Date   

main sail furler gear box maramu 1986

Philippe Belloir
 

It s an oil leak from the bottom of the gear
box. I found some informations how to fix it.
But I can t take the gear box out of the mast... Help!!!
Thank you all of you,
Philippe


Re: Mango fuel filter question

James Alton
 

Arlo,

   This looks like the same CAV filter used on my 1987 Maramu. Here is a link showing the CAV filter for comparison to yours:https://www.parts4engines.com/perkins-4236-fuel-filter-assembly/  To change the filter you remove the rusty center bolt at the top of the housing and the lower components fall away.  You will want a container and lots of paper towels under the assembly during the filter change since the bowl is probably full of fuel.  On my boat, the fuel is gravity feed so very important to also turn off the shutoff valve at the tank!  There are 3 rubber sealing rings to change that should come with the replacement filter.  You need to be really careful to insure that the upper gasket is properly inserted and not rolled over etc. or you will have a leak.  The NAPA #3166 fits my filter assembly.

Best of luck,

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Sep 14, 2020, at 12:38 PM, Arlo <svplanb@...> wrote:

Hello there. So I am.looking to change my fuel filters (routine service) and I  have no idea what the original Amel fuel system used for this filter. I have already changed the one on the engine but not this little gem...I have a Mango. Any ideas ? It is attached to the tank selector valve <20200914_094926.jpg><20200914_094918.jpg>


Re: Anchor Chain

James Alton
 

Nick,

   I would be looking at about $4,400 USD  (I found a US supplier)  for 300’ of the 8mm which is a little less than 2.5 times the cost of the Aqua7 grade 70 that we are using now.  (We are using the grade 70 8mm because we can fit 100 meters without issues of knocking down a chain castle as the chain piles up in the locker.  The grade 70 8mm is also supposed to be as strong as the 10mm G40 we replaced and puts less weight in the bow)    As you point out the Cromox is amazingly strong for being stainless,  maybe 7 percent weaker than the Aqua7 quite a surprise to me.   So if the Cromox was good for 10 years and I replace my Aqua7 every 5 years instead of regalvanizing the cost difference would be about $688 for 10 years or an additional $69 per year if I have my math correct.   A replacement every 5 years would be a $507 per year premium though I suspect that there would be some resell value in 5 year old Cromox chain that could help reduce the cost differential. My primary interest in the Cromox stems from the comments that seem to indicate that it runs more smoothly  (reliably)  through the Gypsy but I do not have any actual experience with stainless chain on a gypsy.   I can tell you that once my Aqua7 developed some surface corrosion and roughness that it began to occasionally skip/slip on the brand new Gypsy supplied with the chain.  At any rate the brand new G7 chain seemed to run smoother when it was new and smooth and I assume that the stainless chain would remain pretty smooth over the years.  I view the anchor windlass as one of the most dangerous components of the boat so if it is possible to improve the safety of the operator for $69 per year that sounds worthwhile.  Can anyone that has used the stainless and the galvanized chains please comment on whether they see a difference in how the chains run on their windlass?  My primary concern about the Cromox is the potential for crevice corrosion that could cause a failure.  I have been searching for evidence of failures on the Web and so far have not come across any but perhaps there are not a lot of people using stainless chain?  I note that pretty much all of the anchor swivels used are now stainless.  I understand that the German manufacturer for Cromox can inspect, treat, repair if needed.  I think that they can also issue a new warranty for their Cromox after such an inspection though I have not looked into all of the details.  I also note that Cromox chains are also sold for overhead lifting operations which could indicate the reliability must be pretty good to get this certification.  I will stay with my galvanized steel for now but would like to learn more about the Cromox option, thanks for any input.

Thanks,

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Sep 14, 2020, at 12:19 PM, ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

I get the attraction of Cromox;

No rust

Stacks nicely,

Clean 

the 10mm chain has a MBL of 10197 Kg, so strong too

BUT one hundred meters would cost about £6115 (Jimmy Greene) including VAT but not delivery.




Accastillage Diffusion, a French chandlery with outlets all over France and one in Lanzarotte( where I had 100m delivered at no charge as it came with the regular container shipped from France) 

sells Grade 70 galvanised chain made by  Chaineries Limousines with a MBL (breaking load) 11217 Kg  for Euro 1390 i.e. about £1200.

(Grade 40 has a MBL of only 5000 Kg!! so it is twice as strong as the 40 and even stronger than the Cromox, but at less than 20% of the cost….




How long will the Cromox last? It is really hard to say….5-10 years sounds about right. Will it stretch? I do not think so. So there will be no way of knowing when it needs replacing….maybe it is like standing rigging and will last 12 years…I do not know.

How long will the galvanised grade 70 last?….after five years it will probably be looking a bit rusty. One can inspect the links for elongation. One can have it re-galvanised though apparently this will reduce the strength very slightly, by maybe 10%. 

Of course it is not easy to get re-galvanising done nor is it easy to buy grade 70 chain…

Nick (now back in the UK)
Amelia (ashore in Leros)
AML 54-019






Re: Anchor sizing

Teun BAAS
 

Morning Bryce,

 

Thanks for the info; this is indeed cheaper while still in QLD.

I see that BURLEIGH HEADS is 38 KM south of COOMERA – I can surely buy from them and pick up; especially since TBWY makes cars and little pick up trucks available for free to the boats staying in their marina/yard.

 

You just saved me AU$1,310 😊 When I ever make it back and you are around I buy you dinner.

 

Thanks.

 

Best Regards Teun

A 54, 2009 #128

September 14, 2020 09:53:32

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bryce Procter via groups.io
Sent: Monday, September 14, 2020 00:28
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Anchor sizing

 

Hi Tuen,

 

Price for 100m Cromox Grade 60 10mm short link $8690 AUD ($6332 USD). 

This is from Bridco Qld Australia, I am also checking to see if it is available in Malaysia which is where my boat is currently moored.

I have a container being shipped from here to Malaysia next month so freight from here won't be an issue if I need to buy here.

 

Cheers

 

Bryce

SM 2K #467


Re: Mango fuel filter question

Arlo
 

Engine is a perkins 4.236.


Mango fuel filter question

Arlo
 

Hello there. So I am.looking to change my fuel filters (routine service) and I  have no idea what the original Amel fuel system used for this filter. I have already changed the one on the engine but not this little gem...I have a Mango. Any ideas ? It is attached to the tank selector valve


Anchor Chain

ngtnewington Newington
 

I get the attraction of Cromox;

No rust

Stacks nicely,

Clean 

the 10mm chain has a MBL of 10197 Kg, so strong too

BUT one hundred meters would cost about £6115 (Jimmy Greene) including VAT but not delivery.




Accastillage Diffusion, a French chandlery with outlets all over France and one in Lanzarotte( where I had 100m delivered at no charge as it came with the regular container shipped from France) 

sells Grade 70 galvanised chain made by  Chaineries Limousines with a MBL (breaking load) 11217 Kg  for Euro 1390 i.e. about £1200.

(Grade 40 has a MBL of only 5000 Kg!! so it is twice as strong as the 40 and even stronger than the Cromox, but at less than 20% of the cost….




How long will the Cromox last? It is really hard to say….5-10 years sounds about right. Will it stretch? I do not think so. So there will be no way of knowing when it needs replacing….maybe it is like standing rigging and will last 12 years…I do not know.

How long will the galvanised grade 70 last?….after five years it will probably be looking a bit rusty. One can inspect the links for elongation. One can have it re-galvanised though apparently this will reduce the strength very slightly, by maybe 10%. 

Of course it is not easy to get re-galvanising done nor is it easy to buy grade 70 chain…

Nick (now back in the UK)
Amelia (ashore in Leros)
AML 54-019





Re: change standing rigging SM

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi;

We used ACMO France that supplies AMEL. They have all the information on all the boats originally supplied and were very professional and responsive. The rigging arrived in good condition and to exact measurements. If there are any upgrades that AMEL may have done throughout the years, they are aware of them and will ship per the latest design. I would recommend them. The price for the total rigging materials was in the 12-13K Euros of the A54. I do not know the pricing for the SM. If you are in the Med, I would highly recommend Nicky Sammut for the installation. He is based out of Malta, is fast and professional and will travel. Good luck.

Happy Sailing;


Mohammad and Aty
B&B Kokomo
AMEL 54 #099

-----Original Message-----
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Seckin Barlas via groups.io
Sent: Monday, September 14, 2020 8:19 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] change standing rigging SM

Dear Friends;

I want to change my standing rigging of my SM#76.
She about 28 years old and haven’t changed yet - unfortunately.

Do you have any recommendations for me?

Can you please share the parts list?
Prices?
Is it better to prefer original Amel? Or shall I find some aftermarket solutions?

I appreciate for all your valuable responses in advance… Seckin HAYAT SM#76


Onan MDKAL Generator Fuel Solenoid SM2000

Mike Ondra
 

Hello fellow Amelians,

Having an issue with the genset on SM2000.

After no use for 3 months, it would crank but not start. After 8 sec preheat, pressing START, engine cranks fine, but no ignition. Visual check confirms that the fuel shutoff solenoid is not moving to open position when START is engaged. When manually pushing the solenoid to open valve, starts fine. The valve remained open after release and ran fine for several hours. Normal shutdown. Then, to test, did the same procedure. Would not start until manual push on solenoid, but now does not stay in the open position.

This generator has only the cutoff switches for temperature and oil pressure, no gauges.

Perhaps someone has a quick explanation for the above from experience.

 

In the meantime, I am trying to figure out the control diagram to assist in troubleshooting. Here’s my logic so far.

The Start/Stop toggle switch functionally cuts off the fuel when pressed to the STOP position. In the START position it must energize the SOLENOID to open the fuel valve. The toggle then “defaults” to a neutral position in the RUN mode, so the SOLENOID must remain energized, but not through the switch or it would be continually energize even when off.

Furthermore, to protect the running engine, a fault in either oil pressure or engine temperature must de-energize the SOLENOID to cut off fuel. The pressure and temperature “senders” lead to a “2 pole double throw” switch which I presume has the capacity to de-energize the fuel cutoff solenoid when the “sender information” does not meet spec.

What I haven’t been able to ferret out is if there is an interface between the START function and the safety cutoff function.

Pressing the START should power the solenoid. Does the safety part of the system need to be “happy” during the start, or is it completely independent and takes over powering the solenoid only AFTER the engine starts?

Will continue the research, but would appreciate insight from other and  would like to know if my assumptions above may be heading me in the wrong direction.

Thanks

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240 Rock Hall, MD

 

 

 


change standing rigging SM

Seckin Barlas
 

Dear Friends;

I want to change my standing rigging of my SM#76.
She about 28 years old and haven’t changed yet - unfortunately.

Do you have any recommendations for me?

Can you please share the parts list?
Prices?
Is it better to prefer original Amel? Or shall I find some aftermarket solutions?

I appreciate for all your valuable responses in advance…
Seckin
HAYAT SM#76


Re: Bow-thruster repair at anchor

Grant Starling
 

Brilliant Paul really helpful....can you tell me who you ordered the parts though?  I have been thinking of rebuilding my bow thruster for a while, now I know how!  Best Grant


Re: Anchor sizing

James Alton
 

Hello,. I was wondering if anyone could comment on the expected service life of the Cromox chain?  Also, has anyone had any failures or corrosion issues with this grade of chain.  This would certainly be a big expenditure but perhaps worthy of consideration given the mess that traditional steel chains can cause.

James Alton
SV Sueno
Karamu #220

On Sep 14, 2020 3:27 AM, "Bryce Procter via groups.io" <Balibryce@...> wrote:
Hi Tuen,

Price for 100m Cromox Grade 60 10mm short link $8690 AUD ($6332 USD). 
This is from Bridco Qld Australia, I am also checking to see if it is available in Malaysia which is where my boat is currently moored.
I have a container being shipped from here to Malaysia next month so freight from here won't be an issue if I need to buy here.

Cheers

Bryce
SM 2K #467



Re: Anchor sizing

Bryce Procter
 

Hi Tuen,

Price for 100m Cromox Grade 60 10mm short link $8690 AUD ($6332 USD). 
This is from Bridco Qld Australia, I am also checking to see if it is available in Malaysia which is where my boat is currently moored.
I have a container being shipped from here to Malaysia next month so freight from here won't be an issue if I need to buy here.

Cheers

Bryce
SM 2K #467


Re: Anchor sizing

Jose Venegas
 

Rob, I have an Ultra 35 and it bits well the SM2000 and, so far has worked very well in 35+ kn winds for two years.

I bought the Ultra at the Newport, Road Island boat show the week after I had a scary drag incident in Province Town (Cape Cod) using the SQR anchor that came with Ipanema and have worked well for 10 years.
I have sailed overnight from Boston and set the Danford well in at 3 AM before going to bed. Wind was light from the north but I made sure it was well set. However, in the morning the wind shifted to the east with a strong 30 kt breeze and next time I checked, I was rapidly moving towards the beach. I turned the engine on and brought the anchor up noticing that it was fouled with a fishing net. Unfortunately, the prop ended up being fouled by the line attached to the fishing net, but fortunately I had already removed the net from the anchor and I sent it back on time.
Thinking about the incident I realized that, although the anchor had set well the night before, the 90+degrees wind shift had pulled the anchor free allowing it to catch the net before it had a chance to set again.

Back to Newport boat show, Ultra had demonstration sand and gravel pits to show the effectiveness of several models of different types of anchors. As a scientists I used to be, I asked if I could do a test to evaluate what happened with the CQR and the Ultra well set when the wind shifted 90 degrees. The result was clear and reproducible. The Ultra remained set and just rotated digging itself more, while the Danford came out and took a while before it set up again.
As I kept repeating the experiment (Scientist don’t believe a single finding), more and more people joined the spectators to the point that they ended up selling several anchors that afternoon and were willing to give me a discount above that of the boat show when I bought my anchor.

From this experiment it was clear that one of the great advantages of the Ultra anchor is its ability to remain well set when the wind shifts. I believe this is due to the winglets it has which guides the digging. The other reason may be that the tip of the anchor is weighted (filled with lead) which helps it to dig into the bottom. Finally, compared with the Rocna type anchors, the Ultra has much greater area opposing it dragging motion which should give it an advantage on soft mud bottoms.

Jose Venegas
Ipanema SM2K 278
In Curaçao


.


Re: Anchor sizing

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Teun,

Actually the extra weight in the chain locker (if it physically fits) may not be so bad as most 54s are a bit tail-heavy and could do with some leveling.

Arno
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Anchor sizing

Teun BAAS
 

Bryce,

 

What price did you get for the 100m CROMOX and where would it be delivered/purchased?

 

Best Regards Teun

A 54 2009 #128

September 13, 2020 13:08:18

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bryce Procter via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2020 05:29
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Anchor sizing

 

Nice setup there, are you using two 100m lengths of S/S chain there? If so do you find the weight an issue?
Not to mention cost! I just enquired about 100m of Chromox 10mm, makes the anchor look cheap. 

 

Bryce

 

SM 2K # 647


Re: Anchor sizing

Teun BAAS
 

Last paragraph from Arno below is why, after my initial negative reaction, I decided to take the expensive CROMOX option into consideration.

 

Many of my recent (much, much more expensive and not really necessary – as in: new 3rd generation BAMAR furlers while the 2nd generation was working fine; new VOLVO PENTA while existing one could be “fixed”; complete new B&G navigation & radar system while the OEM FURUNO was working fine etc.) changes/”upgrades” were “safety” justified so then why hesitate with a USD7,300 anchor chain????

 

So now I am considering getting the CROMOX for the main anchor and switch the 100 meter galvanized I purchased last year to the secondary anchor; need to research if the additional weight in the bow will be negatively impacting the sailing.

 

Best Regards Teun

 

A54 2009 #128

September 13, 2020 13:02:20

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arno Luijten via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2020 05:50
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Anchor sizing

 

The chain came with the boat. It is Amel supplied and regrettably only 316L (it is WASI-chain I have just learned) so not suitable for long term anchoring. The main anchor is all chain. The secondary has 15 m chain and whole lot of rode (never checked it in detail).
Cromox is really good and really expensive I agree. On the other hand if you practically live behind you anchor there is a strong case for biting the bullet. It will last much longer then galvanized and behave much nicer in the chain locker. 316L is downright dangerous for full time anchoring. By the time we are able to start doing that we may need to some sacrifices and buy Cromox. For now this works excellent for us.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Mark McGovern
 

Joerg,

I think you ask a great question.   The only information that I have been able to find regarding anything remotely close to answering the question of what actually happens if you keep LiFePO4 batteries at a 100% SOC is from Rod Collins at Compass Marine.  He has been researching, using, experimenting on, and installing LiFePO4 batteries on boats since 2008 both on his personal sailboat and professionally as a marine electrician.  He is also part of the committee that is writing the ABYC safety standard for Li-Ion batteries. His extremely long and detailed treatise on LiFEPO4 batteries in marine systems is here: https://marinehowto.com/lifepo4-batteries-on-boats/

Below is the excerpt on the two long-term experiments that he has conducted on what happens if you leave LiFePO4 batteries at a 100% SOC for a long period of time:

STORAGE SOC EXPERIMENT: We recently ended a very expensive experiment regarding storage at 100% SOC. The test duration wound up being 12 1/2 months using four 100Ah CALB SE cells where they were charged to 100% SOC and then left to sit idle with no connections to a BMS or other parasitic loads. The low temp recorded over the 12 1/2 months was 46°F and the high temp was 87°F. This test was meant to be a representation of the real wold.
 
A min/max capture thermometer was used to record the peaks. The cells, prior to letting them sit at 100% SOC for 12 1/2 months, were regularly testing at 101.2 to 101.3 Ah’s of capacity (previous 6 Ah capacity tests) as a 12V nominal bank. After 12 1/2 months the cells were discharged to a cut off voltage of 2.9V for the lowest cell. After 12 1/2 months of doing nothing but sitting there, at 100% SOC, the cells had lost 11.6% of their previous rigorously confirmed Ah capacity. Now imagine if you additionally stressed the cells by continually float charging them. Ouch!!!!
 
“The cells lost 11.6% of their confirmed capacity just sitting at 100% SOC”
 
UPDATE: We have now completed a second round of this type of testing with a brand new prismatic cell. The difference was rather dramatic and I have no explanation as to why? The second test we did went for 13 months, under identical testing criteria, and this cell only lost 3.8% of previously verified Ah capacity. While this is quite a bit less capacity loss it still lost capacity.
 
How can LFP cell manufacturers suggest that the mere act of storage, at 100% SOC, is bad for the cells, which we have physically tested and confirmed is degrading them, and then suggest it is okay to float? How can they say “store at 50-60% SOC” yet then give you a “float” voltage?
 
I can sum up my feelings on the cell manufacturers, and their charge voltage guidance, like this:
 
They figured out a great recipe, they can repeatably make the recipe, but they have no idea why it tastes so good.
Once again, I will ask any and all Li-Ion battery researchers or scientists (I know many of you are reading this because I have your emails) to please send me any credible data to suggest a “need” for such high voltage charging guidance for the proposed use as a marine house bank.

I have not found any other source that has conducted a similar experiment and published the results.  If anyone else has, please post a link as I would love to read it.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Re: Sharki genoa top furling device blocked

Volker
 

On Sun, Sep 13, 2020 at 08:23 AM, Aras wrote:
Dear Aras,

I tried my very best to show you how the swivel parts fit together. The shaft seals need to be replaced when taking the swivel apart with help of a hydraulic press.
The shaft seals do have the seize 62x85x10 mm.
The problem were was the lower white plastic bearing which needed to be grinded from the inside by 1/10 mm.

I have contacted Amel asking or help but they are not able to support. Neither with a spare part nor by any technical information. It seems that they have no files of the old models any more available.
Not a brilliant service☹️

Regards
Volker
Mickmoon, Sharki, hull 176


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Joerg,

Actually these cars do not charge to 100% on daily basis. Other then Tesla you are not allowed the top 5 percent of the charge meaning you can only charge to 95%. Typically Supercharging only goes to 80% to preserve the batteries. Tesla advises to not use the top 10-20% of  the capacity for daily commuting and keep the SOC between 20 and 80%. Off topic : there is some data available that suggests that extensive supercharging affects battery life so that explains the advise of Tesla. Battery warranty is only for 70 or 80% of the capacity so if you loose 19% of the capacity it is on you.

Also cars use a different chemistry (Li-ion instead of LiFePO4)  and are not kept at 100% SOC for extended periods of time. Lithium does not like to be KEPT (as in days or weeks) at 100% but if you start draining shortly after charge the impact is not so great.
The use case for cars is very different from boats. Most people don't stay in their car when not driving, so everything is switched off. No so for a boat. So a car can sit without charging for some time but on your boat (when in use) you are constantly draining the batteries.

Cheers,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121

1941 - 1960 of 56168