[Amel Yacht Owners] Pole takedown


Peter Killen
 

I have always swung both poles out whether or not I use the two, since I seem to remember, during training, that Olivier had stated that too much pressure on one side of the mast was a bad idea.  Am I wrong in this?

Peter
Pure Magic 433

On 3 Nov 2015, at 03:38, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

All good techniques. The key is that someone needs to be prepared to "catch" the pole when the blue line is eased. I like to lower the pole about 1-2 feet before easing the blue line, so that when the pole comes toward the boat it is about 6" to 1' above the rail, then we lower it and hook it to the rail on the inside of the rail. I usually ease the blue line, while Judy pulls on the sheet and red line and is prepared to catch. I also help with the catching with one hand. I have done this alone...you should practice this while at anchor with crew members.

Getting the long pole to swing out while someone is pulling on the blue line takes practice. If there is some roll to the boat, use the roll to your advantage...and always make sure that the swivel block on the bitter end of the long pole is horizontal...if not, you will have a difficult time getting it to swing out.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 5:11 PM, Bob Fritz U sailboatdelivery@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

This is my procedure for setting and retrieving the long pole on the SM.
1. Set the short pole on the mast and attach the long pole and hook it on the rail.
2. Attach the fore guy, (blue line), the after guy, (red line), the down haul, (yellow line), and the pole lift. If from the factory, the lines are marked at the cleat point. I hope I have the colors correct.
3. Run the genoa sheet through the sheave on the end of the pole.
4. Deploy the pole by hauling rapidly on the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, use gravity to help by hauling when the boat rolls to the same side as the pole.
5. Unfurl the jib and sheet home.
6. Reverse the procedure for removing the pole. Furl the jib first and proceed from there.
7. Lower the pole to the level of the stanchion.
8. Maintain control of the pole by having a crew take up on the after guy as you ease the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, bring in the pole when the boat rolls to the pole side. Be sure the assisting crew is far enough aft that they will not be hit by the pole if control is lost. A bumper or cushion on the stanchion or rail will prevent damage should things go bad. I have never yet had a problem with the pole hitting the water although it could happen if the pole is lowered too much.





Alan Leslie
 

I wouldn't have thought there would be much pressure on the mast from the pole unless you were flying a sail from it and you didn't have a sail on the other side pole to balance it - just the bare pole wouldn't do it.
We sail with the poles and guys attached ready to go and frequently pole out the genoa only - poling out the jib / genoa is common practice on most yachts.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Ian Shepherd
 

No Peter you are not wrong. The inwards pressure on the pole can be considerable and the focal point of this pressure is six feet above the step. When the weld on my same side lower spreader failed whilst using only the port side pole, the mast crumpled around the pole attachment point.

Significantly when I accepted the boat back from Amel after repairs, the Amel representative sailing with me said that in strong winds it would be a good idea to rig poles on both sides to lessen the side thrust on the mast.

I remember someone pointing out to me before I owned an Amel that the pole design was not a good idea due to the loads being so high up the mast. I believe that Amel learnt from my mishap and did away with the concept on the 54 by attaching the poles at the foot of the mast.
Ian Shepherd SM2K Crusader (2003) Larnaca Cyprus


On 03/11/2015 17:32, peter killen peterkillen@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

I have always swung both poles out whether or not I use the two, since I seem to remember, during training, that Olivier had stated that too much pressure on one side of the mast was a bad idea. Am I wrong in this?


Peter
Pure Magic 433
On 3 Nov 2015, at 03:38, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


All good techniques. The key is that someone needs to be prepared to "catch" the pole when the blue line is eased. I like to lower the pole about 1-2 feet before easing the blue line, so that when the pole comes toward the boat it is about 6" to 1' above the rail, then we lower it and hook it to the rail on the inside of the rail. I usually ease the blue line, while Judy pulls on the sheet and red line and is prepared to catch. I also help with the catching with one hand. I have done this alone...you should practice this while at anchor with crew members.

Getting the long pole to swing out while someone is pulling on the blue line takes practice. If there is some roll to the boat, use the roll to your advantage...and always make sure that the swivel block on the bitter end of the long pole is horizontal...if not, you will have a difficult time getting it to swing out.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 5:11 PM, Bob Fritz U sailboatdelivery@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

This is my procedure for setting and retrieving the long pole on the SM.
1. Set the short pole on the mast and attach the long pole and hook it on the rail.
2. Attach the fore guy, (blue line), the after guy, (red line), the down haul, (yellow line), and the pole lift. If from the factory, the lines are marked at the cleat point. I hope I have the colors correct.
3. Run the genoa sheet through the sheave on the end of the pole.
4. Deploy the pole by hauling rapidly on the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, use gravity to help by hauling when the boat rolls to the same side as the pole.
5. Unfurl the jib and sheet home.
6. Reverse the procedure for removing the pole. Furl the jib first and proceed from there.
7. Lower the pole to the level of the stanchion.
8. Maintain control of the pole by having a crew take up on the after guy as you ease the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, bring in the pole when the boat rolls to the pole side. Be sure the assisting crew is far enough aft that they will not be hit by the pole if control is lost. A bumper or cushion on the stanchion or rail will prevent damage should things go bad. I have never yet had a problem with the pole hitting the water although it could happen if the pole is lowered too much.






Peter Killen
 

Ian,

Many thanks for your response.

Regards,

Peter

SM2K 433 Pure Magic

On 19 Nov 2015, at 12:41, Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

No Peter you are not wrong. The inwards pressure on the pole can be considerable and the focal point of this pressure is six feet above the step. When the weld on my same side lower spreader failed whilst using only the port side pole, the mast crumpled around the pole attachment point.

Significantly when I accepted the boat back from Amel after repairs, the Amel representative sailing with me said that in strong winds it would be a good idea to rig poles on both sides to lessen the side thrust on the mast.

I remember someone pointing out to me before I owned an Amel that the pole design was not a good idea due to the loads being so high up the mast. I believe that Amel learnt from my mishap and did away with the concept on the 54 by attaching the poles at the foot of the mast.

Ian Shepherd SM2K Crusader (2003) Larnaca Cyprus


On 03/11/2015 17:32, peter killen peterkillen@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 

I have always swung both poles out whether or not I use the two, since I seem to remember, during training, that Olivier had stated that too much pressure on one side of the mast was a bad idea.  Am I wrong in this?


Peter
Pure Magic 433
On 3 Nov 2015, at 03:38, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

All good techniques. The key is that someone needs to be prepared to "catch" the pole when the blue line is eased. I like to lower the pole about 1-2 feet before easing the blue line, so that when the pole comes toward the boat it is about 6" to 1' above the rail, then we lower it and hook it to the rail on the inside of the rail. I usually ease the blue line, while Judy pulls on the sheet and red line and is prepared to catch. I also help with the catching with one hand. I have done this alone...you should practice this while at anchor with crew members.

Getting the long pole to swing out while someone is pulling on the blue line takes practice. If there is some roll to the boat, use the roll to your advantage...and always make sure that the swivel block on the bitter end of the long pole is horizontal...if not, you will have a difficult time getting it to swing out.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 5:11 PM, Bob Fritz U sailboatdelivery@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

This is my procedure for setting and retrieving the long pole on the SM.
1. Set the short pole on the mast and attach the long pole and hook it on the rail.
2. Attach the fore guy, (blue line), the after guy, (red line), the down haul, (yellow line), and the pole lift. If from the factory, the lines are marked at the cleat point. I hope I have the colors correct.
3. Run the genoa sheet through the sheave on the end of the pole.
4. Deploy the pole by hauling rapidly on the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, use gravity to help by hauling when the boat rolls to the same side as the pole.
5. Unfurl the jib and sheet home.
6. Reverse the procedure for removing the pole. Furl the jib first and proceed from there.
7. Lower the pole to the level of the stanchion.
8. Maintain control of the pole by having a crew take up on the after guy as you ease the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, bring in the pole when the boat rolls to the pole side. Be sure the assisting crew is far enough aft that they will not be hit by the pole if control is lost. A bumper or cushion on the stanchion or rail will prevent damage should things go bad. I have never yet had a problem with the pole hitting the water although it could happen if the pole is lowered too much.