Going to Weather


sbmesasailor
 

This discussion has been fascinating and I thought I'd add my "solution" though it may be heresy to Joel and silly to the professional sailmakers out there.
 
I converted Libertad (Maramu #121) into a cutter-rigged ketch with a removable main staysail stay attached to a plate through-bolted to the anchor locker bulkhead (added running backstays as well).  On this stay, I hankon a low cut jib (staysail) that sheets inside the shrouds and yes, I did mount track and cars -no leaks yet.  On long passages (it would clearly be a pain to have to furl the genoa for every tack) on any point between 50 degrees and a beam reach, this sail adds another 1/2 knot of boat speed in wind 15 knots or less (obviously don't need it in wind over that).  I don't do long passages above 50 degrees -I am a gentleman afterall; besides my wife wouldn't stand for it.  I used it frequently in my recent pacific puddle crossing and I suspect I'll be using it for the leg to the Tuamotus which appears to be close to a beam reach.  I also had a stormsail made to hankon as I understand moving this type of sail closer to the center of
the boat is the best position. 
 
The result is I can definitely point higher without stalling but I don't go very fast and I drop the mizzen due to bad air off the main.  However, next time I go to weather I will spend more time trimming  both for the optimal leach shape as Danny has described.
 
Dennis Johns
s/v Libertad
Taiohae, Nuku Hiva
Marquesas, French Polynesia


Dave_Benjamin
 

Dennis,

Your solution is fine and has some advantages in that you retain the big genoa for when it makes sense to use. Did you use wire or spectra for the stay? One of the things I'll often tell our customers is that different configurations aren't necessarily right or wrong, but simply a different approach. There's some drawbacks to your arrangement but advantages as well. It obviously works. You've had a good passage to the South Pacific and that's what matters.

My goal has been to use the twins without involving the headsail. My approach requires investment in Facnor hardware, a code zero, modifying the ballooners to have a common luff or building new ones, and construction of a specialized headsail. It's not for the faint of heart. I think it's a great sailplan but not for everyone.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Johns <sbmesasailor@...> wrote:

This discussion has been fascinating and I thought I'd add my "solution" though it may be heresy to Joel and silly to the professional sailmakers out there.
 
I converted Libertad (Maramu #121) into a cutter-rigged ketch with a removable main staysail stay attached to a plate through-bolted to the anchor locker bulkhead (added running backstays as well).  On this stay, I hankon a low cut jib (staysail) that sheets inside the shrouds and yes, I did mount track and cars -no leaks yet.  On long passages (it would clearly be a pain to have to furl the genoa for every tack) on any point between 50 degrees and a beam reach, this sail adds another 1/2 knot of boat speed in wind 15 knots or less (obviously don't need it in wind over that).  I don't do long passages above 50 degrees -I am a gentleman afterall; besides my wife wouldn't stand for it.  I used it frequently in my recent pacific puddle crossing and I suspect I'll be using it for the leg to the Tuamotus which appears to be close to a beam reach.  I also had a stormsail made to hankon as I understand moving this type of sail closer to the center of
the boat is the best position. 
 
The result is I can definitely point higher without stalling but I don't go very fast and I drop the mizzen due to bad air off the main.  However, next time I go to weather I will spend more time trimming  both for the optimal leach shape as Danny has described.
 
Dennis Johns
s/v Libertad
Taiohae, Nuku Hiva
Marquesas, French Polynesia

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