Topics

Batteries


rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

I have the original Amel supplied sealed batteries. My monitor
will
show 100% after charging but I haven't really paid attention to the
voltage after charging. What should it be when the batteries are
fully charged?

Thanks, Gary Silver SM #335 Liahona
Hi Gary,
I have the older model battery monitor, and % charge is
unreliable. Therefore, I monitor voltage closely. Fully charged
Delphi sealed batteries, with little or no load on them, should read
close to or above 26 volts. This reading should be obtained at least
30 minutes after charging has stopped. Really good batteries will
read as high as 26.3 or 26.4 volts. I recharge when the voltage
drops below 25 volts. I would not recommend letting them go below
24.75 volts (Again, measured with little or no load. A heavy load
will drop the voltage).
If the batteries "top off" too quickly, and also discharge
quickly, it is usually a sign that they are sulfated. I have found
that applying an equalization charge, using my Heart Interface
inverter/charger, of 32 volts for a period of 8 hours, does wonders
for restoring the health of the Delphi batteries. I now apply an
equalization charge every 3 months or so, and the batteries act like
new. How long this will last, I don't know. My first set lasted 5
years, but that was in the Med, with lots of motoring and marinas.
Since then, with 18 months of ocean cruising and few marinas, I have
found that the batteries lose their "vigor" faster.
Hope this helps.

By the way, Mr. Wagner at Dessalator is very helpful. If I
remember correctly, his English is quite good, too.

Regards, Roy


amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Regarding: "in the case of Sealed batteries (like the original Amel
Delphi/Delco batteries), voltage after you finish charging. "

Hi Roy:

I have the original Amel supplied sealed batteries. My monitor will
show 100% after charging but I haven't really paid attention to the
voltage after charging. What should it be when the batteries are
fully charged?

Thanks, Gary Silver SM #335 Liahona


rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

Hello Ian & Judy,
I think I can help you sort out your battery questions, but please
tell me first: what brand and model batteries do you have installed,
and what battery monitor do you have? Also, what brand and size
battery chargers do you have? And, do the battery chargers have an
equalization cycle?
Some battery monitors are programmed to show a % charge number
based on an assumed recharge efficiency. That is, to replace 100 amp-
hrs into batteries, you will need to generate 130 or 140 or 150 amp-
hrs, depending on the program that is in the battery monitor. A more
accurate measure of battery charge is Specific Gravity of the battery
acid, or in the case of Sealed batteries (like the original Amel
Delphi/Delco batteries), voltage after you finish charging.
Let me know what you have, and I will let you know what I think
based on 21 years experience with Amel batteries!!
Best regards, and Feliz Navidad,
Roy Benveniste
SM Excalibur #195


jjwiggin02 <no_reply@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian & Judy Jenkins"
<ianjudyjenkins@h...> wrote:
On our SM, 302, June 2000 launch, now lived aboard for 18 months,we
find
that at sea we run the genset about every six hours for an hour to
an hour
and a half on each occasion. Less when at anchor without autohelm,
nav
lights radar etc.Our first batteries ( we have 420 amps) lasted two
years,
since when I tend to recharge when we are down to 90% ( We found
that the
fridge cut out somewhere below 87% notwithstanding the fact that we
still
had 24v).
I find that the recharge quickly up to 99% but that those last few
amps,say the last 7, take for ever.
Does anyone know how important it is to always recharge to 100%?
The one thing I would suggest when running the genset is to check
that the
220v fan is working ( put your hand over the outlet in the cockpit
coaming.
) Ours failed in the Caribean and the extra heat in the engine room
was
appparently the reason why our 50 amp charger failed after 3 years,
to be
followed by the 30 amp one ten weeks later.This, despite the fact
that both
chargers have heat cut outs.The first failed in Guadeloupe and was
beyond
the knowledge of Pochon for a speedy repair.but both were repaired
by Manuel
in Ecuador ( thank God for the third world--they still know how to
fix
things there).He said he had never seen anything so hi tech and
powerful in
such a small box--the last time he saw such a powerful gadget it was
the
size and weight of his mother in law!
The cost of a new 220v fan ,one new 50 amp and two repairs was
unwelcome,
and I don`t understand the need for the 220v fan. The two 24v fans
are much
more powerful,give you an element of redundancy, much cheaper and
can be
sourced anywhere.Is there a good reason why they could not be wired
up to
come on with the genset just as they come on with the Volvo/Yanmar?
Ian. Pen
Azen
Azen,

If you are trying to charge to 100% you will be running your genset
far more than necessary. Conventional wisdom is that it is bad for
the batteries to go below 50% and that above 80% further recharging
becomes increasingly less cost-effective. Therefor an optimal program
would be to dischage to 50% and re charge to only 80%. Crossing the
Atlantic 19 days with 6 people, radar on most of the time,
transmitting daily on SSB, two refrigerators and a freezer, we ran it
for 1 to 1 1/2 hours twice a day.

Hope this helps,

Jim Wiggin, ANTARES, Amel SM
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ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

On our SM, 302, June 2000 launch, now lived aboard for 18 months,we find that at sea we run the genset about every six hours for an hour to an hour and a half on each occasion. Less when at anchor without autohelm, nav lights radar etc.Our first batteries ( we have 420 amps) lasted two years, since when I tend to recharge when we are down to 90% ( We found that the fridge cut out somewhere below 87% notwithstanding the fact that we still had 24v).
I find that the recharge quickly up to 99% but that those last few amps,say the last 7, take for ever.
Does anyone know how important it is to always recharge to 100%?
The one thing I would suggest when running the genset is to check that the 220v fan is working ( put your hand over the outlet in the cockpit coaming. ) Ours failed in the Caribean and the extra heat in the engine room was appparently the reason why our 50 amp charger failed after 3 years, to be followed by the 30 amp one ten weeks later.This, despite the fact that both chargers have heat cut outs.The first failed in Guadeloupe and was beyond the knowledge of Pochon for a speedy repair.but both were repaired by Manuel in Ecuador ( thank God for the third world--they still know how to fix things there).He said he had never seen anything so hi tech and powerful in such a small box--the last time he saw such a powerful gadget it was the size and weight of his mother in law!
The cost of a new 220v fan ,one new 50 amp and two repairs was unwelcome, and I don`t understand the need for the 220v fan. The two 24v fans are much more powerful,give you an element of redundancy, much cheaper and can be sourced anywhere.Is there a good reason why they could not be wired up to come on with the genset just as they come on with the Volvo/Yanmar? Ian. Pen Azen

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