Topics

some questions


Mark Pitt
 

In preparing my ASM for a multi-year voyage next year, I am hoping
that other owners can offer me advice on a number of issues:

1. My wife an I will need to look out for coral heads when entering
South Pacific islands. What is the best way to get a few feet above
the deck in order to have better visibility? Are mast steps up 10
feet or so a good way to get the needed visibility? Do foldable mast
steps pose any structural or safety issue with the Amel main mast?
Are rat lines a good option?

2. Another way to spot coral heads is to install sonar. The
transducers seem very large for most forward looking sonars such as
EchoPilot and Interphase? What do these transducer do to sailing
performance on the Amel Super Maramu? Are the sonars practically
useful for finding one's way in coral fringed islands?

3. I would like to add some fuel capacity for ocean crossing. I am
thinking about strapping a 100 gallon bladder tank to the roof aft of
the mizzen. Once across the ocean, I would roll the tank up and store
it in a locker. Has anyone had any experience with bladder tanks
(such as those made by ATL or Nauta)? Is there some reason that this
would be a bad idea? Would there ne a lot of fuel sloshing noise?

4. Has anyone used AGM batteries in an ASM? Is there any issue with
charge regulation with AGMs in a newer (2003) ASM?

Mark
"Sabbatical III" ASM #419


edmund_steele
 

Mark,
My wife and I used an improvised rope ladder attached to the
starboard shrouds, to enable the reef watcher to stand on the
reinforcing bar for the bracket that holds the ballooner poles. This
worked reasonably well and gets the watcher 8 feet or so above the
deck.

I was concerned about reports that it might be necessary to motor
from Panama to Galapagos and decided to carry an extra 100 gallons of
diesel in 20 of 5 gallon "Jerry" jugs. They were cheap to buy from
West Marine. We initially stowed 8 jugs in the stern locker with 12
lashed on deck – 6 on each side at the stern. We never did need all
of this fuel and gave away 8 of the jugs in the Marquise Islands. We
now typically stow 10 jugs in the stern locker with two on deck and
we throw these two into the stern locker as soon as they are emptied.
Most refueling in the South Pacific was by dinghy and Jerry Jug -
making bladder use problematic. We found that 5 gallon Jugs are
reasonably easy to handle in and out of a dinghy by one person. Two
additional advantages are 1) you can see what quantity of fuel you
are receiving (the Jugs are marked in both gallons and liters)
instead of trusting the supplier and 2) You can filter every drop of
fuel going into the main tank. If you purchase the large size Baja
filter from West Marine, it fits exactly into the fuel filler on the
SM and rests stably on the mizzen deck. We found it very simple to
refuel at sea by sitting on the starboard cockpit bench and pouring
the fuel directly into the Baja filter with the Jerry jug held in the
lap. No siphons etc. No spilled fuel. Refuel in a seaway.
Ed Steele
S/V DoodleBug SM#331

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "markmpitt" <mark_pitt@b...>
wrote:

In preparing my ASM for a multi-year voyage next year, I am hoping
that other owners can offer me advice on a number of issues:

1. My wife an I will need to look out for coral heads when entering
South Pacific islands. What is the best way to get a few feet above
the deck in order to have better visibility? Are mast steps up 10
feet or so a good way to get the needed visibility? Do foldable
mast
steps pose any structural or safety issue with the Amel main mast?
Are rat lines a good option?

2. Another way to spot coral heads is to install sonar. The
transducers seem very large for most forward looking sonars such as
EchoPilot and Interphase? What do these transducer do to sailing
performance on the Amel Super Maramu? Are the sonars practically
useful for finding one's way in coral fringed islands?

3. I would like to add some fuel capacity for ocean crossing. I am
thinking about strapping a 100 gallon bladder tank to the roof aft
of
the mizzen. Once across the ocean, I would roll the tank up and
store
it in a locker. Has anyone had any experience with bladder tanks
(such as those made by ATL or Nauta)? Is there some reason that
this
would be a bad idea? Would there ne a lot of fuel sloshing noise?

4. Has anyone used AGM batteries in an ASM? Is there any issue
with
charge regulation with AGMs in a newer (2003) ASM?

Mark
"Sabbatical III" ASM #419


amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "edmund_steele" <edmundsteele@...> wrote:

Mark wrote, " 2. Another way to spot coral heads is to install sonar. The transducers
seem very large for most forward looking sonars such as EchoPilot and Interphase? What
do these transducer do to sailing performance on the Amel Super Maramu? Are the sonars
practically useful for finding one's way in coral fringed islands?"

15 Feb 2006

Mark: I had Amel install an Interphase Twin Scope on my SM 2000 Hull # 335 at the time
of purchase (July 2001). Amel would only install the display and a single transducer.
They refused to install both transducers. As they explained to me, their experience was
limited to the single transducer (vertical scanning) and felt that two transducers or the
dual combined transducer, which is physically larger, would create turbulance and
interefere with the B & G sonic speed system. At my first haul out I installed the second
transducer (horizontal scanning) for the TwinScope about 18 inches in front of the Amel
installed transducer. This places it slightly higher than the vertical scanning transducer
and therefore does not shadow the signal from it. The system works well at speeds under
3 to 4 knots, even better at 1-2 knots, does not interefere with the sonic speed in any way
that I can determine and has saved out bacon several times so far. It is NOT the
ultimate answer to avoiding coral heads etc as it can be fooled by thermoclines etc., yet I
have found it a useful tool when combined with a careful watch, good lighting, and careful
navigation. I can't detect any discernable decrement in sailing performance but it only
makes sense that it increases drag and disrupts laminar water flow. I do find the
horizontal scanning mode more difficult to interpret but as with any graphical tool,
practice makes perfect. Display readability in bright sunlight is its main weak feature.
Would I do it again? Yes!

Regards, Gary S. Silver Amel SM 2000 Hull # 335