Shore power supplies - 220v and 110v


Jose Venegas <jgvenegas@...>
 

I have not tested it but I have been told that the Microwave, the Dish
Washer or the cloth washing drier SHOULD NOT be connected to shore power at
60 Hz even if it is 220V. The pervious owner told me his Microwave was
fried when a guest started it when connected to shore power!

All the rest, water heater, AC, and battery chargers work fine at 60 Hz.

Now, I am still puzzled about one detail that someone in this forum may have
an answer.
The european 240V and the power produced by the generator on board have 3
cables: one live, one neutral and one ground. When you measure the voltages
between them you have Live-neutral and Life to ground =240V, and
neutral-ground =0 volts.
In contrast, when connected to 220V us shore power, the readings from the
same terminals are: Live-neutral:220V, Life to ground 110V and neutral to
ground= 110V. This is because in the US we take the 220V shore power from a
3-phase AC supply where both Live and neutral have voltage relative to
ground.
My question is: does this difference and the fact that one does not have a
true neutral affect stray currents and electrolysis on the boat.

Jose

Ipanema SM2K 278
Hybernating at Constitution Marina
Charles Town, Massachusetts


svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

All,

Shortly after buying BeBe, we fried our original microwave by using 220 volt 60htz.

The following is our guide to EU/US shore power. It is based on what we have done and experienced. It may not be the correct answer, but thus far has worked for us. I placed a photo in the photo section of this website at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/1949812811/pic/989268970/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

Comments or thoughts? I would be most interested in any reply.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2, #387

Wiring colors and schemes:
EUROPEAN & most of the world except USA 230-250 Volt AC has 3 wires with color codes as follows:
1. Brown = European Hot or Live
2. Blue = European Return
3. Green/Yellow Stripe = Earth or Safety Ground

USA 220 Volt AC typically has 4 wires with color codes as follows:
1. Red = USA Hot
2. Black = USA Hot
3. White = USA Neutral
4. Green = Earth or Safety Ground

Voltage measurements:
EUROPEAN & most of the world except USA:
Between the Brown and Blue Reads 230-250 Volts AC
Between the Blue and the Green with Yellow Stripe Reads Zero Volts AC
Between the Brown and the Green/Yellow Stripe Reads 230-250 Volts AC
USA:
Between the Red and Black Reads 220 Volts AC
Between the Red and White Reads 110 Volts AC
Between the Black and White Reads 110 Volts AC
Between the White and Green Reads Zero Volts AC

When wiring the Amel cable from the boat to USA power, we do the following:
1. The Brown Wire (Hot) should go to either the USA Red or Black Hot wire
2. The Blue Wire (Return) should go to the USA Red or Black Hot wire (whichever the Brown wire isn't connected to. My understanding, and please correct me if I am wrong, is that the polarity of these two connections (red and/or black to blue and/or brown makes no difference).
3. The Green with Yellow Stripe wire should go to the USA Green wire.
4. The USA white wire has nothing connected to it from the European cable.

Special Note: When connected to US power, we do not run the washer, dishwasher, watermaker, or microwave…

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Jose Venegas <jgvenegas@...> wrote:

I have not tested it but I have been told that the Microwave, the Dish
Washer or the cloth washing drier SHOULD NOT be connected to shore power at
60 Hz even if it is 220V. The pervious owner told me his Microwave was
fried when a guest started it when connected to shore power!

All the rest, water heater, AC, and battery chargers work fine at 60 Hz.

Now, I am still puzzled about one detail that someone in this forum may have
an answer.
The european 240V and the power produced by the generator on board have 3
cables: one live, one neutral and one ground. When you measure the voltages
between them you have Live-neutral and Life to ground =240V, and
neutral-ground =0 volts.
In contrast, when connected to 220V us shore power, the readings from the
same terminals are: Live-neutral:220V, Life to ground 110V and neutral to
ground= 110V. This is because in the US we take the 220V shore power from a
3-phase AC supply where both Live and neutral have voltage relative to
ground.
My question is: does this difference and the fact that one does not have a
true neutral affect stray currents and electrolysis on the boat.

Jose

Ipanema SM2K 278
Hybernating at Constitution Marina
Charles Town, Massachusetts