on my boat.  If 10mm OD Kevlar core line works for you, or has some advantages over the larger line that I do not understand, then do not let me talk you out of it. It is entirely possible that I missed some vital setup detail that would have made 10mm line work. 

I adjust the position of the traveler and outhaul quite a bit when sailing.  Having the control line slip when trying to pull the traveler to windward is a real pain in the neck.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA



Re: SM Running Rigging

Alan Leslie
 

When I first bought Elyse I had real issues with the outhaul line...
The previous owner had 10mm polyester installed.
I changed it to 12mm polyester as per Andersen recommendations.
That was marginally better but still slipped.
Then I changed it to 12mm Kevlar and it hasn't slipped since.

Whether 10mm Kevlar would work as well I don't know.
But as far as I am concerned 12mm Kevlar is the answer ... and it has to be TIGHT !

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 Port Vila
  


Re: SM Running Rigging

Miles
 

Hi Bill,

 

One difference that may explain the difference is that Amel uses Kevlar line.  I think that it does not compress as much and that may be why it works well.

 

Regards,

 

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm216 , 50 miles off Cape Ann, Mass, heading north.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Drawer/cupboard pulls

Stephen Davis
 

I’m still in for 20 whether it be black ABS or aluminum. 

Steve
Aloha SM 72
Hawaii

On Aug 8, 2018, at 06:25, john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I would be in for ten of the aluminium as well.  I am open to whatever option has the majority.  I will say that at least on Annie we have a few drawers that are loaded heavily; the aluminium handles would probably be better suited for those spots.  Probably also the frequent use placed like the galley would benefit from the aluminium.


Has anyone contacted Maud to see if Amel would be willing to purchase enough to push the order above 100?

              John

SV Annie SM 37
Le Marin MQ
 


Re: Drawer/cupboard pulls

Paul Osterberg
 

We can taken10 as well, sooner or later they will brake and then good to have a few spare. Assume we prefer aluminum but not essential
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass SM 2000

Alin SM 283
 

Thank you Eric.  
Regards
Alin


On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 at 15:12, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]
wrote:
 

Mine is a lofrans tigress.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 10:50 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass SM 2000

 

 

Hello to all Amel owners. 

I own a SM 2000, Wanderer hull number 283, launched in 2000.

Can someone give me  information about the windlass?, type, size etc
My boat is through the process of being put into charter and my surveyor wants to know this.... Thank you. All the best .


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] changing cockpit cover installation from old Super Maramu to SM2K

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Kent,

that will be great. see you down here some time

Kind Regards

Danny

On 10 August 2018 at 00:25 "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

We’re heading S this Fall, thru the Canal in early Spring.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243



 

 

Sounds great Kent. You must be getting close to your Pacific adventure. You are going to be blown away (as in the mind, not the boat) when you experience the variety of the Pacific islands.

Cheers

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl


 

 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] re caulking of stanchion base

James Alton
 

Craig,

   The tool that I own is the Fluxeon 1800 watt model.  You should be able to view it here:  https://fluxeon.com/products/

   You can use a lot of different types of coils with this type unit, which can be bought or custom made.  The one I use the most is connected to the Fluxeon by two heavy cables about 3’ long so the coil is on the end of the cables making it access pretty easy.  The coil on my machine is custom in that it has been tuned to work with bronze but it will also heat stainless, steel etc. though perhaps not as efficiently.  The coil is water cooled so it runs completely cool as long as the water is flowing.  While the field is the most powerful if the metal to be heated is placed in the center of a coil the field generated extends out from the coil, not sure of just how far but I could heat a 1/4” bolt to cherry red in perhaps 10 seconds at high power with the coil perhaps 1/2" away from the bolt.   The bronze 2 1/2” #16 wood screws I removed were countersunk into the hull about 1/2” and could be steaming/smoking in about 12 seconds.  The best part was that the field must travel down the bolt since the 2 1/2” screw was heated all of the way to the very end.  Bronze and stainless are not great conductors so it is hard otherwise to heat the fastener down it’s length.  The field penetrates things like fibreglass without heating them but will heat any metals within a short distance from the coil so you need to be aware of what is inside the area you are heating.  I think that there could be some concerns about inducing a current into electrical wiring and perhaps damaging sensitive devices, perhaps one of the electrical experts could verify this.  I have not had any problems to date.

   I am located mid coast Florida when I am not in Nova Scotia.  Let me know if you would be in either area.  The complete unit with the water cooling would be too much to ship around I think.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220 


On Aug 9, 2018, at 12:55 PM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

James,

Very cool tool (or hot as the case may be). The video at showed it being used on nuts and stuff that stick out so the tool could enclose it for induction heating.  How did you use it on flat head wood screws that are flush with the hull/deck?  

Also, it's a very expensive tool - is your's for rent (cheap)? :-)

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Mark,

   I had the same results in my search for data as well.  I am thinking that if both the Phillips and the slotted are able to provide enough torque to shear of the bolt that it doesn’t matter too much about which design can provide the most torque.  I think that in the case of installing fasteners in an application where they are likely to seize at some point that using a drive that will allow the application of enough torque to match the strength of the fastener to be something to consider.  Clamping a specimen into a vice and attempting to twist off the head might be one way to conduct this test.  

  It sounds like you know how to deal with stubborn fasteners in steel.  Heat is an invaluable tool in fastener removal in my experience and fortunately there is a cool (no pun intended) way to utilize heat to remove fasteners from fibreglass and wood without damage.  The tool uses inductive heating which creates eddy currents when in close proximity to metals, especially ferrous ones though you can tune it to work well on non ferrous.  To give you some idea of the potential, I was in a real pickle on a huge refastening job which required removal and replacement of more than 6000 #16 x 2 1/2” bronze slotted wood screws.  Initial testing revealed that 50% of the fasteners were breaking off right at the planking to frame interface or the heads were splitting when the torque was applied.  It is a really bad thing to just drill new holes in a wooden boat structurally so I got a really expensive induction tool that allowed me to remove (amazing to me) 100% of the remaining fastenings with no breakages saving the customer a ton of money and new #18 bronze screws went right into the old holes.  The heating tool does not directly affect wood or fibreglass for that matter but the metal can be heated to any temperature you want including glowing bright orange which is not a good idea for a fastener embedded in wood or fibreglass. (grin)  The unit I have allows you to dial down or up the power to exactly what you need and because the field reaches in a ways, the fastener gets heated for it’s whole length in a matter of seconds.  Most marine caulks and resins soften with the application of heat and I have had great luck removing stubborn fasteners using this method.  I am hoping it will work as well on the stuck screws that I expect to find in my stanchions etc.   Here is one example of the induction heating tool  Mine is a bit more advanced but works on the same principles.  https://boltbusterinc.com/kit/

  Thanks for the suggestion on the impact driver.

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Drawer/cupboard pulls

karkauai
 

Will do Craig,
Thanks
Kent

Hi Kent,
You can kick my order up to 10 if it helps get to the minimum of 100 total.
Craig


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Guidance on replacing Engine tray mounts

karkauai
 

James, you may have already posted this, but what Amel model and number, and what engine do you have?

Are you repowering or just replacing the mounts?

The original mounts in my SM 243 for Volvo TMD22 were Vetus mounts rated for much lighter engines than the TMD22.  I understand this was done to lessen noise, and that because of the CDrive setup the forces on the mounts were less than in conventional drives.  If you are just replacing mounts, I would use the identical type as the ones you are replacing.  If you are repowering, I would use the mounts recommended by the new engine manufacturer to be sure the warranty is valid.

If you are replacing with identical mounts, only minor adjustments will be needed.  Using the solid disc I spoke of in my previous answer, you can get the tolerances very close.  Then replacing the disc with the flexible coupling should leave you well aligned.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243


Hi Stephen

Yes, I agree on the seriousness of the alignment.. Olivier described to me the process for alignment, but if you've got something written I appreciate that.. I listened carefully, but didn't take any notes..

My first step is to find someone who has ideally done this job before.. Worst case, I'll find a good mechanic and we can figure it out together.. 

Are these mounts the Vetus type? 

I think I found what looks to be correct.. But if you can confirm?

Thanks again..
JAMES



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: paying Amel for parts order

Craig Briggs
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: re caulking of stanchion base

Craig Briggs
 

James,
Very cool tool (or hot as the case may be). The video at showed it being used on nuts and stuff that stick out so the tool could enclose it for induction heating.  How did you use it on flat head wood screws that are flush with the hull/deck?  

Also, it's a very expensive tool - is your's for rent (cheap)? :-)

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Mark,

   I had the same results in my search for data as well.  I am thinking that if both the Phillips and the slotted are able to provide enough torque to shear of the bolt that it doesn’t matter too much about which design can provide the most torque.  I think that in the case of installing fasteners in an application where they are likely to seize at some point that using a drive that will allow the application of enough torque to match the strength of the fastener to be something to consider.  Clamping a specimen into a vice and attempting to twist off the head might be one way to conduct this test.  

  It sounds like you know how to deal with stubborn fasteners in steel.  Heat is an invaluable tool in fastener removal in my experience and fortunately there is a cool (no pun intended) way to utilize heat to remove fasteners from fibreglass and wood without damage.  The tool uses inductive heating which creates eddy currents when in close proximity to metals, especially ferrous ones though you can tune it to work well on non ferrous.  To give you some idea of the potential, I was in a real pickle on a huge refastening job which required removal and replacement of more than 6000 #16 x 2 1/2” bronze slotted wood screws.  Initial testing revealed that 50% of the fasteners were breaking off right at the planking to frame interface or the heads were splitting when the torque was applied.  It is a really bad thing to just drill new holes in a wooden boat structurally so I got a really expensive induction tool that allowed me to remove (amazing to me) 100% of the remaining fastenings with no breakages saving the customer a ton of money and new #18 bronze screws went right into the old holes.  The heating tool does not directly affect wood or fibreglass for that matter but the metal can be heated to any temperature you want including glowing bright orange which is not a good idea for a fastener embedded in wood or fibreglass. (grin)  The unit I have allows you to dial down or up the power to exactly what you need and because the field reaches in a ways, the fastener gets heated for it’s whole length in a matter of seconds.  Most marine caulks and resins soften with the application of heat and I have had great luck removing stubborn fasteners using this method.  I am hoping it will work as well on the stuck screws that I expect to find in my stanchions etc.   Here is one example of the induction heating tool  Mine is a bit more advanced but works on the same principles.  https://boltbusterinc.com/kit/

  Thanks for the suggestion on the impact driver.

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Drawer/cupboard pulls [1 Attachment]

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Kent,

My vote is for the black plastic.  I plan to paint it with Krylon Chrome paint - I've used it before and it give a very good result.  As I said on earlier post, at 6 knots on a dark night you can't tell the difference.  

Also, if you need more quantity to get the price break, I'll go to 10.

Cheers, Craig SN68

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