[Amel Yacht Owners] Pointing ability of Super Maramu


Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@...>
 

Hello David,

Flat water, 34-36 degrees apparent is achievable with concentration and 40
degrees is easy. 45 degrees can be counted on in all but the worse
wind/wave conditions with an unfurled jib. If your sails are original, I'll
bet they have deteriorated more than you imagine. Weight plays an important
part of the equation as most Amels are too front heavy when loaded for
cruising. Get weight out of the bow. A clean bottom and an undamaged
leading edge to the keel are obvious further considerations.

My new boat with new sails and relatively empty will go to 33 degrees in
flat water and 38 degrees is easy enough for the pilot to manage when
steering to the wind instrument. Watch the weight! It's easy to accumulate
lotsa stuff!

Hope this helps.

Joel F. Potter, Super Maramu Millennium # 400 ( MARY BROWN)


David Crisp
 

Hi Joel,

Thanks for the feedback. I was at the Southampton boatshow
yesterday and the Amel rep talked of 35deg or even less as being
normal with the La Rochelle demo boat he sails. When I apply your
comments to his claim it now makes sense - an empty boat, new
sails. Darn it I had hopes of going to windward better!!

I think 45deg is the reality for most of us in cruising mode.
I don't believe we have a particularly heavily loaded boat (famous
last words with all that storage maybe I deceive myself?!) and I
have always been very careful to keep weight out of the bows - most
lockers empty or light stuff. That said I have maybe sacrificed
that weight consciousness with 100' extra chain.

My genoa is a brand new Doyle 115% which I had made specifically for
the Caribbean trades. From day one we were still stuck in the 43-
45deg range (fully unfurled). Being technically minded what puzzles
me is how weight effects pointing ability. I had always assumed the
problem was fundementally the wide sheeting angle.

As they always say boats are about compromises and the Amel is a
very very good one. That said I'll be sad to sell Gallant when we
return to the UK, but for sailing around Europe in our variable
winds one needs good windward ability.

Again thanks for your usual precise advice. I will take a hard
look at our weight when we get back aboard and definately have a
campaign to shift things aft. Maybe keeping the water tanks half
empty will also help - 500l water is a lot of weight.

Best regards
David

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Joel F. Potter"
<jfpottercys@w...> wrote:
Hello David,

Flat water, 34-36 degrees apparent is achievable with
concentration and 40
degrees is easy. 45 degrees can be counted on in all but the worse
wind/wave conditions with an unfurled jib. If your sails are
original, I'll
bet they have deteriorated more than you imagine. Weight plays an
important
part of the equation as most Amels are too front heavy when loaded
for
cruising. Get weight out of the bow. A clean bottom and an
undamaged
leading edge to the keel are obvious further considerations.

My new boat with new sails and relatively empty will go to 33
degrees in
flat water and 38 degrees is easy enough for the pilot to manage
when
steering to the wind instrument. Watch the weight! It's easy to
accumulate
lotsa stuff!

Hope this helps.

Joel F. Potter, Super Maramu Millennium # 400 ( MARY BROWN)