[Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out


john martin <symoondog@...>
 

I agree. Why do you need a battery charger if you aren't using any power? If I leave my boat for 6 months with all power cut off including the 2 main switches,and come back to find dead batteries, I'm going to get rid of those turkeys. Serge on Mango 51 was right. If you need parts for your Perkins, call Trans Atlantic diesel in the U.S. 804-6429296
John ' Moondog" SM 248




To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.comFrom: no_reply@yahoogroups.comDate: Sat, 8 Dec 2007 23:22:54 +0000
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out




I have had a Super Maramu (#195) for 10 years, currently hauled out in Deltaville, VA. Before that, a Maramu for 13 years. I have stored these boats hauled out in the US and Europe many of the winters. I NEVER left a boat plugged in for the winter. The batteries always did fine. (I turn off ALL power-drawing items) My batteries have lasted 5 - 8 years. I have always used the Delco sealed batteries (original Amel equipment), but other batteries should also do fine over the winter.If a battery charger trips a circuit breaker, the problem is a short somewhere in the system, or a faulty charger. Boat yard electrical systems are notoriously poor. Unless you are living aboard, don't leave your boat plugged in. It's not a good idea.Roy, Excalibur (SM #195)






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Patrick McAneny
 

I wrote the original question concerning battery charging on the hard. There
has been several responses,and more than one, that questioned why I felt it
necessary to charge my batteries and that it was a mistake for me to leave my
boat plugged in to shore power. So, I thought I'd respond.When I hauled my
boat my batteries didn't have a full charge. I know its not good for batteries
to be stored for the winter with less than a full charge, so that's why I
felt it necessary to charge them. As far as leaving my boat plugged in, I never
said nor would I ever leave my boat plugged in. I wrote only to determine if
anyone else ever had the main 220v breaker trip while plugged into 110v 60
hertz. I'm pretty sure my system has no short as someone suggested. Could it
be a voltage drop or could it be the 60 hertz? Anyway, thanks for all the
input, I'm sure I'll sort it out.

Pat SM 123



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rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Pat,

I think I have the same electrical configuration as you: a step-
up transformer that takes the 110V 60 Hz shore power, and steps it up
to 220/230V 60 Hz. From there it goes to the battery charger, the
water heater, A/C units, and other 220V appliances. There is a
circuit breaker just above the transformer, near the battery
charger. I have had this trip several times when plugged in to shore
power in the US. Invariably, the problem was bad shore power,
usually a small amount of voltage on the ground lead, which leads to
the breaker tripping. As I said before, marina and boatyard
electrical systems are notoriously prone to faults.
But it could also be caused by too high a voltage on the 110V
input, resulting in more than 230V out of the transformer. You can
check for both of these easily with a voltmeter. As far as I know,
and in my experience, low voltage will not trip the breaker, and 60Hz
(vs 50Hz)definitely will not. I have had low voltage (around 180V
out of the transformer)for over a week at a marina, and no problems
with either the battery charger or the circuit breaker.
Finally, if the fault is not in the input line, you need to check
the current draw of your battery charger. A circuit breaker will
trip under three possible conditions: too high current, too high
voltage (both of which will overheat the breaker and trip it), or a
short (including a ground fault). If your breaker trips after an
hour of operation, it may be that your battery charger is drawing too
much current, causing the breaker to trip from overheating. To check
for this, you need a system ammeter, or another way to measure
current draw. (Look up amelliahona's posts on how to measure
electricity draw).
Hope all this helps. Please ask more questions as you work on the
problem. That's what this site is all about.

Roy, Excalibur, SM #195


Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Hi, we had the same kind of issues and removed the
AMEL supplied charger and transformer. One is tha the
transformer is alway hot given it is a coil designe to
store power. So you always have hgh voltage present.
BE VERY VERY CAREFUL IF YOU HAVE TO WORK ON IT...

We replaced the charger with a 90-260 volt 50/60 cycle
Dolphine (the US name for a Rya charger that Amel
used). We also installed an inverter wired to the 24
volt bank to run our 110 volt cycle stuff. This work
quite well with no "dock" voltage issues. We also ran
all of 110 volt plug off the inverter. That did not
take much to wire as we simply picked up the 110 line
in the engine room from the inverter. Not a big deal
and used the 110 breaker for safety...
good luck and good charging..
Richard on SM 209 in Port Annapolis
--- rbenven44 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi Pat,

I think I have the same electrical configuration
as you: a step-
up transformer that takes the 110V 60 Hz shore
power, and steps it up
to 220/230V 60 Hz. From there it goes to the
battery charger, the
water heater, A/C units, and other 220V appliances.
There is a
circuit breaker just above the transformer, near the
battery
charger. I have had this trip several times when
plugged in to shore
power in the US. Invariably, the problem was bad
shore power,
usually a small amount of voltage on the ground
lead, which leads to
the breaker tripping. As I said before, marina and
boatyard
electrical systems are notoriously prone to faults.
But it could also be caused by too high a voltage
on the 110V
input, resulting in more than 230V out of the
transformer. You can
check for both of these easily with a voltmeter. As
far as I know,
and in my experience, low voltage will not trip the
breaker, and 60Hz
(vs 50Hz)definitely will not. I have had low
voltage (around 180V
out of the transformer)for over a week at a marina,
and no problems
with either the battery charger or the circuit
breaker.
Finally, if the fault is not in the input line,
you need to check
the current draw of your battery charger. A circuit
breaker will
trip under three possible conditions: too high
current, too high
voltage (both of which will overheat the breaker and
trip it), or a
short (including a ground fault). If your breaker
trips after an
hour of operation, it may be that your battery
charger is drawing too
much current, causing the breaker to trip from
overheating. To check
for this, you need a system ammeter, or another way
to measure
current draw. (Look up amelliahona's posts on how to
measure
electricity draw).
Hope all this helps. Please ask more questions
as you work on the
problem. That's what this site is all about.

Roy, Excalibur, SM #195



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