Date   

Speaking of temperatures and alarms

greatketch@...
 

Has anyone rigged a thermostat to run a blower when the engine (or genset) are not running, but the engine room is really hot?  Typically our engine room gets quite hot AFTER the main engine has been shut down, the blowers stop, and the heat soaks out of the block.


It gets hot enough it starts to approach the upper specification temperatures for some of the electrical gear.


I have a couple ideas on how to go about it, but maybe someone else has had a better idea...


Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Back Creek, Annapolis, MD


Re: length of screws for cleats

greatketch@...
 

I know that Amel used "Damade" brand cleats on the mast, or at least an exact copy of them.  Maybe they used the same brand on the deck. At least the superficial appearance matches.

Budget Marine carries them...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Back Creek, Annapolis, MD


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Bob,

I can answer one of your questions...

I suspect that Amel used 12VDC because that is what the engine uses. They could have used 24VDC, but that would require relays, complications, and one more potential failure with absolutely no gain. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Oct 5, 2017 03:47, "rossidesigngroup@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thanks everybody! BTW those horror stories REALLY reinforce that this could be a good thing to do.  In addition to melted lift mufflers I am suspecting that it can also help prevent engine damage due to overheating--seems like there are many cases where the engine is damaged before the high fluid temp alarm sounds.


Agree with both Bills on not needing it for the generator.   Bill Kinney--I (finally) just put a V meter to it and indeed the supply to the blowers on our year is 12V.  I recall reading this before and I am assuming that Amel did this to prolong the life of the blowers but I am curious as to why. 

I will probably mount the indicator (round) next to the voltage and temp gauge next to the diesel panel.  

There are 2 versions of the sensor:  I think I will use the sensor that fastens on the neck of the muffler rather than the hose once I confirm the muffler model.  

Does anyone have the model number of the plastic Vetus used on the Yanmars?  This will save me having to remove it before ordering.

I will get the alarm and sensor this winter while we are back in the US--and do the installation when we return to Malta in late March--so if anyone does an installation please report to the group!  And again, thank you.

Bob, KAIMI SM429
 


length of screws for cleats

Leopold Hauer
 

Hi everyone,

I had to buy new bow side cleats. To get  screws for them I should  know the thickness of the deck  on the side area of the bow. Does anybody know?


The new cleats are from SVB, but they are not exactly the same than the old ones. Amel doesn't have them any more ( SM hull 69). Would  there be any other place who sells the original cleats?


Thanks for your advice,


Leo

Yin Yang SM 69

(at present not on the boat)


Re: Vetus Alarm

rossirossix4
 

Thanks everybody! BTW those horror stories REALLY reinforce that this could be a good thing to do.  In addition to melted lift mufflers I am suspecting that it can also help prevent engine damage due to overheating--seems like there are many cases where the engine is damaged before the high fluid temp alarm sounds.

Agree with both Bills on not needing it for the generator.   Bill Kinney--I (finally) just put a V meter to it and indeed the supply to the blowers on our year is 12V.  I recall reading this before and I am assuming that Amel did this to prolong the life of the blowers but I am curious as to why. 

I will probably mount the indicator (round) next to the voltage and temp gauge next to the diesel panel.  

There are 2 versions of the sensor:  I think I will use the sensor that fastens on the neck of the muffler rather than the hose once I confirm the muffler model.  

Does anyone have the model number of the plastic Vetus used on the Yanmars?  This will save me having to remove it before ordering.

I will get the alarm and sensor this winter while we are back in the US--and do the installation when we return to Malta in late March--so if anyone does an installation please report to the group!  And again, thank you.

Bob, KAIMI SM429
 


Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

Jose Venegas
 

I found and fixed the problem!!!

 

Last Saturday while it rained, I decided to open the beast and examine its guts.  I first I removed the forward (bow) cover and changed the pump. It was a piece of cake.   However, after checking the old pump I realized that that was not the problem.  Next, I removed the aft (stern)  panel and there it was, a small slit on the black rubber tube that brings the water pressure lelvel signal to the water level switch.  (left upper corner)  It turns out the tube ran between the metal cover sheet and the iron weight which, over time slowly abraded the rubber tube finally creating a small crack that allowed air to escape as the water level increased.  So, when trying to refill the drum, the washer kept  adding water until it began to escape down into the floor.  

 

The best solution would have been to change the tube but I did not have the proper size.  Instead, I cut off the abraded piece and replace it with a piece of rigid plastic tube that fitted well in both ends.  To avoid the problem in the future, I changed the path of the tube to behind the iron weight so that it would not be abrading between two moving surfaces.  I will be uploading the pix.

 

The test was perfect and now I have a spare water pump.

 

Thank you all for the suggestions and I hope this will help anyone in the future before they move to replace the washer.

 

Jose Venegas

Ipanema SM2K, 278


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine exhaust hull fitting and copper water lines

eric freedman
 

I would try Rust Bullet,

That stuff is amazing. It is available in small cans .

I can will fix you up for a very very long time. Used by the US Navy.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 9:28 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine exhaust hull fitting and copper water lines

 

 

Two part epoxy paint, maybe 4 coats one after the other once the paint is tacky. Of course, clean first. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

 

On Oct 4, 2017 20:22, "john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

[Attachment(s) from john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners] included below]

When I bought my SM last December the surveyor caught evidence of a small water leak under the engine exhaust hose where it is attached to the hull.  He was deeply concerned that the hose was failing and exhaust fumes could be dangerous.  We didn’t see and significant water or fumes.   I bought a new hose, but the job kept getting postponed.  I’m now at a sheltered marina with almost no wave action and the temperature is perfect this week so I thought this was a great opportunity to eliminate that one job I have been dreading.

 

 

As we know the exhaust on the Amels is a bit funky.  On my boat the hose does not attach directly to the hull.  In fact at the hull there is nothing to clamp onto…at least not that I can see so far.  What I have is a stainless steel insert that fits snugly into a fiberglass stub at the waterline.  There is no flapper valve inside this insert.  The exhaust hose goes inside the wider end of the insert which is siliconed and pushed into the hull fitting.  My hull fitting/hose/insert were all coated in silicone.   To remove the hose I simply disconnected the rope hangers and pulled.  It was a good pull, but not super hard and the hose and insert disconnected from the hull.  On deck I did the same to remove the inert from the hose.    I am going to look into fabricating a brace to lock that hose/insert in place better than the rope hanger set up.

I found the insert had a small patch of pitting type of corrosion and was the source of the leak. The hose was also in poor condition as the surveyor suspected, I was able to tear it by hand. 

 

My vessel was originally delivered from Amel with a Perkins engine, but she was repowered with a TMD 22 by the original owner many years ago.  I have read here that Volvo recommends a 90mm exhaust hose for the TMD22 instead of the 75mm that was used on the Perkins.  I had 90mm hose so I think the insert, I found was the method used during the repower to increase the hose size.  I am repairing the insert and will reinstall it with the new hose.  I attached photos so others with early hull numbers can see what is hidden in that aft corner.

 

The concern I have now is the two fresh water lines that run under the exhaust fitting.  They are copper and where the sea water leak occurred, there is flaky blue corrosion.  Does anyone have any suggestions on how to address the copper corrosion without replacing the lines?   I don’t want to cut the lines because they are in one of the hardest places to access, and not someplace I want to bring a soldering torch.  I am hoping someone knows some sort of chemical treatment to stop the corrosion and protect the lines. 

 

                      Regards,  John

 

John Clark

SV Annie  SM 37

Morehead City

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine exhaust hull fitting and copper water lines [3 Attachments]

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Two part epoxy paint, maybe 4 coats one after the other once the paint is tacky. Of course, clean first. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Oct 4, 2017 20:22, "john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners] included below]

When I bought my SM last December the surveyor caught evidence of a small water leak under the engine exhaust hose where it is attached to the hull.  He was deeply concerned that the hose was failing and exhaust fumes could be dangerous.  We didn’t see and significant water or fumes.   I bought a new hose, but the job kept getting postponed.  I’m now at a sheltered marina with almost no wave action and the temperature is perfect this week so I thought this was a great opportunity to eliminate that one job I have been dreading.

 

 

As we know the exhaust on the Amels is a bit funky.  On my boat the hose does not attach directly to the hull.  In fact at the hull there is nothing to clamp onto…at least not that I can see so far.  What I have is a stainless steel insert that fits snugly into a fiberglass stub at the waterline.  There is no flapper valve inside this insert.  The exhaust hose goes inside the wider end of the insert which is siliconed and pushed into the hull fitting.  My hull fitting/hose/insert were all coated in silicone.   To remove the hose I simply disconnected the rope hangers and pulled.  It was a good pull, but not super hard and the hose and insert disconnected from the hull.  On deck I did the same to remove the inert from the hose.    I am going to look into fabricating a brace to lock that hose/insert in place better than the rope hanger set up.

I found the insert had a small patch of pitting type of corrosion and was the source of the leak. The hose was also in poor condition as the surveyor suspected, I was able to tear it by hand. 

 

My vessel was originally delivered from Amel with a Perkins engine, but she was repowered with a TMD 22 by the original owner many years ago.  I have read here that Volvo recommends a 90mm exhaust hose for the TMD22 instead of the 75mm that was used on the Perkins.  I had 90mm hose so I think the insert, I found was the method used during the repower to increase the hose size.  I am repairing the insert and will reinstall it with the new hose.  I attached photos so others with early hull numbers can see what is hidden in that aft corner.

 

The concern I have now is the two fresh water lines that run under the exhaust fitting.  They are copper and where the sea water leak occurred, there is flaky blue corrosion.  Does anyone have any suggestions on how to address the copper corrosion without replacing the lines?   I don’t want to cut the lines because they are in one of the hardest places to access, and not someplace I want to bring a soldering torch.  I am hoping someone knows some sort of chemical treatment to stop the corrosion and protect the lines. 


                      Regards,  John


John Clark

SV Annie  SM 37

Morehead City



Re: Olivier

Paul Osterberg
 

Oliver will be in Georgetown Sassafras the 12 of Oktober 
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259 Annapolis 


Engine exhaust hull fitting and copper water lines

John Clark
 

When I bought my SM last December the surveyor caught evidence of a small water leak under the engine exhaust hose where it is attached to the hull.  He was deeply concerned that the hose was failing and exhaust fumes could be dangerous.  We didn’t see and significant water or fumes.   I bought a new hose, but the job kept getting postponed.  I’m now at a sheltered marina with almost no wave action and the temperature is perfect this week so I thought this was a great opportunity to eliminate that one job I have been dreading.

 

 

As we know the exhaust on the Amels is a bit funky.  On my boat the hose does not attach directly to the hull.  In fact at the hull there is nothing to clamp onto…at least not that I can see so far.  What I have is a stainless steel insert that fits snugly into a fiberglass stub at the waterline.  There is no flapper valve inside this insert.  The exhaust hose goes inside the wider end of the insert which is siliconed and pushed into the hull fitting.  My hull fitting/hose/insert were all coated in silicone.   To remove the hose I simply disconnected the rope hangers and pulled.  It was a good pull, but not super hard and the hose and insert disconnected from the hull.  On deck I did the same to remove the inert from the hose.    I am going to look into fabricating a brace to lock that hose/insert in place better than the rope hanger set up.

I found the insert had a small patch of pitting type of corrosion and was the source of the leak. The hose was also in poor condition as the surveyor suspected, I was able to tear it by hand. 

 

My vessel was originally delivered from Amel with a Perkins engine, but she was repowered with a TMD 22 by the original owner many years ago.  I have read here that Volvo recommends a 90mm exhaust hose for the TMD22 instead of the 75mm that was used on the Perkins.  I had 90mm hose so I think the insert, I found was the method used during the repower to increase the hose size.  I am repairing the insert and will reinstall it with the new hose.  I attached photos so others with early hull numbers can see what is hidden in that aft corner.

 

The concern I have now is the two fresh water lines that run under the exhaust fitting.  They are copper and where the sea water leak occurred, there is flaky blue corrosion.  Does anyone have any suggestions on how to address the copper corrosion without replacing the lines?   I don’t want to cut the lines because they are in one of the hardest places to access, and not someplace I want to bring a soldering torch.  I am hoping someone knows some sort of chemical treatment to stop the corrosion and protect the lines. 


                      Regards,  John


John Clark

SV Annie  SM 37

Morehead City



Olivier

eric freedman
 

Do you know where Olivier will be on the east coast ?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 6:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

 

 

I forgot to include his email address: olivierbeaute@...

He will be on the east coast of the USA next week.

Mark McGovern
SM#440 Cara


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

eric freedman
 

John,

That is exactly what happened to me. The engine overheat buzzer never went on.

Fortunately I had a spare muffler. Mine is now metal.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 2:19 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

 

 

Last March when we left Martinique shortly after purchasing our SM, unbeknownst to us, the seawater inlet hose leading to the seawater pump on the engine developed a crack allowing the pump to suck air instead of water.  I discovered this during the passage when the wind died and I started the engine.  After starting the engine, I immediately thought it sounded wrong….more like a Harley Davidson than a sedate sailing yacht. I opened the engine hatch and found smoke everywhere and smell of hot rubber and plastic, of course this happened in the middle of the night.  Obviously I shut down the engine and woke up the rest of the crew.  We investigated and found no SW flow, checked impeller, found it trashed.  We replaced the impeller, still no flow.  Checked some more and found the hose issue.  Fixed the hose, got water flow….right onto the floor of the engine room!  Found that the plastic Vetus muffler had melted…well by then wind had picked up and I said we will deal with this in the morning and I went to bed.  Next morning I took the muffler off and looked at it closely with my “McGuver glasses.”  I got a piece of plywood and a tube of 5200….and a big bunch of hose clamps and patched over the melted portion, reinstalled and presto back in business before lunchtime.  We got a new muffler in St. Martin , but I kept the old patched one as a spare!  This failure happened so quick, less than 2 minutes, that the engine never overheated.  The only indication was that the exhaust sounded wrong.  I will eventually install an exhaust temp alarm, for this exact reason.   I understand that Amel installed stainless steel mufflers, but the hoses and other fittings can also be damaged quickly when there is no cooling water in the exhaust.

 

(FYI: My SM was repowered by her first owner changing out the original Perkins for the Volvo TMD22, I expect that was when the plastic Vetus was installed.)

 

John Clark

SV Annie SM 37

Morehead City NC


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

eric freedman
 

Bill,

The Borel unit has saved my bacon twice.

You can order it in either the 12 volt or 24 volt version. . If you do ask for a 20 foot length of wire on the unit. I have mine mounted on the port side of the companionway next to the Amel nameplate.

The unit is so simple you do not have to make it more complicated. There is a thermocouple that mounts to the exhaust hose. When the hose is not too hot the thermocouple is open and draws no current. Thus the alarm will not sound.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 10:23 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

 

 

 

Bob,

 

There is already a 12V supply that is active only when the main engine is on...  it runs the blowers.

 

I'll second the what Bill R said about the Onan generator already being protected this way.  Doubling up really doesn't buy you anything except more wires and complexity. But a useful addition to the main drive engine.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Back Creek, Annapolis, MD



---In amelyachtowners@..., <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote :

Has anyone installed a Vetus exhaust temp alarm?  http://www.defender.com/pdf/xh_exhaust_alarm.pdf   https://www.vetus.com/en/search/?q=exhaust+alarm  I know owners have used a Borel alarm.... but this seems to be a good idea also and the price is right.  It has a sound and visual alarm and Vetus says 2 sensors could be attached to one unit so an owner could protect both the engine and generator.  There are 12V and 24V versions and I am curious as to whether there is a convenient way to wire a 12V so it is activated only when either the generator or engine is operating.

 

Bob, KAIMI On the hard in Malta

 


Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Thanks everyone, Gary


Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

mfmcgovern@...
 

olivierbeaute@ gmail dot com


Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

mfmcgovern@...
 

I forgot to include his email address: olivierbeaute@...

He will be on the east coast of the USA next week.

Mark McGovern
SM#440 Cara


Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

mfmcgovern@...
 

Olivier BEAUTE / ATLANTIC YACHT SURVEY
10 allée du Bout dehors
17000 LA ROCHELLE
Tel: +33 546 522 147 Mob: +33 674 028 243
http://atlanticyachtsurvey.com


Olivier Beaute Contact Information

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Does someone have Olivier's contact information?


Thanks,  Gary Silver   SM #335


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

Porter McRoberts
 

You guys are awesome!!

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Oct 4, 2017, at 5:13 PM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi John,

We had same meltdown of Vetus plastic muffler last year. Cause was worn drive adapter on cam shaft that turns in the slot of the sea water pump (Perkins M50). Fixed similar to you with pieces of neoprene, 4200, a piece of Katherine's plastic cutting board and lashing with a Spanish windlass. Had spare water pump. 
Yes, surprising how quickly the Vetus plastic melts with no water flow - definitely an argument to have an exhaust temp sensor as waiting for the engine overheat alarm was too long for both of us.
Stay cool,
Craig Briggs, SN#68 Sangaris, underway south of Coinjock, VA


Re: Vetus Alarm

Craig Briggs
 

Hi John,
We had same meltdown of Vetus plastic muffler last year. Cause was worn drive adapter on cam shaft that turns in the slot of the sea water pump (Perkins M50). Fixed similar to you with pieces of neoprene, 4200, a piece of Katherine's plastic cutting board and lashing with a Spanish windlass. Had spare water pump. 
Yes, surprising how quickly the Vetus plastic melts with no water flow - definitely an argument to have an exhaust temp sensor as waiting for the engine overheat alarm was too long for both of us.
Stay cool,
Craig Briggs, SN#68 Sangaris, underway south of Coinjock, VA