Date   

Re: Curaçao Customs

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Mark,

We live on Curacao.
Potentially you will have some problems here. This Island is not known for it's flawless organization. Although you are able to get your parts "tax-free" on your boat the route you've chosen is, depending on the parts you carry, not great. The way this normally works is that you get the parts via one of the boat-shops on the Island. They know how to process this.
When you land on Curacao you may get inspected and charged with import duty and sales tax. It depends on the parts and, in honesty, the mood of the guys at the customs-line. Sometimes they are not even there. But most of the times you will be required to put your bags through an X-ray machine. They are specifically interested in electronics as most people that come in from the US are buying all kinds of that stuff abroad.
I guess you can get the money back afterwards if they do charge you but I'm pretty sure that the road for this will be (very) long.
So it does depend on the parts you are bringing.
Let me know if you need more info.

Kind regards,

Arno Luijten


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Curaçao Customs

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good morning Mark,
Have you look at noon site:
http://www.noonsite.com/Countries/Curacao?rc=Formalities#Clearance

Sincerely, Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 6/19/18, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@gmail.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Curaçao Customs
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, June 19, 2018, 9:16 PM


 

















We are flying into
Curaçao with a few parts for the boat.
The boat is already there (placed in bond) as we left it on
the hard for our
trip. Does anyone know the formalities for customs as we are
considered a
vessel in transit? We will be leaving Curaçao within a few
days once the boat
is launched. I can’t seem to find any info through regular
channels. Has
anyone anything to offer?

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream
Puff - SM2K - #275

www.creampuff.us


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Alternator and Masse leak detector

Alan Leslie
 

Hi  Nick,

Agree you found the "fault". 
It is the alternator.
BUT I very much doubt that it is a diode "leaking" to the frame.
It's more likely to be a breakdown in the insulation somewhere...it could even be something as simple as salt crystals around the negative terminal providing a circuit from  -ve to the alternator case.

Good luck
Alan
Elyse SM437


Curaçao Customs

Mark Erdos
 

We are flying into Curaçao with a few parts for the boat. The boat is already there (placed in bond) as we left it on the hard for our trip. Does anyone know the formalities for customs as we are considered a vessel in transit? We will be leaving Curaçao within a few days once the boat is launched. I can’t seem to find any info through regular channels. Has anyone anything to offer?

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

www.creampuff.us

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Alternator and Masse leak detector

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Bill,

As I understand it, the Isolated ground system on an Amel is no different to other yachts with Isolated ground systems, and is quite simple namely that the negative of the DC system (and indeed the AC system) is not connected to the rest of the equipment in the boat. So every piece of 24v equipment is connected to the battery bank with a +ve and negative wire via the switch panel and or busbars or indeed directly to the batteries. The battery bank negative is not connected to the engine block or anodes. Then all the equipment and metal on the boat is linked together and earthed to the sea independent of the battery bank.

With this system the alternator for example has to be an isolated ground alternator. That is the -ve terminal is not electrically connected to the alternator frame as on some alternators. So there are two terminals on the back of the alternator, one +ve and one -ve and there is no electrical contact between them and the alternator frame.

If the +ve or the -ve on the battery system is connected to the ground system a fault light appears on the “Masse” detector.

If any sensor or piece of equipment on the engine is not isolated ground rated then its -ve will make an electrical contact with the bonding system.

It is, to my eye, likely that the 24v charging alternator has a fault such that the negative terminal is leaking to the frame of the alternator and thus to the engine itself which is connected to the bonded system and to the sea. By disconnecting the 24v negative cable from the faulty alternator there is no longer a contact between negative 24v and the bonding system, which is why the fault light goes off then.  Thus we have found the fault.

Furthermore I suspect that within the faulty 24v alternator we will discover that it is one of the diodes within the rectifier that is leaking to the frame, but that remains to be seen.

Kind regards

Nick

On 19 Jun 2018, at 19:20, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Nick,

I am sending you an Off-Group, direct email.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970






On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 1:00 PM Nick Newington ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Bill,


I am the second owner.

The engine is original. I purchased the boat in June 2017,  it had been ashore in Grenada for three years as the then owner was very ill and unable to use the boat.

The only thing that was changed on the engine in my ownership has been the turbo boost pressure sensor. This was a five minute job to remove the old sensor and replace with new sensor. Done by Volvo agent in Martinique.

In the year I have owned the boat I have had no zinc sacrifice beyond normal, there was until recently no fault on the indicator including just after the turbo boost  sensor was replaced. So this fault is new.

I already have a propeller zinc.

Is there a way in which I can test if the Isolated ground has been defeated?

Nick
On 19 Jun 2018, at 16:07, Bill Rouse brouse@...[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Nick,

Your problem may be an indication of something much more serious.

How long have you owned this Amel 54? Has there been an engine change, or any sensors changed?

When Amel installed the Volvo D3-110, it had been modified to be Isolated Ground by Volvo France. If you ask any Volvo dealer to check the serial number for such a modification, it will not show up on Volvos database. In fact, it is difficult to find any Volvo record of this modification which occurred with 100% of all D3s installed when the 54 was built by Amel. 

I believe that your Isolated Ground has been defeated because of either:
  1. Engine change
  2. Non-Isolated Ground sensors or switches installed replacing original ones
  3. Some other modification made by some "expert" which has defeated the Non-Isolated Ground
Yes, if any of the above are true, when you disconnect the 24VDC Negative from the 24VDC Alternator, you will remove the fault indicated on the Bonding test circuit..

I consider this issue serious and you should seek expert help.. A defeated Isolated Ground has been the cause of ruined C-Drives and other serious issues. Until you have this resolved, you should add a propeller zinc, although that will not completely protect things.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970






On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 5:23 AM Nick Newington ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Alan,


I have had an electrician check the boat for me and I asked him to look into the -ve leak and to then try some diagnosis..

This is his reply  "I checked the leak controller, it shows a leak in negativ. I tried several things like bilge pump but nothing changed. When I dismantled the negativ from the 24 V alternator, the leak light went off. So, the problem might be the alternator or somewhere at the engine.”

So I reckon that this would suggest a fault on the 24v alternator or some kind of leak to the bonding system from the engine.

Nick


On 19 Jun 2018, at 02:18, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi Nick,


We have a NEXT STEP-2 reg ...there is a file in the Files section showing how I did it

The reg in the Leece  Neville alt is not designed to charge deep cycle batteries.
Keeping the voltage always at 28.8V will eventually kill your AGM batteries. They need a bulk, absorption, float regimen if they are to be cared for properly.

We have 
600W solar panels and  a Victron MPPT controller
Leece Neville 175A engine alt with Next Step-2 reg
Victron Skyalla 100A charger
Promariner 30A charger

and they are all set to the same absorption and float voltages.


Diodes fail open, I don't think that can be the cause of your problem.

Somewhere on some device that has both 24VDC feed AND a connection to the bonding system, there is a connection between -ve and the bonding connection...and it may not be a metal to metal contact , frequently it is through the sea water. 

Good Luck
Alan
Elyse SM437  Yasawa-i-rara










Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Boots for spreaders

James Alton
 

I think that most of the wear on a Genoa from the spreader tips occurs when the winds are light and there is a beam sea running making the boat roll.  Under those conditions the Genoa can rub the spreader tip even with the sheet well eased.  Patches on the Genoa certainly help but a well rounded roller on the spreader tip I think helps even more.  

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Jun 19, 2018 5:34 PM, "arthur saftlas art@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

A properly trimmed genoa should not touch a spreader.


"The cure for anything is salt water; sweat, tears, or the sea." - Karen Blixen





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Boots for spreaders

Patrick McAneny
 

Just want to correct myself ,I originally addressed the last post to Karen and meant to change that to Arthur ,realizing that was a quote . Arthur in the future sign your post and identify the Amel you own ,assuming you are an owner.
Thank You,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: arthur saftlas art@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 6:01 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Boots for spreaders

 
A properly trimmed genoa should not touch a spreader.

"The cure for anything is salt water; sweat, tears, or the sea." - Karen Blixen




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Boots for spreaders

Patrick McAneny
 

Karen, When you tack, temporary luff for any reason ,or get back winded ( which probably has never happened to you) the sail can and does contact the spreader and over time chafes. If you don't mind, I would like to take some preventative measures. I have a friend with cancer , I will tell him to try salt water ,sweat and tears. Thanks for the tip.
Pat
SM Shenanigan


-----Original Message-----
From: arthur saftlas art@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 6:01 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Boots for spreaders

 
A properly trimmed genoa should not touch a spreader.

"The cure for anything is salt water; sweat, tears, or the sea." - Karen Blixen




Re: Boots for spreaders

greatketch@...
 

Even the best trimmed genoa has to rub across the spreader tip on every tack.  

Even the most carefully trimmed genoa will touch the spreader when the wind dies and the stretch relaxes in the sail and sheets. Granted, the trimmer should fix that ASAP, but on a cruising boat that might take some time to notice and adjust.  At night it might not be noticed for hours.

I agree, it should never be trimmed to touch, but expecting even the most attentively trimmed genoa to never make contact with a spreader tip is unrealistic.

My boat has the plastic "wheels" on the shrouds to help the sail move easily by when tacking.  They work, and they leave the actual spreader tip and shrouds easily visible for inspection.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA

---In amelyachtowners@..., <art@...> wrote :

A properly trimmed genoa should not touch a spreader.

"The cure for anything is salt water; sweat, tears, or the sea." - Karen Blixen




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: IMPORTANT - Dessalator JIC Flare fittings on High Pressure Hoses + More

 

Craig,

I cannot guarantee that anyone, anywhere is correct, rather all I can do is ask the questions of Dessalator, the OEM watermaker supplier to Amel, verify what Dessalator said, and verify what Dessalator meant.

When I asked the question, Dessalator told me “It is essential to reassemble the high pressure hose with Loctite 542 on the conical part.” I wasn't satisfied with that answer because of language issues with technical questions/answers. So I made 3 graphics of 542 on different parts of the JIC male end. After two-back-and-forths with Dessalator marking up my graphics, it was perfectly clear that by conical they meant the 37 degree flare portions and NOTHING on the threads. I also sent them a photo of a bottle of 542 to ensure that we were talking about the same Loctite product. They verified that. Then I produced the graphic shown here for the Amel School Clients. I reworded what Dessalator originally said to read,  “It is essential to reassemble the high pressure hose with Loctite 542 on the flare part only...not the threads.”

Then I posted a revised Membrane Replacement Procedure for my Clients.

At that point, I thought that this is important and maybe some other owners in the Amel Yacht Owners group would want the same information.

Note, at no time did I take the "easy way" out by GOOGLING for the answer.

I am sorry that what I did was not considered valuable by you, but maybe someone else needed it. And maybe someone could argue that there is a better and different way to handle this JIC flare joint...all possible. BUT, what I posted is what the OEM Supplier to Amel said and meant.



Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970






On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 4:05 PM sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Oh Bill, puleeze - nobody's arguing. Not worth getting your pants in a bunch. The Dessalator guy just had the wrong Loctite number. I'm sure you accurately reported the (incorrect) info he gave you.  Not a biggie - we still love you!


So bottom line, Loctite recommends putting 5452 on the flared male surface of JIC fittings and on the threads. Dessalator recommends putting 542 (a thread locker only) on the smooth flared surface. Easy to pick the correct one.  

Cheers, Craig

--In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Craig & All,

You are correct about Loctite, and I said, that until yesterday, that is what I believed.

HOWEVER, I am correct about Dessalator stating this is required. In this case I believe that any Amel Owner should defer to what Dessalator states.

ADDITIONALLY, To ensure my complete understanding of what Dessalator was saying, I exchanged several drawings with Dessalator illustrating the application on the flare part of the JIC.

OF COURSE, any owner can and should make his own judgement as to what to do in  this case. 

I was hoping that my communication the Amel Owner's Group would be appreciated, rather than argued. I will consider this issue the next time I learn something that I believe owners would want to know.

A client of Amel School is testing the Dessalator procedure this week to see if it will stop the slight leak at the flare joint. We are hopeful that it will, however, I think there is at least a 50% chance that the flare faces are damaged and that is the cause of his leak. Possibly he will report on this thread the results.

Best,
Bill Rouse

On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 9:57 AM sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill and All,


Yes, do use a sealant on JIC fittings. Perhaps a typo in BebeBill's post, but Henkel, the manufactured of Loctite, does not recommend Loctite 542 for this, They recommend Loctite 5452 and state it should be applied to both the male face of the JIC fitting and to the threads (for vibration resistance). See their data sheet for more info at https://www.turtle.com/ASSETS/DOCUMENTS/ITEMS/EN/Loctite_1265769_Datasheet.pdf

Another option, perhaps easier to use, is the Flaretite Seal, which is a thin 304 stainless seal with L octite baked on. Just insert it over the JIC and connect.  And, of course, other brands are out there.

Cheers,  Craig Br iggs, SN68 Sangaris

---In amelyachtowners@...,
All,
Please read all of this.

Just when I was fairly confident that I knew all I needed to know about changing/servicing Dessalator Membranes, I learned something new from Dessalator, France.

As you know, the Dessalator High Pressure Hoses connect to the High Pressure Pump, Control Panel, and Membranes utilizing a stainless steel JIC Flare fitting. A JIC fitting is widely used in many industries for connections of fluid-carrying hoses at high pressure. JIC fitting connections have matched 37-degree flare seating surfaces. I have always believed that JIC seals metal-to-metal. I was wrong in terms of Dessalator.

Dessalator notified me yesterday to use Loctite 542 on the "flare part only" of all JIC fittings....(non-relevant text deleted).

Best, Bill Rouse



 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: IMPORTANT - Dessalator JIC Flare fittings on High Pressure Hoses + More

Craig Briggs
 


Hey Bill,

On the second part of your post about the gal with the possibly damaged high pressure flare faces, I've had perfect results with leaking/damaged flare joint in the past with the Flaretite seals which actually provide fresh metal for the sealing joint, along with the baked on Loctite. Certainly worth a try and much better than Loctite alone.

Cheers, Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris

--In amelyachtowners@..., <brouse@...> wrote :

Craig & All,

......(2nd part of original post)...................A client of Amel School is testing the Dessalator procedure this week to see if it will stop the slight leak at the flare joint. We are hopeful that it will, however, I think there is at least a 50% chance that the flare faces are damaged and that is the cause of his leak. Possibly he will report on this thread the results.

Best,
Bill Rouse


Re: Boots for spreaders

arthur saftlas
 

A properly trimmed genoa should not touch a spreader.

"The cure for anything is salt water; sweat, tears, or the sea." - Karen Blixen




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: IMPORTANT - Dessalator JIC Flare fittings on High Pressure Hoses + More

Craig Briggs
 

Oh Bill, puleeze - nobody's arguing. Not worth getting your pants in a bunch. The Dessalator guy just had the wrong Loctite number. I'm sure you accurately reported the (incorrect) info he gave you.  Not a biggie - we still love you!

So bottom line, Loctite recommends putting 5452 on the flared male surface of JIC fittings and on the threads. Dessalator recommends putting 542 (a thread locker only) on the smooth flared surface. Easy to pick the correct one.  

Cheers, Craig

--In amelyachtowners@..., <brouse@...> wrote :

Craig & All,

You are correct about Loctite, and I said, that until yesterday, that is what I believed.

HOWEVER, I am correct about Dessalator stating this is required. In this case I believe that any Amel Owner should defer to what Dessalator states.

ADDITIONALLY, To ensure my complete understanding of what Dessalator was saying, I exchanged several drawings with Dessalator illustrating the application on the flare part of the JIC.

OF COURSE, any owner can and should make his own judgement as to what to do in  this case. 

I was hoping that my communication the Amel Owner's Group would be appreciated, rather than argued. I will consider this issue the next time I learn something that I believe owners would want to know.

A client of Amel School is testing the Dessalator procedure this week to see if it will stop the slight leak at the flare joint. We are hopeful that it will, however, I think there is at least a 50% chance that the flare faces are damaged and that is the cause of his leak. Possibly he will report on this thread the results.

Best,
Bill Rouse

On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 9:57 AM sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill and All,


Yes, do use a sealant on JIC fittings. Perhaps a typo in BebeBill's post, but Henkel, the manufactured of Loctite, does not recommend Loctite 542 for this, They recommend Loctite 5452 and state it should be applied to both the male face of the JIC fitting and to the threads (for vibration resistance). See their data sheet for more info at https://www.turtle.com/ASSETS/DOCUMENTS/ITEMS/EN/Loctite_1265769_Datasheet.pdf

Another option, perhaps easier to use, is the Flaretite Seal, which is a thin 304 stainless seal with Loctite baked on. Just insert it over the JIC and connect.  And, of course, other brands are out there.

Cheers,  Craig Br iggs, SN68 Sangaris

---In amelyachtowners@..., <brouse@...> wrote :
All,
Please read all of this.

Just when I was fairly confident that I knew all I needed to know about changing/servicing Dessalator Membranes, I learned something new from Dessalator, France.

As you know, the Dessalator High Pressure Hoses connect to the High Pressure Pump, Control Panel, and Membranes utilizing a stainless steel JIC Flare fitting. A JIC fitting is widely used in many industries for connections of fluid-carrying hoses at high pressure. JIC fitting connections have matched 37-degree flare seating surfaces. I have always believed that JIC seals metal-to-metal. I was wrong in terms of Dessalator.

Dessalator notified me yesterday to use Loctite 542 on the "flare part only" of all JIC fittings....(non-relevant text deleted).

Best, Bill Rouse



 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: IMPORTANT - Dessalator JIC Flare fittings on High Pressure Hoses + More

Alan Leslie
 

Our Dessaltor DUO 60 manual, English version, states :

"The HP connectors should be installed strictly in accordance with the instructions (Appendix A2). Apply a little loctite or nut seal to the two male and female cones before tightening"

BUT this is not mentioned in the French version which came with the boat.

We have had leaks also from the tapered thread connector that screws into the membrane housing.

I use hydraulic thread sealant on all the metal to metal connections.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Alternator and Masse leak detector

 

Nick,

I am sending you an Off-Group, direct email.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970






On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 1:00 PM Nick Newington ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Bill,


I am the second owner.

The engine is original. I purchased the boat in June 2017,  it had been ashore in Grenada for three years as the then owner was very ill and unable to use the boat.

The only thing that was changed on the engine in my ownership has been the turbo boost pressure sensor. This was a five minute job to remove the old sensor and replace with new sensor. Done by Volvo agent in Martinique.

In the year I have owned the boat I have had no zinc sacrifice beyond normal, there was until recently no fault on the indicator including just after the turbo boost  sensor was replaced. So this fault is new.

I already have a propeller zinc.

Is there a way in which I can test if the Isolated ground has been defeated?

Nick
On 19 Jun 2018, at 16:07, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Nick,

Your problem may be an indication of something much more serious.

How long have you owned this Amel 54? Has there been an engine change, or any sensors changed?

When Amel installed the Volvo D3-110, it had been modified to be Isolated Ground by Volvo France. If you ask any Volvo dealer to check the serial number for such a modification, it will not show up on Volvos database. In fact, it is difficult to find any Volvo record of this modification which occurred with 100% of all D3s installed when the 54 was built by Amel. 

I believe that your Isolated Ground has been defeated because of either:
  1. Engine change
  2. Non-Isolated Ground sensors or switches installed replacing original ones
  3. Some other modification made by some "expert" which has defeated the Non-Isolated Ground
Yes, if any of the above are true, when you disconnect the 24VDC Negative from the 24VDC Alternator, you will remove the fault indicated on the Bonding test circuit..

I consider this issue serious and you should seek expert help.. A defeated Isolated Ground has been the cause of ruined C-Drives and other serious issues. Until you have this resolved, you should add a propeller zinc, although that will not completely protect things.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970






On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 5:23 AM Nick Newington ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Alan,


I have had an electrician check the boat for me and I asked him to look into the -ve leak and to then try some diagnosis.

This is his reply  "I checked the leak controller, it shows a leak in negativ. I tried several things like bilge pump but nothing changed. When I dismantled the negativ from the 24 V alternator, the leak light went off. So, the problem might be the alternator or somewhere at the engine.”

So I reckon that this would suggest a fault on the 24v alternator or some kind of leak to the bonding system from the engine.

Nick


On 19 Jun 2018, at 02:18, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi Nick,


We have a NEXT STEP-2 reg ...there is a file in the Files section showing how I did it

The reg in the Leece  Neville alt is not designed to charge deep cycle batteries.
Keeping the voltage always at 28.8V will eventually kill your AGM batteries. They need a bulk, absorption, float regimen if they are to be cared for properly.

We have 
600W solar panels and  a Victron MPPT controller
Leece Neville 175A engine alt with Next Step-2 reg
Victron Skyalla 100A charger
Promariner 30A charger

and they are all set to the same absorption and float voltages.


Diodes fail open, I don't think that can be the cause of your problem.

Somewhere on some device that has both 24VDC feed AND a connection to the bonding system, there is a connection between -ve and the bonding connection...and it may not be a metal to metal contact , frequently it is through the sea water. 

Good Luck
Alan
Elyse SM437  Yasawa-i-rara







Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Alternator and Masse leak detector

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Bill,

I am the second owner.

The engine is original. I purchased the boat in June 2017,  it had been ashore in Grenada for three years as the then owner was very ill and unable to use the boat.

The only thing that was changed on the engine in my ownership has been the turbo boost pressure sensor. This was a five minute job to remove the old sensor and replace with new sensor. Done by Volvo agent in Martinique.

In the year I have owned the boat I have had no zinc sacrifice beyond normal, there was until recently no fault on the indicator including just after the turbo boost  sensor was replaced. So this fault is new.

I already have a propeller zinc.

Is there a way in which I can test if the Isolated ground has been defeated?

Nick

On 19 Jun 2018, at 16:07, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Nick,

Your problem may be an indication of something much more serious.

How long have you owned this Amel 54? Has there been an engine change, or any sensors changed?

When Amel installed the Volvo D3-110, it had been modified to be Isolated Ground by Volvo France. If you ask any Volvo dealer to check the serial number for such a modification, it will not show up on Volvos database. In fact, it is difficult to find any Volvo record of this modification which occurred with 100% of all D3s installed when the 54 was built by Amel. 

I believe that your Isolated Ground has been defeated because of either:
  1. Engine change
  2. Non-Isolated Ground sensors or switches installed replacing original ones
  3. Some other modification made by some "expert" which has defeated the Non-Isolated Ground
Yes, if any of the above are true, when you disconnect the 24VDC Negative from the 24VDC Alternator, you will remove the fault indicated on the Bonding test circuit..

I consider this issue serious and you should seek expert help. A defeated Isolated Ground has been the cause of ruined C-Drives and other serious issues. Until you have this resolved, you should add a propeller zinc, although that will not completely protect things.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970






On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 5:23 AM Nick Newington ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Alan,


I have had an electrician check the boat for me and I asked him to look into the -ve leak and to then try some diagnosis.

This is his reply  "I checked the leak controller, it shows a leak in negativ. I tried several things like bilge pump but nothing changed. When I dismantled the negativ from the 24 V alternator, the leak light went off. So, the problem might be the alternator or somewhere at the engine.”

So I reckon that this would suggest a fault on the 24v alternator or some kind of leak to the bonding system from the engine.

Nick


On 19 Jun 2018, at 02:18, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi Nick,


We have a NEXT STEP-2 reg ...there is a file in the Files section showing how I did it

The reg in the Leece  Neville alt is not designed to charge deep cycle batteries.
Keeping the voltage always at 28.8V will eventually kill your AGM batteries. They need a bulk, absorption, float regimen if they are to be cared for properly.

We have 
600W solar panels and  a Victron MPPT controller
Leece Neville 175A engine alt with Next Step-2 reg
Victron Skyalla 100A charger
Promariner 30A charger

and they are all set to the same absorption and float voltages.


Diodes fail open, I don't think that can be the cause of your problem.

Somewhere on some device that has both 24VDC feed AND a connection to the bonding system, there is a connection between -ve and the bonding connection...and it may not be a metal to metal contact , frequently it is through the sea water. 

Good Luck
Alan
Elyse SM437  Yasawa-i-rara







Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Boots for spreaders

Patrick McAneny
 

Craig, First off, I am no Gentleman , ask my wife. Secondly , I spoke to my sail maker and will be sending it off for a patch, but I still want to put a boot on to lessen the chafe in the future. I just now think I found one on Amazon I will order, not cheap $100/pair.
Pat
SM3123



-----Original Message-----
From: sangaris@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 9:41 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Boots for spreaders

 
Hey Pat,
Gentlemen don't sail upwind.  :-)

An option I've used is chafe patches on the genoa.

Cheers, Craig


---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailw32@...> wrote :

I have considerable chafe on my genoa that is only a few years old and maybe about 5000 miles on it. Its obviously rubbing on the spreader. Has anyone bought  boots for the spreaders on a SM that fit well. I have the wheels , but they don't provide enough protection.
Thanks,
Pat
SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] How to flush Volvo D3-110i-C

 

Bob,

This is all good. Thanks. 


Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Tue, Jun 19, 2018, 00:24 rossidesigngroup@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Regarding fresh water flushes.  We also flush our entire system with fresh water (we do not have a loop for refrigerators but we also flush the pumps and lines to the toilets).  


However, we do this more frequently--when we are at the dock for more than a few days and even at anchor and sometimes we use the recommended mixture of Salt-A-Way.  We have been at the dock here at Cagliari for 8 days and will depart today--everything: Yanmar, Onan, AC, Anchor Wash, toilet pumps, and of course the sea chest and manifold have been in fresh water (measured at 140 ppm) the entire time.  Fresh water helps disolve deposits, prevents or kills marine growth, minimizes galvanic action.

We have a ball valve that isolates water from the manifold to the Dessalator.  When the Dessalator is flushed with fresh water, we let the water push back into the manifold and then shut the ball valve.  This keeps the supply hose to the low pressure pump in fresh water and prevents, say Salt-A-Way from entering the Dessalator system.

When we make water at anchor we usually divert the first few minutes of production into several 5 litre jugs that we keep on the engine room floor.  Usually this initial product has higher ppm and potential odor.  We use this same water to flush the generator/manifold etc. when we are finished.  It does not take much to flush the generator, manifold, engine, anchor wash.  We think it costs about $0.10/liter to make our own water so for a buck or 2 you have more than enough fresh water to do the job.

A couple of other actions regarding fresh water.  When we are at a dock and have been anchoring, we pull the chain out into a large rubber bucket that normally stores cleaning products and brushes.  We fill the bucket with fresh water and let the chain soak, change the water, and then let the chain dry on deck before it goes back into the chain locker.  Our guess is that most chain rust happens in the chain locker when the moist, salt laden chain sits there.  This may be another reason why the overhead of the chain locker deteriorates on some Amels. If we get a chance we also spray out the inside of the chain locker.

None of these actions seem burdensome to us.  If you build it into a routine, it is not complicated.  A side benefit is that they let us monitor how well the impellers and pumps are pulling water.

When underway we keep a large plastic bowl in our head sinks (the kind with a soft urethane bottom on the lower third of the bowl).  Most water is used for hand washing and face washing and that soapy water is just poured into the toilet and flushed....flushing it and keeping it in fresh water for periods of time as well.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI SM429
 
< /p>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: IMPORTANT - Dessalator JIC Flare fittings on High Pressure Hoses + More

 

Craig & All,

You are correct about Loctite, and I said, that until yesterday, that is what I believed.

HOWEVER, I am correct about Dessalator stating this is required. In this case I believe that any Amel Owner should defer to what Dessalator states.

ADDITIONALLY, To ensure my complete understanding of what Dessalator was saying, I exchanged several drawings with Dessalator illustrating the application on the flare part of the JIC.

OF COURSE, any owner can and should make his own judgement as to what to do in  this case. 

I was hoping that my communication the Amel Owner's Group would be appreciated, rather than argued. I will consider this issue the next time I learn something that I believe owners would want to know.

A client of Amel School is testing the Dessalator procedure this week to see if it will stop the slight leak at the flare joint. We are hopeful that it will, however, I think there is at least a 50% chance that the flare faces are damaged and that is the cause of his leak. Possibly he will report on this thread the results.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970






On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 9:57 AM sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill and All,


Yes, do use a sealant on JIC fittings. Perhaps a typo in BebeBill's post, but Henkel, the manufactured of Loctite, does not recommend Loctite 542 for this, They recommend Loctite 5452 and state it should be applied to both the male face of the JIC fitting and to the threads (for vibration resistance). See their data sheet for more info at https://www.turtle.com/ASSETS/DOCUMENTS/ITEMS/EN/Loctite_1265769_Datasheet.pdf

Another option, perhaps easier to use, is the Flaretite Seal, which is a thin 304 stainless seal with Loctite baked on. Just insert it over the JIC and connect.  And, of course, other brands are out there.

Cheers,  Craig Br iggs, SN68 Sangaris

---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :
All,
Please read all of this.

Just when I was fairly confident that I knew all I needed to know about changing/servicing Dessalator Membranes, I learned something new from Dessalator, France.

As you know, the Dessalator High Pressure Hoses connect to the High Pressure Pump, Control Panel, and Membranes utilizing a stainless steel JIC Flare fitting. A JIC fitting is widely used in many industries for connections of fluid-carrying hoses at high pressure. JIC fitting connections have matched 37-degree flare seating surfaces. I have always believed that JIC seals metal-to-metal. I was wrong in terms of Dessalator.

Dessalator notified me yesterday to use Loctite 542 on the "flare part only" of all JIC fittings....(non-relevant text deleted).

Best, Bill Rouse



 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: IMPORTANT - Dessalator JIC Flare fittings on High Pressure Hoses + More

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Martin from Dessalator technical also recommended the use of Loctite 542 for the installation of a high pressure gauge that had gone bad.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad and Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54 #099
 



From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 7:51 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: IMPORTANT - Dessalator JIC Flare fittings on High Pressure Hoses + More

 

Bill and All,


Yes, do use a sealant on JIC fittings. Perhaps a typo in BebeBill's post, but Henkel, the manufactured of Loctite, does not recommend Loctite 542 for this, They recommend Loctite 5452 and state it should be applied to both the male face of the JIC fitting and to the threads (for vibration resistance). See their data sheet for more info at https://www.turtle.com/ASSETS/DOCUMENTS/ITEMS/EN/Loctite_1265769_Datasheet.pdf

Another option, perhaps easier to use, is the Flaretite Seal, which is a thin 304 stainless seal with Loctite baked on. Just insert it over the JIC and connect.  And, of course, other brands are out there.

Cheers,  Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris

---In amelyachtowners@..., <brouse@...> wrote :
All,
Please read all of this.

Just when I was fairly confident that I knew all I needed to know about changing/servicing Dessalator Membranes, I learned something new from Dessalator, France.

As you know, the Dessalator High Pressure Hoses connect to the High Pressure Pump, Control Panel, and Membranes utilizing a stainless steel JIC Flare fitting. A JIC fitting is widely used in many industries for connections of fluid-carrying hoses at high pressure. JIC fitting connections have matched 37-degree flare seating surfaces. I have always believed that JIC seals metal-to-metal. I was wrong in terms of Dessalator.

Dessalator notified me yesterday to use Loctite 542 on the "flare part only" of all JIC fittings....(non-relevant text deleted).

Best, Bill Rouse



 

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