Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SSB Grounding/Earthing

danielmfrey63@...
 

Hello Jean-Pierre

Thank you!

I have been here before, but most recently was more active on the FB sites.

Thx for Your input.

Best - Daniel


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: SSB Grounding/Earthing

eric freedman
 

Hi Alan,

I’ll  have to look at my setup.

 

On another subject, I just had Kimberlite  re-rigged in Martinique. I had them remove the insulators on the triadic as it was used for my Weatherfax which is now history. I removed the coax and all is well. However there is another piece of coax in the mizzen, and in the aft head it is marked BLU—do you know what that means- I did not have a chance to trace it back to the nav station before I left Kimberlite. I thought it might

 have been for the Navtex which was a part of the Weatherfax but required a separate antenna.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 10:50 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: SSB Grounding/Earthing

 

 

Nope Eric,

 

The green/yellow cable marked BLU runs from the copper strap in the lazarette to a ground connector at the navstation where without an SSB (BLU) installed it is connected to the bonding wire. I disconnected the BLU cable from the ground/bonding connection and connected it to the earth on the transceiver...yes the transceiver.

Then at the lazarette end I cut this cable and connected both ends to the ground on the antenna tuner. So, now we have both the transceiver ground and the tuner ground connected to the copper strap in the lazarette which in turn is connected to the SSB ground plates on the skeg.

This is what the ICOM manual instructs you to do.

The transceiver and antenna tuner MUST have an adequate RF ground connection. 

 

The transceiver is NOT connected to the ships bonding.

 

BUT because internally the ICOM 12v -ve is connected to the ICOM ground, the negative side of the power supply must be isolated from the ships power -ve otherwise there will be a circuit through the seawater from ships negative to ships bonding...which is not allowed in the Amel system.

This can be accomplished by using an ISOLATED 24-12VDC converter (expensive) or with a non-isolated converter (inexpensive) and a relay in the -ve 24V supply to the converter such that this connection is only closed when the SSB is on. The small amount of time the SSB is on is nowhere near enough to cause a problem.

 

Cheers

Alan

Elyse SM437

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

greatketch@...
 

I agree with the Dessalator rep that RO processing can remove essentially all bacteria and viruses. 

The problem is you can only be SURE that it will if you run a bubble point test to make sure there are zero faults in the membranes, seals, and housings. When I used RO membranes in the phamra business to make sterile water we had to test them every membrane change and maintenance cycle.  They did not always pass.

This is why my Dessalator manual recommends adding chlorine to the tank--just in case.

When I have been in crowded harbors with the possibility of sewage contamination there has never been a pressing reason I HAD to run the water maker.  I just wait until I am somewhere safer. We tend not to stay in places like that for very long!  If for some reason I had to make water, I would add chlorine to the tank, and then not worry about it.

My basic rule is: If I would not swim in the water, I don't make drinking water out of it--even if the RO unit SHOULD be able to do it safely. The risk of having a serious problem is very, very small, but it is still one I don't need to take, so why? 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


---In amelyachtowners@..., <mshirloo@...> wrote :

Hi All;
 
We also only use desalinated water in the fresh water tank. We empty out completely when we leave her for the winter.
 
As far as concerns about pollution in the water where we are running the desalinate, I talked to Martin at Dessalator when we initially purchased our 54 to find out exactly where we could use it to have safe fresh water. Martin has been at Dessalator tech department for a long time and is extremely knowledgeable about their systems. He assured me that the unit can be used almost anywhere and that the filtration is so fine that bacteria and even viruses would not go through. He mentioned that we simply clog up the pre-filters quicker by using it in water that has contaminants.
 
We have used ours in harbors and marinas without any issues. We regularly check the quality of the water and we are usually in the 220 PPM range. I believe the safe water level is 500 PPM. I guess I never asked if it makes a difference what the "parts" are.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0903 Fax
 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 6:29 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

 

We never add anything to the fresh water tanks, except RO water.  We avoid running the RO system in harbors, and any place we even suspect might be polluted. We routinely keep the tank as near to full as we can.  The only exception has been when we are in a boatyard for longer than a tank of water lasts, we eventually have to break down and put tap water in.

If I was anyplace I worried about any kind of pathogen in the source water, I'd break my own "rules" and would chlorinate the tank just to be safe.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL

---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailw32@...> wrote :

Bill, Since you don't use bleach , what if anything do you put in your water tank to reduce bacteria growth .
Happy Holidays,
Pat SM #123



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: SSB Grounding/Earthing

Alan Leslie
 

Nope Eric,

The green/yellow cable marked BLU runs from the copper strap in the lazarette to a ground connector at the navstation where without an SSB (BLU) installed it is connected to the bonding wire. I disconnected the BLU cable from the ground/bonding connection and connected it to the earth on the transceiver...yes the transceiver.
Then at the lazarette end I cut this cable and connected both ends to the ground on the antenna tuner. So, now we have both the transceiver ground and the tuner ground connected to the copper strap in the lazarette which in turn is connected to the SSB ground plates on the skeg.
This is what the ICOM manual instructs you to do.
The transceiver and antenna tuner MUST have an adequate RF ground connection. 

The transceiver is NOT connected to the ships bonding.

BUT because internally the ICOM 12v -ve is connected to the ICOM ground, the negative side of the power supply must be isolated from the ships power -ve otherwise there will be a circuit through the seawater from ships negative to ships bonding...which is not allowed in the Amel system.
This can be accomplished by using an ISOLATED 24-12VDC converter (expensive) or with a non-isolated converter (inexpensive) and a relay in the -ve 24V supply to the converter such that this connection is only closed when the SSB is on. The small amount of time the SSB is on is nowhere near enough to cause a problem.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi All;
 
We also only use desalinated water in the fresh water tank. We empty out completely when we leave her for the winter.
 
As far as concerns about pollution in the water where we are running the desalinate, I talked to Martin at Dessalator when we initially purchased our 54 to find out exactly where we could use it to have safe fresh water. Martin has been at Dessalator tech department for a long time and is extremely knowledgeable about their systems. He assured me that the unit can be used almost anywhere and that the filtration is so fine that bacteria and even viruses would not go through. He mentioned that we simply clog up the pre-filters quicker by using it in water that has contaminants.
 
We have used ours in harbors and marinas without any issues. We regularly check the quality of the water and we are usually in the 220 PPM range. I believe the safe water level is 500 PPM. I guess I never asked if it makes a difference what the "parts" are.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0903 Fax
 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 6:29 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

 

We never add anything to the fresh water tanks, except RO water.  We avoid running the RO system in harbors, and any place we even suspect might be polluted. We routinely keep the tank as near to full as we can.  The only exception has been when we are in a boatyard for longer than a tank of water lasts, we eventually have to break down and put tap water in.

If I was anyplace I worried about any kind of pathogen in the source water, I'd break my own "rules" and would chlorinate the tank just to be safe.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL

---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Bill, Since you don't use bleach , what if anything do you put in your water tank to reduce bacteria growth .
Happy Holidays,
Pat SM #123



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: SSB Grounding/Earthing

eric freedman
 

Hi Alan,

You wrote “When we installed our Icom 710, we disconnected this cable at the nav station and connected it to the transceiver ground...”

Did you mean tuner ground and not transceiver ground. The transceiver is the ICOM 710.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 10:05 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: SSB Grounding/Earthing

 

 

Hello Daniel,

It seems to me that in addition to those little wires you speak of, you need a solid grounding wire between the transceiver and the ground plane connection in the lazarette.

 

Look at the diagram on page 49 of your manual

 

Page 51 says :

 

The transceiver and antenna tuner MUST have an adequate RF ground connection. Otherwise, the overall efficiency of the transceiver and antenna tuner installation will be reduced. Electrolysis, electrical shocks and interference from other equipment could also occur. For best results, use 50 or 75 mm (2 or 3 inches) wide copper strap and make the connection as short as possible. Ground the transceiver and antenna tuner to one ground point, otherwise the voltage difference (in RF level) between 2 ground points may cause electrolysis.

 

 

In our SM the yellow/green cable from the lazarette ran all the way to the nav station. When we installed our Icom 710, we disconnected this cable at the nav station and connected it to the transceiver ground....at the other end we cut the cable and connected both ends to the tuner, which is connected to the copper strap in the lazarette.

 

This is NOT the bonding that the saltwater pumps etc are connected to.

 

VERY important thing is that you use ISOLATED power to your transceiver because inside the ICOM, the -ve power line is connected to ground. 

Your SN is a 12v system I think (?), if so and you have the power directly from the breaker, you need a relay in the 12 v -ve line that disconnects it from the transceiver when the power is off - you need to turn it off at the breaker, not just the transceiver.

If you have 24V then you need an ISOLATED 24-12v converter, or a relay in the 24V-ve feed to your 24-12v converter for the reasons above.

If you don't isolate that -ve power line, it will lead to electrolytic corrosion issues. 

Good luck

Happy New Year

Alan

Elyse SM437


Re: SSB Grounding/Earthing

Alan Leslie
 

Hello Daniel,
It seems to me that in addition to those little wires you speak of, you need a solid grounding wire between the transceiver and the ground plane connection in the lazarette.

Look at the diagram on page 49 of your manual

Page 51 says :

The transceiver and antenna tuner MUST have an adequate RF ground connection. Otherwise, the overall efficiency of the transceiver and antenna tuner installation will be reduced. Electrolysis, electrical shocks and interference from other equipment could also occur. For best results, use 50 or 75 mm (2 or 3 inches) wide copper strap and make the connection as short as possible. Ground the transceiver and antenna tuner to one ground point, otherwise the voltage difference (in RF level) between 2 ground points may cause electrolysis.


In our SM the yellow/green cable from the lazarette ran all the way to the nav station. When we installed our Icom 710, we disconnected this cable at the nav station and connected it to the transceiver ground....at the other end we cut the cable and connected both ends to the tuner, which is connected to the copper strap in the lazarette.

This is NOT the bonding that the saltwater pumps etc are connected to.

VERY important thing is that you use ISOLATED power to your transceiver because inside the ICOM, the -ve power line is connected to ground. 
Your SN is a 12v system I think (?), if so and you have the power directly from the breaker, you need a relay in the 12 v -ve line that disconnects it from the transceiver when the power is off - you need to turn it off at the breaker, not just the transceiver.
If you have 24V then you need an ISOLATED 24-12v converter, or a relay in the 24V-ve feed to your 24-12v converter for the reasons above.
If you don't isolate that -ve power line, it will lead to electrolytic corrosion issues. 
Good luck
Happy New Year
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Weigh carrying capacity of SM

karkauai
 

Thank you Olivier, that's exactly what I wanted to know.  It looks like I can safely carry ~1250 lbs of supplies over my cruising gear and provisions.  A bit disappointing, but want to be safe and take care of my Kristy.

Happy Holidays to you and the rest of our Amel family.

Kent
S/V Kristy SM243
Hello Kent and Bill,

overloading a vessel not only changes its stability but also brings more power into the structure and masts/rigging.
A big overload could result in stringers/bulkheads breaking when the vessel hits the waves in heavy conditions, possibly breaking shrouds strands too.
The Super Maramu has a light displacement of 15.3 tons (with masts, sails, running rigging, some mooring lines and fenders). The tanks (water and fuel) take 1.5 tons.
You should not load with more than 2.5 tons (including crew and life-raft...).

Stay safe and have all a happy new year!

Olivier


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

greatketch@...
 

We never add anything to the fresh water tanks, except RO water.  We avoid running the RO system in harbors, and any place we even suspect might be polluted. We routinely keep the tank as near to full as we can.  The only exception has been when we are in a boatyard for longer than a tank of water lasts, we eventually have to break down and put tap water in.

If I was anyplace I worried about any kind of pathogen in the source water, I'd break my own "rules" and would chlorinate the tank just to be safe.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL

---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailw32@...> wrote :

Bill, Since you don't use bleach , what if anything do you put in your water tank to reduce bacteria growth .
Happy Holidays,
Pat SM #123



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Weigh carrying capacity of SM

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Also to add to Olivier’s comment: Helvetia/De Lassee insurance contrat says that if the boat is overload they will void the insurance…

Sincerely, Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 12/27/17, Beaute Olivier atlanticyachtsurvey@yahoo.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Weigh carrying capacity of SM
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wednesday, December 27, 2017, 1:34 PM


 









Hello
Kent and Bill,
overloading
a vessel not only changes its stability but also brings more
power into the structure and masts/rigging.A big
overload could result in stringers/bulkheads breaking when
the vessel hits the waves in heavy conditions, possibly
breaking shrouds strands too.The
Super Maramu has a light displacement of 15.3 tons (with
masts, sails, running rigging, some mooring lines and
fenders). The tanks (water and fuel) take 1.5
tons.You
should not load with more than 2.5 tons (including crew and
life-raft...).
Stay
safe and have all a happy new year!
Olivier


On Monday, December
25, 2017 6:46 PM, "greatketch@yahoo.com
[amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



 









Kent,
I
suspect when you describe your boat's current waterline
status you are looking at the painted waterline on the
hull.  That is not the waterline as drawn for the boat on
her design drawings.  
When we picked up
Harmonie she was almost empty of gear.  I saw the
painted waterline was significantly higher at the bow then
the stern. About 3 inches if my memory is correct.  This
struck me as very odd for an unloaded boat.  So I measured
the distance from the water to the gunwale at bow and stern
and compared to the architects drawing.  She was spot on
her correct fore and aft trim as per the
drawing.
Take away
lesson:  The painted waterline is not necessarily where she
should sit!  If you were to load our boat until the water
at the bow was even with the painted line, you would have
water at the top of the bowthruster well, and maybe over
it!  Note that I have NOT done this measurement on ANY
other Amel.  It is possible it only applies to #160.  Amel
might have changed the painted waterlines at other times, or
a previous owner might have changed yours!  
I do not know if Amel painted the
waterline higher at the bow on our boat as an aesthetic
thing, or just got it wrong, but it's definitely not
where the boat should sit in the water.

As for how much you can
carry...
A Super Maramu has a LWL
of 41.3 feet, a Waterline Beam of about 14.5
feet...A SM
has a LWL Area of (very roughly) 0.67 *41.3* 14.5 ~ 400 sq
feetSo to
sink her a extra inch overall will take 400 * 5.33 ~ 2,100
lbs or close to one ton. That's actually a
pretty conservative number for a SM because as she settles
deeper her LWL becomes a bit longer. (Ref:  http://www.tedbrewer.com/yachtdesign.html)
So how deep you can take
her...  I don't have a good answer.  
If loaded so the heavy
stuff was down as low as possible and not concentrated at
the ends of the boat, I'd guess two inches (two tons)
would be a conservative number.  
Carrying that much
weight as "deck cargo" would certainly reduce the
stability of the boat. But I have no idea if it would be
dangerous because I don't know her designed center of
gravity or metacentric height.  For a real answer I think
you'll have to talk to a naval architect, or ask
Amel.
Honestly, my suggestion
would be to take the money you would spend on the fuel for
that trip and donate it to have the material shipped
commercially to the nearest working port.  

Bill KinneySM160,
HarmonieKey West, FL

---In
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, <karkauai@...> wrote
:

Hi all.

We are going to carry supplies to Caribbean from Ft
Lauderdale to hurricane stricken islands this winter.
I'm wondering how much weight I can take on safely.
Loaded with all our supplies and provisions, Kristy sits
about 1 1/2 inches above the original waterline in the
stern, and 4 inches above waterline at the bow.



Can I load her to that waterline? If I go above it, the
engine and generator exhausts will be below the water.
That doesn't seem like a good idea. If that is ok, what
other considerations are important if I load her another
inch or more above the waterline?



I was going to carry one pallet (40" x 40"
x48") on the foreword cabintop and another one or two
broken down below decks as carrying capacity allows. I
don't know the weight of the pallets yet.



Any thoughts?



Thanks andMerry Christmas!

Kent

SM 243

Kristy


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

Mark Pitt
 

Hi Thomas,

   I burned quite a bit of fuel doing the Panama to Galapagos trip in 2004 in my SM.  I bought fuel in Academy Bay (Galapagos) and ran it though my fuel polisher on the way to my tank.  Other cruisers with me in the Galapago also bought fuel and used their Baja or other filters.  None of us had a problem.  Compared to Indonesia and some other places, the fuel seem quite good.  On the 19 day passage from the Galapagos to Fatu Hiva (Marquesas) we only used about 300 liters but at the time of departure I certainly felt better knowing that the boat was full up with fuel (including 8 jerry cans).  I even filled a couple of jerry cans on Islas Isabella just before departure. The Galapagos was great -- a real highlight, albeit a bit rolly.  Don't miss it over fuel concerns.

    Mark Pitt

  Sabbatical III, SM #419, currently in Spain


On 12/27/2017 3:31 PM, thomas.kleman wrote:
Thanks Bill- We don't motor sail either, and try to sail from and to anchorable depths as a game (and for that time when our engine quits at an inopportune time). My interest in the fuel project is that we are planning on heading west from Bonaire after this next hurricane season and sailing to Columbia, Panama, and on to French Polynesia. I don't mind admitting that this will be a step up for us in terms of distance (it's just my wife and I).........I'm researching the fuel issue as I look at videos and read about the challenges of the routes I'm considering.

Depending on whether we stop in the Galapagos, the leg from Panama could be 28 days..........an extra 100-200 liters of fuel hopefully wouldn't be needed but might reduce my own stress in the first 10 days. We currently keep 5 Jerry cans in the life raft locker at the bottom and have the raft in the port cockpit lazarette. I'm not entirely happy with this arrangement and I've been researching alternatives for 3 years, off and on. 

Always good to get input from Amel owners who have more miles under their keels than we do.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

eric freedman
 

Hi Thomas,

Did you read my posts about adding fuel bladders and auxiliary tanks to  Kimberlite Amel

Super Maramu #376?

 

The fuel in the Galapagos can be quite poor and I would not suggest taking on fuel there.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of thomas.kleman
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 3:31 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

 

Thanks Bill- We don't motor sail either, and try to sail from and to anchorable depths as a game (and for that time when our engine quits at an inopportune time). My interest in the fuel project is that we are planning on heading west from Bonaire after this next hurricane season and sailing to Columbia, Panama, and on to French Polynesia. I don't mind admitting that this will be a step up for us in terms of distance (it's just my wife and I).........I'm researching the fuel issue as I look at videos and read about the challenges of the routes I'm considering.

 

Depending on whether we stop in the Galapagos, the leg from Panama could be 28 days..........an extra 100-200 liters of fuel hopefully wouldn't be needed but might reduce my own stress in the first 10 days. We currently keep 5 Jerry cans in the life raft locker at the bottom and have the raft in the port cockpit lazarette. I'm not entirely happy with this arrangement and I've been researching alternatives for 3 years, off and on. 

 

Always good to get input from Amel owners who have more miles under their keels than we do.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

thomas.kleman <no_reply@...>
 

Thanks Bill- We don't motor sail either, and try to sail from and to anchorable depths as a game (and for that time when our engine quits at an inopportune time). My interest in the fuel project is that we are planning on heading west from Bonaire after this next hurricane season and sailing to Columbia, Panama, and on to French Polynesia. I don't mind admitting that this will be a step up for us in terms of distance (it's just my wife and I).........I'm researching the fuel issue as I look at videos and read about the challenges of the routes I'm considering.

Depending on whether we stop in the Galapagos, the leg from Panama could be 28 days..........an extra 100-200 liters of fuel hopefully wouldn't be needed but might reduce my own stress in the first 10 days. We currently keep 5 Jerry cans in the life raft locker at the bottom and have the raft in the port cockpit lazarette. I'm not entirely happy with this arrangement and I've been researching alternatives for 3 years, off and on. 

Always good to get input from Amel owners who have more miles under their keels than we do.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re-rigging and mast step

thomas.kleman <no_reply@...>
 

I was advised to run a line along the deck between the base of the main mast (the vang attaches here) and the on-deck cleat, with a fairlead about 12 inches to port of the mast; then to a dedicated block mounted under the genoa block in the large chainplate hole. In this way you can store the staysail sheet just above this block on the rail and retrieve it easily without going on deck in "staysail conditions".............based on an "N" of 2, it seems to work well although I'm still fiditzing with it.

Tom Kleman
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K # 422


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SSB Grounding/Earthing

eric freedman
 

Bill,

You have that 100 % right,

You do not want to hook the transceiver to the yellow green bonding.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 11:37 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...; Daniel Frey
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SSB Grounding/Earthing

 

 

Daniel,

 

You are asking a very important question. I have found that this subject seems to be misunderstood by many Amel owners and some Amel employees.

 

First and very important, from reading your email, I believe you may be confusing the yellow/green Amel Bonding wire with 220VAC "Earth." The 220VAC Earth wire is also yellow/green. You need to have a good understanding of the difference. This is especially confusing because they look identical.

 

Secondly, I am not an SSB expert, but FYI, when Amel installed an SSB on SM's, they did not connect any component to either the Amel bonding wire or Earth wire. 

 

Amel also removed the BLU wire which connects the skeg-mounted sintered SSB ground plate to the Amel Bonding system. On a SM this is behind a panel at the Nav station and the BLU yellow/green wire is connected to a connector block (see photo). The BLU wire is only connected to the sintered SSB ground plate. Once you disconnect it from the connector block at the cart table it is not connected to anything else.

 

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Weigh carrying capacity of SM

Beaute Olivier
 

Hello Kent and Bill,

overloading a vessel not only changes its stability but also brings more power into the structure and masts/rigging.
A big overload could result in stringers/bulkheads breaking when the vessel hits the waves in heavy conditions, possibly breaking shrouds strands too.
The Super Maramu has a light displacement of 15.3 tons (with masts, sails, running rigging, some mooring lines and fenders). The tanks (water and fuel) take 1.5 tons.
You should not load with more than 2.5 tons (including crew and life-raft...).

Stay safe and have all a happy new year!

Olivier


On Monday, December 25, 2017 6:46 PM, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Kent,

I suspect when you describe your boat's current waterline status you are looking at the painted waterline on the hull.  That is not the waterline as drawn for the boat on her design drawings.  

When we picked up Harmonie she was almost empty of gear.  I saw the painted waterline was significantly higher at the bow then the stern. About 3 inches if my memory is correct.  This struck me as very odd for an unloaded boat.  So I measured the distance from the water to the gunwale at bow and stern and compared to the architects drawing.  She was spot on her correct fore and aft trim as per the drawing.

Take away lesson:  The painted waterline is not necessarily where she should sit!  If you were to load our boat until the water at the bow was even with the painted line, you would have water at the top of the bowthruster well, and maybe over it!  Note that I have NOT done this measurement on ANY other Amel.  It is possible it only applies to #160.  Amel might have changed the painted waterlines at other times, or a previous owner might have changed yours!  

I do not know if Amel painted the waterline higher at the bow on our boat as an aesthetic thing, or just got it wrong, but it's definitely not where the boat should sit in the water.

As for how much you can carry...

A Super Maramu has a LWL of 41.3 feet, a Waterline Beam of about 14.5 feet...
A SM has a LWL Area of (very roughly) 0.67 *41.3* 14.5 ~ 400 sq feet
So to sink her a extra inch overall will take 400 * 5.33 ~ 2,100 lbs or close to one ton. 
That's actually a pretty conservative number for a SM because as she settles deeper her LWL becomes a bit longer. 

So how deep you can take her...  I don't have a good answer.  

If loaded so the heavy stuff was down as low as possible and not concentrated at the ends of the boat, I'd guess two inches (two tons) would be a conservative number.  

Carrying that much weight as "deck cargo" would certainly reduce the stability of the boat. But I have no idea if it would be dangerous because I don't know her designed center of gravity or metacentric height.  For a real answer I think you'll have to talk to a naval architect, or ask Amel.

Honestly, my suggestion would be to take the money you would spend on the fuel for that trip and donate it to have the material shipped commercially to the nearest working port.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Hi all.
We are going to carry supplies to Caribbean from Ft Lauderdale to hurricane stricken islands this winter. I'm wondering how much weight I can take on safely. Loaded with all our supplies and provisions, Kristy sits about 1 1/2 inches above the original waterline in the stern, and 4 inches above waterline at the bow.

Can I load her to that waterline? If I go above it, the engine and generator exhausts will be below the water. That doesn't seem like a good idea. If that is ok, what other considerations are important if I load her another inch or more above the waterline?

I was going to carry one pallet (40" x 40" x48") on the foreword cabintop and another one or two broken down below decks as carrying capacity allows. I don't know the weight of the pallets yet.

Any thoughts?

Thanks andMerry Christmas!
Kent
SM 243
Kristy



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SSB Grounding/Earthing

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Daniel,

You are asking a very important question. I have found that this subject seems to be misunderstood by many Amel owners and some Amel employees.

First and very important, from reading your email, I believe you may be confusing the yellow/green Amel Bonding wire with 220VAC "Earth." The 220VAC Earth wire is also yellow/green. You need to have a good understanding of the difference. This is especially confusing because they look identical.

Secondly, I am not an SSB expert, but FYI, when Amel installed an SSB on SM's, they did not connect any component to either the Amel bonding wire or Earth wire. 

Amel also removed the BLU wire which connects the skeg-mounted sintered SSB ground plate to the Amel Bonding system. On a SM this is behind a panel at the Nav station and the BLU yellow/green wire is connected to a connector block (see photo). The BLU wire is only connected to the sintered SSB ground plate. Once you disconnect it from the connector block at the cart table it is not connected to anything else.



Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pump Replacement and backflow preventers

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

B. Kinney,

Like I said, I have several theories as to why a one-way (check) valve was installed in the output line near the pump. However, to state those theories would be stating speculation and unlike some, I really don't like to publically speculate because it may be taken by others as fact. So, when I have a choice, I do not state unproven theories publically. And, when I am in in doubt, I believe it is safe to assume that Amel's original design is the best option.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Help- Where do I find...

jgermain@...
 

... files/photos etc to dismantle a Bonfiglioli Main sail outhaul?  I also need the numbers for the bearings and the seals to order replacements.


Second question: DRIFT... I have posted many replies to various queries yet my posts do not show when I open a thread... anyone doing me a dirty?


Happy New Year everyone.

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, Since you don't use bleach , what if anything do you put in your water tank to reduce bacteria growth .
Happy Holidays,
Pat SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Mon, Dec 25, 2017 3:34 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

 
We don't have any trouble with the bilge smell in the boat, for two reasons.  

We are not terribly fussy about what goes down the drain, but we do always was dishes with the strainer in the drain.  We also have a sink trap that catches other "chunks" under the sink in the galley. I wouldn't say we were any more careful about this than we would be in home without a garbage grinder.

We also have "U" traps made of three elbows and tubing where the drains empty into the sump.  Always full of water, they prevent the backup of any engine room odors into the cabin.

Bleach is something I don't use on the boat at all.  It is just too corrosive to too many things.

I clean the sump when it looks like it has accumulated enough "gunk" to need it.  It's not very often it needs it. I look whenever I am in the engin e room, but I don't have the cleaning on my routine maintenance schedule.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


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