Date   
Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

eric freedman
 

I was speaking about the power to our Amels from the 50 amp 220 volt 60 cycle outlet on the dock pedestal.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 10:11 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

 

 

I thought the USA was 110 volt??

Danny

On 18 August 2017 at 14:04 "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan,

Here in the USA you have 60 cycle 220-240 volts in all the outlets.

The water heater is a resistive device and doesn’t really care what frequency the electric is. The AC unit and chargers work on 50/60.

 

The dishwasher, Watermaker , and Washing Machine all work ONLY on  50 hz.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 1:14 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

 

 

Those are good ideas.  I used to have one of those Eva-Dry units and they are indeed a joke.  I had it for the summer though, not the winter.  It tends to be very dry here once the temperature goes below freezing.  My old boat had an Espar (Eberspacher), my new one does not.  That goes a long way towards keeping the boat dry because it exchanges air with the outside.  I think I'm going to try to heat with electric only this year rather than install one of those systems.  I also do not have a 50Hz inverter, but I'm sure I can find a similar dehumidifier that works at 60Hz.  I may also add a 50Hz inverter so I can run the washing machine.  Does anyone have experience separating out the electrical system so some things run on the inverter and some things don't?  Or did you just wire it right into the main breaker (in which case how do you run the hot water heater)?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

 

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 12:45 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For two people living permanently on am SM2K, we find in cool climates you need the following to avoid damage from condensation arising from high humidity.

 

1.  Always run the kitchen exhaust fan while using propane.

2.  Run at least two dehumidifiers permanently.  We have the Eva-Dry EDV-2200 with peltier technology, which is a bit of a joke and is not sufficient if people are living on the boat.  Don't recommend it.  We also have the DeLonghi DNC 65 with desiccant technology, highly recommended for low power use averaging about 50W, low noise, small size, and ability to keep dehumidifying even at low ambient temps when we are out and about.  Runs in the U.S. if you run it from your 50Hz inverter.

3.  Run the Eberspächer diesel heater at least once a day and for at least one hour.

4.  On any days with low ambient humidity, open all hatches and run fans.

5.  Install humidity monitors throughout the boat, and especially in the problem area on the berth above the batteries.  About $40 total.

6.  Open cabinet doors and rotate stored clothes as needed.

 

Cheers,

 

Peregrinus

SM2K N. 350

En route, Thermopylae to Skiathos

 

 

 

 

 


 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

I thought the USA was 110 volt??

Danny

On 18 August 2017 at 14:04 "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan,

Here in the USA you have 60 cycle 220-240 volts in all the outlets.

The water heater is a resistive device and doesn’t really care what frequency the electric is. The AC unit and chargers work on 50/60.

 

The dishwasher, Watermaker , and Washing Machine all work ONLY on  50 hz.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 1:14 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

 

 

Those are good ideas.  I used to have one of those Eva-Dry units and they are indeed a joke.  I had it for the summer though, not the winter.  It tends to be very dry here once the temperature goes below freezing.  My old boat had an Espar (Eberspacher), my new one does not.  That goes a long way towards keeping the boat dry because it exchanges air with the outside.  I think I'm going to try to heat with electric only this year rather than install one of those systems.  I also do not have a 50Hz inverter, but I'm sure I can find a similar dehumidifier that works at 60Hz.  I may also add a 50Hz inverter so I can run the washing machine.  Does anyone have experience separating out the electrical system so some things run on the inverter and some things don't?  Or did you just wire it right into the main breaker (in which case how do you run the hot water heater)?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

 

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 12:45 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For two people living permanently on am SM2K, we find in cool climates you need the following to avoid damage from condensation arising from high humidity.

 

1.  Always run the kitchen exhaust fan while using propane.

2.  Run at least two dehumidifiers permanently.  We have the Eva-Dry EDV-2200 with peltier technology, which is a bit of a joke and is not sufficient if people are living on the boat.  Don't recommend it.  We also have the DeLonghi DNC 65 with desiccant technology, highly recommended for low power use averaging about 50W, low noise, small size, and ability to keep dehumidifying even at low ambient temps when we are out and about.  Runs in the U.S. if you run it from your 50Hz inverter.

3.  Run the Eberspächer diesel heater at least once a day and for at least one hour.

4.  On any days with low ambient humidity, open all hatches and run fans.

5.  Install humidity monitors throughout the boat, and especially in the problem area on the berth above the batteries.  About $40 total.

6.  Open cabinet doors and rotate stored clothes as needed.

 

Cheers,

 

Peregrinus

SM2K N. 350

En route, Thermopylae to Skiathos

 

 

 

 

 


 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

eric freedman
 

Ryan,

Here in the USA you have 60 cycle 220-240 volts in all the outlets.

The water heater is a resistive device and doesn’t really care what frequency the electric is. The AC unit and chargers work on 50/60.

 

The dishwasher, Watermaker , and Washing Machine all work ONLY on  50 hz.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 1:14 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

 

 

Those are good ideas.  I used to have one of those Eva-Dry units and they are indeed a joke.  I had it for the summer though, not the winter.  It tends to be very dry here once the temperature goes below freezing.  My old boat had an Espar (Eberspacher), my new one does not.  That goes a long way towards keeping the boat dry because it exchanges air with the outside.  I think I'm going to try to heat with electric only this year rather than install one of those systems.  I also do not have a 50Hz inverter, but I'm sure I can find a similar dehumidifier that works at 60Hz.  I may also add a 50Hz inverter so I can run the washing machine.  Does anyone have experience separating out the electrical system so some things run on the inverter and some things don't?  Or did you just wire it right into the main breaker (in which case how do you run the hot water heater)?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

 

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 12:45 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For two people living permanently on am SM2K, we find in cool climates you need the following to avoid damage from condensation arising from high humidity.

 

1.  Always run the kitchen exhaust fan while using propane.

2.  Run at least two dehumidifiers permanently.  We have the Eva-Dry EDV-2200 with peltier technology, which is a bit of a joke and is not sufficient if people are living on the boat.  Don't recommend it.  We also have the DeLonghi DNC 65 with desiccant technology, highly recommended for low power use averaging about 50W, low noise, small size, and ability to keep dehumidifying even at low ambient temps when we are out and about.  Runs in the U.S. if you run it from your 50Hz inverter.

3.  Run the Eberspächer diesel heater at least once a day and for at least one hour.

4.  On any days with low ambient humidity, open all hatches and run fans.

5.  Install humidity monitors throughout the boat, and especially in the problem area on the berth above the batteries.  About $40 total.

6.  Open cabinet doors and rotate stored clothes as needed.

 

Cheers,

 

Peregrinus

SM2K N. 350

En route, Thermopylae to Skiathos

 

 

 

Re: Base for Jabsco Quiet Flush head Brojen

greatketch@...
 

I have not had to solve that particular problem, but it sounds like a rivnut might be an answer instead of a molly-bolt

Another creative solution, might be to get a sheet of 3/8" thick G10.  Epoxy it down on top of the existing fiberglass base.  If you go slow and are very careful with a sharp new tap you can drill and tap it.  It is strong enough to hold threads, and is non-corroding.  I have used it a lot as backing plates.  It usually comes in a light green color that is not horrible to the eye.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Gloucester, Mass


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 


Kent,

My thoughts are:
Is the tub empty?
Belt?
Motor?
Control panel?
Fill level switch?
Replace it because it is 20 years old?

But, I cannot recommend which of the above to start with. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Aug 17, 2017 19:26, "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Anyone have any thoughts on a Thompson Australe washer and dryer that doesn't spin anymore?

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Intermittent A/C Seawater Pump

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Ryan,

Don't get your panties twisted. 

Yes, I made a typo. 

It is microfarads, but it is also printed on the capacitor. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   


On Aug 17, 2017 18:35, "Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I'm confused, you two seem to be agreeing and yet you're saying different things. mF and µF differ by a factor of 1000!  m is the metric prefix for milli, i.e. 1/1,000. µ (often written u because it's easier to type) is the metric prefix for micro, i.e. 1/1,000,000. So which is it?

Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, USA

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 5:51 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Dean,

Yes, that 10 mf run capacitor is the most common failed part when the pump is doing what you say. Of course there could be other causes.

Mark Erdos makes a very good point about the best replacement for the pump.

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550







On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 3:19 PM, trifin@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

Bill, are you referring to the 10uF (10 microFarad) cap which is in the box on top of the pump?





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

karkauai
 

Anyone have any thoughts on a Thompson Australe washer and dryer that doesn't spin anymore?

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Intermittent A/C Seawater Pump

Ryan Meador
 

I'm confused, you two seem to be agreeing and yet you're saying different things. mF and µF differ by a factor of 1000!  m is the metric prefix for milli, i.e. 1/1,000. µ (often written u because it's easier to type) is the metric prefix for micro, i.e. 1/1,000,000. So which is it?

Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, USA

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 5:51 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Dean,

Yes, that 10 mf run capacitor is the most common failed part when the pump is doing what you say. Of course there could be other causes.

Mark Erdos makes a very good point about the best replacement for the pump.

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550







On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 3:19 PM, trifin@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Bill, are you referring to the 10uF (10 microFarad) cap which is in the box on top of the pump?




Base for Jabsco Quiet Flush head Brojen

karkauai
 

Hi all.
On my last passage, the base of my foreword Quiet Flush Jabsco head broke. Jabsco has changed the base and the old ones are no longer available. The new base doesn't have the outboard bolt holes to bolt it to the fiberglass pan, only 3 bolt holes on the perimeter of the base. The fore and aft holes line up with the old ones. The inboard hole is barely on the edge of the flat part of the cabin sole, I drilled it but found no backing plate to tap. There is no access without removing the fiberglass shower enclosure.

I'm thinking of cutting a hole in the fiberglass under the head, and epoxying a piece of stainless underneath where the inboard hole is, then drilling and tapping it.

I might be able to drill a big enough hole to insert a Molly bolt, but not sure I can get it to tighten up with nothing to hold it under the flooring.

Has anyone else dealt with this problem? Solution?

Is there any down side to cutting a fist-sized hole in the shower pan?

I could move the head outboard a centimeter or so to give myself a flat surface to work with, no more as the macerator motor won't allow it. Any thoughts about that?

Does anyone know the configuration of the backing plates under the original holes?

Thank you for any thoughts.

Kent
SM243
Kristy
St Michaels, MD, USA

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Pat,

In my experience, "Kryptonite" flex cable comes in several thicknesses and the one that is between 3/8" and 7/16" is difficult to cut. The thieves usually steal the best available dinghy with the easiest-to-cut cable.

But, if you have a nice dinghy and/or a stupid crook, you may lose your dinghy no matter what you do. BTW, most crooks hate 4 cycle Hondas, and love 15+ hp 2 cycle engines.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School  http://amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970








On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 3:43 PM, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thanks all, it sounds like everyone is using chain, which is heavy and can be cut , I was hoping someone had discovered a flexible cable that was difficult to cut . I guess its chain and keeping the insurance premiums paid.

Thanks Again,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 12:42 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Good morning Pat,

My solution is probably extreme.

Last year I purchased small length of 3/8 chain and 1/2 chains to secure dinghy and bicycles.

Then I realized the eyes on the dinghy to secure it are about 10 mm made of aluminium, so they will be cut quicker than the chain, so I use the 3/8 chain.

I use the 1/2 inch chain to secure my bicycles (around cleat, pole, etc.).
When people see its size of the chain they smile (many take pictures).
I assume/hope that a thief (a lazy person to start with) will be discouraged of cutting off such chain and look for another victim.
For the lock I use the German Made ABUS Granit which are Level 10
https://www.abus.com/eng/Mobile-Security/Marine/Padlocks/GRANIT-37-55-S-038-S

All the chains can also be linked together using shackles for my 2nd anchor.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
IGY Simpson Bay Marina, St Maarten, NA

--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 8/17/17, sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 7:46 AM


 









The last time we were in the Caribbean
I secured my dinghy with a cable that was encased in gray
plastic . I think it was called Kryptonite , I was told by a
friend and where I bought it , that it was very difficult to
cut. Well I just cut it very easily with a very short
handled cable cutter. When we go ashore , I like to think
that are dinghy will be there when we get back . So does
anyone have a suggestion as to the most secure way to secure
a dinghy. Nothing is bullet proof , but I want to get as
close as possible.Thanks,
PatSM Shenanigans









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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Intermittent A/C Seawater Pump

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Dean,

Yes, that 10 mf run capacitor is the most common failed part when the pump is doing what you say. Of course there could be other causes.

Mark Erdos makes a very good point about the best replacement for the pump.

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970







On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 3:19 PM, trifin@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill, are you referring to the 10uF (10 microFarad) cap which is in the box on top of the pump?



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Pat,

I think all the locking methods only stop the impulse thefts. If someone sets out to steel a dinghy and comes equipped they're going to get one no matter what we do. One time we were at the Annapolis boat show. We came back and found ours shifted but tied up again. The Mercury 4 stroke outboard we had was a bit hard to start and if you got it wrong it had a kick back that would break your arm. Might have saved us a new dinghy  and left a thief with a sore arm.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 18 August 2017 at 07:43 "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks all, it sounds like everyone is using chain, which is heavy and can be cut , I was hoping someone had discovered a flexible cable that was difficult to cut . I guess its chain and keeping the insurance premiums paid.

Thanks Again,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 12:42 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Good morning Pat,

My solution is probably extreme.

Last year I purchased small length of 3/8 chain and 1/2 chains to secure dinghy and bicycles.

Then I realized the eyes on the dinghy to secure it are about 10 mm made of aluminium, so they will be cut quicker than the chain, so I use the 3/8 chain.

I use the 1/2 inch chain to secure my bicycles (around cleat, pole, etc.).
When people see its size of the chain they smile (many take pictures).
I assume/hope that a thief (a lazy person to start with) will be discouraged of cutting off such chain and look for another victim.
For the lock I use the German Made ABUS Granit which are Level 10
https://www.abus.com/eng/Mobile-Security/Marine/Padlocks/GRANIT-37-55-S-038-S

All the chains can also be linked together using shackles for my 2nd anchor.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
IGY Simpson Bay Marina, St Maarten, NA

--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 8/17/17, sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 7:46 AM


 









The last time we were in the Caribbean
I secured my dinghy with a cable that was encased in gray
plastic . I think it was called Kryptonite , I was told by a
friend and where I bought it , that it was very difficult to
cut. Well I just cut it very easily with a very short
handled cable cutter. When we go ashore , I like to think
that are dinghy will be there when we get back . So does
anyone have a suggestion as to the most secure way to secure
a dinghy. Nothing is bullet proof , but I want to get as
close as possible.Thanks,
PatSM Shenanigans









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Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

Jose Venegas
 

Ian,   It sounds very much like my problem.  Fortunately I was able to see the flooding and stop the machine, which stop the flood of water.  It thus may be that in my case the valve is OK but the water level sensor is faulty and the pump is not working.   I just received a new pump and will take the thing apart this weekend.  
In your case it seem the problem was intermittent but in my case it flooded twice.  

I will report my experience

thanks a lot for sharing your experience.

Jose

SM2K 278 Boston

Low pressure pump for the 160 liter Watermaker

eric freedman
 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

Patrick McAneny
 

Thanks all, it sounds like everyone is using chain, which is heavy and can be cut , I was hoping someone had discovered a flexible cable that was difficult to cut . I guess its chain and keeping the insurance premiums paid.
Thanks Again,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 12:42 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Good morning Pat,

My solution is probably extreme.

Last year I purchased small length of 3/8 chain and 1/2 chains to secure dinghy and bicycles.

Then I realized the eyes on the dinghy to secure it are about 10 mm made of aluminium, so they will be cut quicker than the chain, so I use the 3/8 chain.

I use the 1/2 inch chain to secure my bicycles (around cleat, pole, etc.).
When people see its size of the chain they smile (many take pictures).
I assume/hope that a thief (a lazy person to start with) will be discouraged of cutting off such chain and look for another victim.
For the lock I use the German Made ABUS Granit which are Level 10
https://www.abus.com/eng/Mobile-Security/Marine/Padlocks/GRANIT-37-55-S-038-S

All the chains can also be linked together using shackles for my 2nd anchor.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
IGY Simpson Bay Marina, St Maarten, NA

--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 8/17/17, sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 7:46 AM


 









The last time we were in the Caribbean
I secured my dinghy with a cable that was encased in gray
plastic . I think it was called Kryptonite , I was told by a
friend and where I bought it , that it was very difficult to
cut. Well I just cut it very easily with a very short
handled cable cutter. When we go ashore , I like to think
that are dinghy will be there when we get back . So does
anyone have a suggestion as to the most secure way to secure
a dinghy. Nothing is bullet proof , but I want to get as
close as possible.Thanks,
PatSM Shenanigans









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Re: Intermittent A/C Seawater Pump

Dean Gillies
 

Bill, are you referring to the 10uF (10 microFarad) cap which is in the box on top of the pump?

Re: winter liveaboard?

greatketch@...
 

I lived on a boat for 15 years in cool San Francisco, which pales in comparison to winter in Boston.  But I'll second the comment that moisture is the enemy.  Every breath you take adds water to the air, and if that water is not removed, it will condense on the cold hull and cause no ends of problems.

The only way to get keep condensation from forming is to remove the water.  Either with a dehumidifier or through ventilation--or both.  The problem is the colder it gets, the less ventilation you want because it is... well... cold!

I had a in-cabin heater, a Dickenson diesel fuel model that was great at keeping things warm and dry on a 40 foot boat down to 20 degrees or so.  It would do the main saloon on a SM, but not the whole boat in Boston temperatures.  It's also a major installation project.

Some other simple hints...  
  • Shower at the gym or at work if you can.  Showers add HUGELY to the water load in the air. 
  • When cooking, keep the pots covered, and simmer as low as possible.  
  • Get an electric mattress pad.  That and a fluffy duvet will give you a sense of well being in a blizzard.  
  • Have a plan of action about what you will do if there is an electrical outage when the temperature is well below freezing.
  • Be really careful on deck when it is frosty!  It is VERY slippery.
Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Gloucester, Maine

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: finding LED bulbs for overhead lights

Mark Erdos
 

Here is a link to LED bulbs that are G4 bases 24v that we are using on Cream Puff:

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B014XLDY1S/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

and

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JQJSL20/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 11:42 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: finding LED bulbs for overhead lights

 

 

Thanks for the tips.  You've given me a bunch of good ideas.  Also, I contacted boatlamps.co.uk and they knew exactly what I was talking about.  They recommend this bulb, which looks like it might work... I'll have to measure carefully to see if the fixture can accomodate the diameter.  It seems a little silly to me to waste the light that would be pointing up, but the bulbs are in theory brighter than the halogens they're replacing, so it might be OK.  Also I learned that the largest fixture on my boat, the one above the salon table, has the pins oriented straight out of the ceiling (so it would take a back-pin LED bulb).

 

Thanks,

Ryan

SM 233 Iteration

Boston, USA

 

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 11:24 AM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello Ryan,

 

I converted all bulbs on hull № 350 to LED in 2013.  I faced the same problem as you have.

 

For my overhead lights, the two-pin socket which comes from the Amel factory aligning vertically consists of a brown or black bakelite terminal with the electric wires coming in the back and the two pins exposed to the center of the light assembly.

 

This bakelite terminal is held in place by a little screw.  The bakelite terminal is elongated in such a way that when the little screw tightens, it automatically rotates the pins to the factory vertical position; i.e., if you loosen the screw, rotate the bakelite terminal 90°, and try to tighten the screw, it will inevitably rotate the bakelite  terminal back to the Amel factory position with the pins aligned vertically.

 

In 2013, no suitable LED existed with vertically aligned pins, much less in the warm light variety we required, and which proved very hard to find.

 

So I took an abrasive tip on a dremel, loosened the screw, pulled bakelite terminal so I had one or two inches of electric wire exposed (for ease of work), and wore down the Amel factory elongation on each bakelite terminal.  Sometimes upon retightening the screw the base still rotated a bit so the LED was not perfectly horizontal, but frankly, this does not impact light distribution in any perceptible way.  One or two of mine are crooked enough that one edge of the flat disk LED may be touching the diffuser glass, but I don't think anyone has ever noticed.

 

It takes a bit of time.  And I ruined one of the LEDs in the process of installing, but so far, only one LED has burned out, just a week or two ago.

 

Cheerio,

 

Peregrinus

SM2000 № 350 (2002)

Underway, Thermopylae to Sciathus

 

 

 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

greatketch@...
 

Just as an extra tiny obstacle in the path of the bad guys, I always take the kill switch clip with me when I leave the dinghy at the dock.  Somebody could always tow it away, but it's all about making your dinghy a bit harder to take or less interesting than the one next to it.

There are all kinds of creative things you can do to make an outboard un-friendly to a stranger.  Something like reversing the fuel hose.  Unlikely to ever be noticed by someone trying to make a quick getaway, but the engine will only run for a few minutes on the fuel in the carb, then stop and not restart.

We use a cable lock, mostly because the attachment to the hull is the weak point and don't really expect chain would add a lot to a deterrent.  The cable lock we use is from Seattle Sports, sold as a kayak lock.  It is long and adjustable with an integrated lock.  So far, at least, it has been holding up in the salt water--always tough for any lock.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Gloucester, Mass

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Down wind sail configuration

smiles bernard
 

Thanks Bill 
That's great
All the very best
Miles


On 17 Aug 2017, at 11:33, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Miles,


I do not have a Maramu Manual, but maybe the Super Maramu manual will help.


Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970









On Wed, Aug 16, 2017 at 5:41 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
Miles,

Read your manual...it is very straightforward. Let me know if you do not have a manual.


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970