[Amel Yacht Owners] fresh water hose join to pipe


James Alton
 

Bill,
   
  Thanks for your input on the butyl tape.  I always wondered if it were safe to use on/under plexiglass so good to know.    Can you clean up the dirt that attaches with a solvent?  I am going to start using the butyl tape as a bedding material and see how I like it.  

  I thought that I would mention a caulking that has worked well for me in bedding large plexiglass windows with a lot of movement.  It is the Dow Corning 3145, which is a non corrosive (actually primarily used for electrical work), very elastic and strong  silicone caulking.  If you sand the edge of the plexiglass and apply the plastic primer recommended by Dow(I can get the part # on the primer if anyone needs it) to the bonding surfaces, the adhesion is amazing.  I used this initially on a customers boat that had a lot of flex in the cabin trunk and huge windows that tore the regular marine silicone caulkings apart in 2-3 years with regularity.  The  3145  generally lasted 7-8 years which saved a lot of labour.   It only comes in clear and gray unfortunately and the gray is what you want for long UV exposure.  One downside is that the stuff can take a lot of heat so using a heat gun to warm a fitting for removal is not very effective.  A sharpened putty knife seems to be the best way to go.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy

  

On Mar 6, 2017, at 1:41 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Where would I not use butyl tape...  that's a good question...


Not for anything permanently under water. Thru-hull fittings and such should have an adhesive sealant. 
Not for sealing things that are routinely exposed to solvents, including diesel and gasoline.

Otherwise, I think pretty much anything goes.  It is compatible with plastics, so it's good for bedding windows and hatches.  When you use it to bed down a plexiglass window if you use enough, and squeeze it out, it is easy to get an attractive seam.

One downside is that since it is non-curing it stays sticky.  That's good on the inside of the joint, but if it is exposed in a wide seam it will attract dirt.

Bill Kinney
SM#160 Harmonie
La Parguera, Puerto Rico

---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Bill,

   I have heard good things about the butyl caulking tape.   I have removed quite a bit of hardware that was bedded with it over the years and don’t recall see many problems but I have not used it much myself to date.  Are there any limitations in where you would use this material?  I hadn’t thought about the shelf life aspect, that alone is a good reason to carry at least some aboard.  I have some of the tape  and will put some in the box of parts I am taking to the boat on the next trip over.

   Yes, I can imagine that trying to migrate a solvent into caulking to soften it would be a slow process.  If the fitting is metal that you want to remove, try heating it up to about 200F.  I find that I can usually  remove the fitting using very little stress so no damage the gelcoat/fiberglass.  It is of course preferable to only heat the metal part,  not the gelcoat/fiberglass since heat will soften that as well.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy




greatketch@...
 

James,

With butyl you can clean the edges... but it is still sticky (and will always be) and debris just sticks again.  So for a place with a thick, exposed seam, it might not be best choice.  

There are some little tips and tricks that aren't really unique to bedding butyl, but seem to help.  Where bolts go through a deck, put a little countersink around the bolt hole to give the butyl someplace to flow into and seal more of the bolt's length.  When tightening bolts, try as much as possible to turn the nut, NOT the bolt, to keep from spinning the butyl around. If two parts have a really tight fit, I have put washers between them as spacers to make sure that I don't squeeze out too much of the butyl.

I replaced a large plexiglass window in an old S2 sailboat that was installed with 3145 that didn't leak but was crazed to opaque.  The manufacturer's recommended method for removal of the old window:  Sledgehammer. It worked :)

Bill Kinney
SM#160 Harmonie
La Parguera, Puerto Rico.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Bill,
   
  Thanks for your input on the butyl tape.  I always wondered if it were safe to use on/under plexiglass so good to know.    Can you clean up the dirt that attaches with a solvent?  I am going to start using the butyl tape as a bedding material and see how I like it.  

  I thought that I would mention a caulking that has worked well for me in bedding large plexiglass windows with a lot of movement.  It is the Dow Corning 3145, which is a non corrosive (actually primarily used for electrical work), very elastic and strong  silicone caulking.  If you sand the edge of the plexiglass and apply the plastic primer recommended by Dow(I can get the part # on the primer if anyone needs it) to the bonding surfaces, the adhesion is amazing.  I used this initially on a customers boat that had a lot of flex in the cabin trunk and huge windows that tore the regular marine silicone caulkings apart in 2-3 years with regularity.  The  3145  generally lasted 7-8 years which saved a lot of labour.   It only comes in clear and gray unfortunately and the gray is what you want for long UV exposure.  One downside is that the stuff can take a lot of heat so using a heat gun to warm a fitting for removal is not very effective.  A sharpened putty knife seems to be the best way to go.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy



James Alton
 

Bill,

   I had a good laugh a couple times today thinking of your sledgehammer and plexiglass window removal!  You ask an interesting question about whether it makes sense to use caulking that can end up lasting longer than the plexiglass.   With some sharp reefing tools and sharped putty knives it is possible to cut through the 3145 but it is not much fun.  

  I use the C-sink method with caulk as well and agree that is a good idea.  I hadn’t thought about the not turning the bolt when using butyl and will keep that in mind.  Thanks for all of the butyl tips,  I will start using some and see how it goes.

James Alton
SV  Sueno,  Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy

On Mar 7, 2017, at 12:54 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

James,


With butyl you can clean the edges... but it is still sticky (and will always be) and debris just sticks again.  So for a place with a thick, exposed seam, it might not be best choice.  

There are some little tips and tricks that aren't really unique to bedding butyl, but seem to help.  Where bolts go through a deck, put a little countersink around the bolt hole to give the butyl someplace to flow into and seal more of the bolt's length.  When tightening bolts, try as much as possible to turn the nut, NOT the bolt, to keep from spinning the butyl around. If two parts have a really tight fit, I have put washers between them as spacers to make sure that I don't squeeze out too much of the butyl.

I replaced a large plexiglass window in an old S2 sailboat that was installed with 3145 that didn't leak but was crazed to opaque.  The manufacturer's recommended method for removal of the old window:  Sledgehammer. It worked :)

Bill Kinney
SM#160 Harmonie
La Parguera, Puerto Rico.


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Bill,
   
  Thanks for your input on the butyl tape.  I always wondered if it were safe to use on/under plexiglass so good to know.    Can you clean up the dirt that attaches with a solvent?  I am going to start using the butyl tape as a bedding material and see how I like it.  

  I thought that I would mention a caulki ng that has worked well for me in bedding large plexiglass windows with a lot of movement.  It is the Dow Corning 3145, which is a non corrosive (actually primarily used for electrical work), very elastic and strong  silicone caulking.  If you sand the edge of the plexiglass and apply the plastic primer recommended by Dow(I can get the part # on the primer if anyone needs it) to the bonding surfaces, the adhesion is amazing.  I used this initially on a customers boat that had a lot of flex in the cabin trunk and huge windows that tore the regular marine silicone caulkings apart in 2-3 years with regularity.  The  3145  generally lasted 7-8 years which saved a lot of labour.   It only comes in clear and gray unfortunately and the gray is what you want for long UV exposure.  One downside is that the stuff can take a lot of heat so using a heat gun to warm a fitting for removal is not very effective.  A sharpened putty knife see ms to be the best way to go.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy