1979 Amel Maramu Refit


Chris Kennedy
 
Edited

Hello everyone, 

I am currently looking at a Maramu that the regular upkeep has been neglected for quite some time. I am a complete newbie to sailing and looking at doing a complete refit, sails, standing and running rigging, and possibly electrical. I know, run away right...
My question is about the hull, this boat had a complete bottom job in 2015 to address the osmosis and was sealed/painted at that time but nothing since. Is there any structural issues that can happen when the boat is neglected for that long? Im not asking about if it was ran into anything but if it has sat in the ocean for 8 years without bottom paint, has never been cleaned on deck except with natural rain and just ignored, would the structure of the boat and integrity deteriorate? 
I appreciate all feedback from anyone with experience with older Amels and how they stand up to time.

I appreciate the comments and truly appreciate the one that answered the question I had. I must not of worded the question correctly as I received mostly opinions on whether to undertake such a task, while they may of come from a caring heart. I have a fair amount of experience in motor repair, electrical, cabinetry and refurbishing as well as living off grid for over a decade. I am blessed with time, patience, skill and money so my question was purely about the effects of saltwater on the fiberglass hull when neglected as I do not have much experience in this. I did just start this journey of sailing so i am rookie with that and I should of been more clear. Although I am fairly excited to gain a vast amount of experience and knowledge through not relying on a ship that is in perfect condition. Again, thank you all for your time to comment and the concerns you shared. I look forward to using this group in the future and will try to word my inquiries in a better manner to target the correct audience and results.

Thanks


 

My guess is that if this Maramu can be restored to good condition, you should probably have a bit of luck and 100,000 euro.

I always tell my clients that the cheapest Amel is actually the most expensive Amel.

I hope this helps, and best of luck. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Tue, Apr 5, 2022, 10:35 Chris Kennedy <ckennedy7979@...> wrote:
Hello everyone, 

I am currently looking at a Maramu that the regular upkeep has been neglected for quite some time. I am a complete newbie to sailing and looking at doing a complete refit, sails, standing and running rigging, and possibly electrical. I know, run away right...
My question is about the hull, this boat had a complete bottom job in 2015 to address the osmosis and was sealed/painted at that time but nothing since. Is there any structural issues that can happen when the boat is neglected for that long? Im not asking about if it was ran into anything but if it has sat in the ocean for 8 years without bottom paint, has never been cleaned on deck except with natural rain and just ignored, would the structure of the boat and integrity deteriorate? 
I appreciate all feedback from anyone with experience with older Amels and how they stand up to time.

Thanks


JB Duler
 

Chris,
That Maramu can outlive you.

If you have ZERO experience, don't do it. The Maramu is a big and complex boat, start with a 25' or 30'.
It will cost you 4 x the amount of money you think you could budget.
Without a lot of experience you won't be able to assess the work of boat yards "handymen". They will drill holes in the wrong places and will mess up everything.
If nothing else hire a very good surveyor who has professional liability insurance, that will be a warranty that they stand by their work and their recommendations.

I personally would not worry too much about 8 years without bottom paint. That would be the least of my worries. Look for corrosion around seacocks, measure electrical leaks, check for rot damage, analyze electrical wires, batteries, etc...Run the engine, send samples to a lab (a better get the surveyor to do that).

In the late 70s folks started building ferro cement boats in their backyard. Most never left the ground. Simply because dreamers realized that the cost of a hull is not much compared to the price of EVERYTHING else: mast, sails, plumbing, engine, electrical, electronics, mahogany wood,etc...

Good luck,


--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


amelforme
 

Hello Mr.Kennedy and I hate to be a buzz killer but your first inclination is most likely more correct than you could ever imagine. Run away, quickly.

 

All boats like two things in abundance, exercise and maintenance. Deprive it of one and you have a challenge. Deprive it of both and you have a disaster. Add to that your admitted rookie status and I am all but certain  that this purchase could cure you from further boat ownership in short time.

 

At the very least, engage a surveyor, hopefully one with Amel experience, and have him take a moisture meter to the entire boat. This will be very telling and will indicate if any further funds spent is a reasonable assumption.

 

In 42 years of selling Amel boats all over the world. I have seen this scenario played out more often than I would wish, almost always with less than pleasant results.

 

This is a golden rule; The most expensive Amel you will ever own is the cheapest one you can buy.

 

If you would care to tell me where the boat is, its year of build, hull number and name, I will give you any information I may or may not have in my files. My private email is jfpottercys ‘AT’ att.net

 

Good luck to you however you decide to proceed.

 

All the best,

Joel

 

           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.

                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 5, 2022 10:36 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] 1979 Amel Maramu Refit

 

Hello everyone, 

I am currently looking at a Maramu that the regular upkeep has been neglected for quite some time. I am a complete newbie to sailing and looking at doing a complete refit, sails, standing and running rigging, and possibly electrical. I know, run away right...
My question is about the hull, this boat had a complete bottom job in 2015 to address the osmosis and was sealed/painted at that time but nothing since. Is there any structural issues that can happen when the boat is neglected for that long? Im not asking about if it was ran into anything but if it has sat in the ocean for 8 years without bottom paint, has never been cleaned on deck except with natural rain and just ignored, would the structure of the boat and integrity deteriorate? 
I appreciate all feedback from anyone with experience with older Amels and how they stand up to time.

Thanks


Dave_Benjamin
 

I used to own a 1979 Maramu myself. The previous owner started the refit on the boat. When he sold it to me he lost about $100k USD.
The only way to make a thorough refit pencil out is if you can buy the boat for next to nothing and even then it may cost way more than you think.
We did some further work ourselves and enjoyed the boat for some years. Good luck. 


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Run.find a better Amel. This one will cost a fortune to fix
Danny
SM 299
Ocean  Pearl

On 06/04/2022 02:35 Chris Kennedy <ckennedy7979@...> wrote:


Hello everyone, 

I am currently looking at a Maramu that the regular upkeep has been neglected for quite some time. I am a complete newbie to sailing and looking at doing a complete refit, sails, standing and running rigging, and possibly electrical. I know, run away right...
My question is about the hull, this boat had a complete bottom job in 2015 to address the osmosis and was sealed/painted at that time but nothing since. Is there any structural issues that can happen when the boat is neglected for that long? Im not asking about if it was ran into anything but if it has sat in the ocean for 8 years without bottom paint, has never been cleaned on deck except with natural rain and just ignored, would the structure of the boat and integrity deteriorate? 
I appreciate all feedback from anyone with experience with older Amels and how they stand up to time.

Thanks


Walter van Grieken
 

Welkom
👍

Verstuurd vanaf mijn iPad

Op 6 apr. 2022 om 02:08 heeft Chris Kennedy <ckennedy7979@...> het volgende geschreven:



[Edited Message Follows]

Hello everyone, 

I am currently looking at a Maramu that the regular upkeep has been neglected for quite some time. I am a complete newbie to sailing and looking at doing a complete refit, sails, standing and running rigging, and possibly electrical. I know, run away right...
My question is about the hull, this boat had a complete bottom job in 2015 to address the osmosis and was sealed/painted at that time but nothing since. Is there any structural issues that can happen when the boat is neglected for that long? Im not asking about if it was ran into anything but if it has sat in the ocean for 8 years without bottom paint, has never been cleaned on deck except with natural rain and just ignored, would the structure of the boat and integrity deteriorate? 
I appreciate all feedback from anyone with experience with older Amels and how they stand up to time.

I appreciate the comments and truly appreciate the one that answered the question I had. I must not of worded the question correctly as I received mostly opinions on whether to undertake such a task, while they may of come from a caring heart. I have a fair amount of experience in motor repair, electrical, cabinetry and refurbishing as well as living off grid for over a decade. I am blessed with time, patience, skill and money so my question was purely about the effects of saltwater on the fiberglass hull when neglected as I do not have much experience in this. I did just start this journey of sailing so i am rookie with that and I should of been more clear. Although I am fairly excited to gain a vast amount of experience and knowledge through not relying on a ship that is in perfect condition. Again, thank you all for your time to comment and the concerns you shared. I look forward to using this group in the future and will try to word my inquiries in a better manner to target the correct audience and results.

Thanks


Eric Freedman
 

Hi Chris,

Where are you located?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Chris Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2022 10:36 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] 1979 Amel Maramu Refit

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello everyone, 

I am currently looking at a Maramu that the regular upkeep has been neglected for quite some time. I am a complete newbie to sailing and looking at doing a complete refit, sails, standing and running rigging, and possibly electrical. I know, run away right...
My question is about the hull, this boat had a complete bottom job in 2015 to address the osmosis and was sealed/painted at that time but nothing since. Is there any structural issues that can happen when the boat is neglected for that long? Im not asking about if it was ran into anything but if it has sat in the ocean for 8 years without bottom paint, has never been cleaned on deck except with natural rain and just ignored, would the structure of the boat and integrity deteriorate? 
I appreciate all feedback from anyone with experience with older Amels and how they stand up to time.

I appreciate the comments and truly appreciate the one that answered the question I had. I must not of worded the question correctly as I received mostly opinions on whether to undertake such a task, while they may of come from a caring heart. I have a fair amount of experience in motor repair, electrical, cabinetry and refurbishing as well as living off grid for over a decade. I am blessed with time, patience, skill and money so my question was purely about the effects of saltwater on the fiberglass hull when neglected as I do not have much experience in this. I did just start this journey of sailing so i am rookie with that and I should of been more clear. Although I am fairly excited to gain a vast amount of experience and knowledge through not relying on a ship that is in perfect condition. Again, thank you all for your time to comment and the concerns you shared. I look forward to using this group in the future and will try to word my inquiries in a better manner to target the correct audience and results.

Thanks


Chris Kennedy
 

Thank you


Chris Kennedy
 

Hello Eric,

Im currently in Sicily. Been bouncing around a bit from the US to Panama To Sicily. Enjoying seeing different places and looking at different boats.
Fair winds to you as well


James Alton
 

Chris,

   I have owned Maramu #220 since 2016.  I have been involved in sailing since I was 11 and have been in the boat repair/maitenance business since the early 80's so  I have  worked on quite a few boats.  When I saw my first Maramu I knew right away that this was something new to me.  I have been used to buying a boat with the expectation of having to redesign and rebuild it to make it viable for serious cruising but the Amel Maramu was clearly already well designed and the workmanship was very good.  So were the systems that were installed such as the expensive AMFA FW pump that is now 34 years and works perfectly, as does the original Amel hot water heater, the Eberspacher forced air diesel heater which got us comfortably through an unusally cold Turkish winter in comfort etc.  I have found my Maramu to handle very well, especially at slower speeds and unlike many boats with a skeg hung rudder you can back this one to your hearts content once you understand the dynamics.  So far as buying a fixer upper boat, the one thing that you can never "fix" is a boat of poor design or one that was poorly constructed of poor materials so you are potentially looking a great boat worthy of restoration.   One good thing about the boat being in the water so long is that you will know if you have a blister problem since the boat will have them.   Blisters can be serious in some boats, I have seen people grind right through a hull trying to remove them but in a well made boat they are usually very superficial, either just between the gelcoat and the skin out layer of glass or maybe between the first skin layer of glass and the structural layers.  I would be very surprised if yours are structural but do grind some out to see how deep they go if this boat has them.  A good fiberglass laminate does fine in water and the tests I have seen show that there is very little degradation over time.  The decks and cabin structures are balsa cored and it is critical to keep water from getting into the balsa so this is something you need to check.  Every penetration through the deck or cabin surface is a potential problem but here again with an Amel this is less of a concern because there are not many penetrations as compared to other boats.  The elimination of a hull to deck joint is a HUGE deal to me since traditional screwed, bolted and hucky pucked hull/deck joints almost always leak.  Our boat doesn't leak...  As a newbie my advice if you should decide to buy this boat is to plan to do a restoration on the boat rather than to try to modify and mold into what you think that you want in a boat.  Start with preservation by rebedding every deck/cabin fastener and fix any leaks.  These boats are incredibly well thought out and the odds of a newbie making an improvement in the design is not great!   A restored Maramu will be able to safely take you anywhere you want to go in comfort and will have good value.  Once you have sailed your boat for a number of years, then and only then consider making changes.   Just my two cents. Note that I might be a little biased since I have been having so much fun with my boat but I have owned a lot of boats and for blue water sailing this one is the best (but still affordable)  model that I have come across.  I specifically bought the Maramu that I did because it had not been modified from original.  And don't be afraid of the old systems, some of them are almost bullet proof.

James Alton
SV Sueno
Marmaris,  Turkey


-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Kennedy <ckennedy7979@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Apr 6, 2022 1:22 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] 1979 Amel Maramu Refit

Thank you


Lance Leonard
 

We own Minerva Maramu #135 a 1983 model. We recently had the hull soda blasted barrier coated and the bottom painted. Minerva had been the victim of an atrocious attempt at a barrier coat in the past. Epoxy over anti fouling paint caused poor adhesion allowing water penetration. Even after this the hull was in good shape underneath. If you have the skills, and an inexpensive place to store the boat to do the work, go for it. Amels are special, and we’ll worth the effort to restore. Just don’t expect to get all of your investment back.