[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Photos of complete fuel pre filter and also auxillary 75 gallon fuel tank.


sailormon <kimberlite@...>
 

I sometimes carry 120 gallons of diesel on the port side with little heel to port.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 18, 2017 4:43 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Photos of complete fuel pre filter and also auxillary 75 gallon fuel tank.

 

 

How did you balance the weight of 75 gallons (over 500 pounds) of diesel that far outboard on the port side?

I ask because I am in a constant battle to keep Harmonie from heeling to port, and I have nowhere near that much weight to port!

Bill Kinney
SM#160 Harmonie
Ponce, Puerto Rico


greatketch@...
 

Eric,

I suspect we have different denunciations of what constitutes a "little" heel! Any deviation from even trim I consider unacceptable for sailing performance, especially in light air. Of course if you feel you need 120 gallons of extra fuel you might not be doing much light sir sailing!

If you boat does not heel to port when you put over 600 pounds on the port side she must heel to starboard when that fuel isn't there. Just rules of physics!

Bill Kinney
SM160 Harmonie


James Alton
 

Bill,

   I am fine with heel when the boat is sailing, but I find a static heel at anchor or dockside to be quite annoying personally so I tend to do a lot of moving things around when needed to level the boat.  Heeling to windward in light air on the stb. tack really feels really strange to me.  (grin) It is so great that Amel put the water on centreline so that as it is consumed or filled, there are no heel changes.  A symmetric solution for fuel so that consumption or refilling would not change the heel of the boat would be nice to have I think.  I am considering an auxiliary tank to Port to partially accomplish this and extend the range a bit.  

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220

On Mar 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Eric, 

I suspect we have different denunciations of what constitutes a "little" heel! Any deviation from even trim I consider unacceptable for sailing performance, especially in light air. Of course if you feel you need 120 gallons of extra fuel you might not be doing much light sir sailing!

If you boat does not heel to port when you put over 600 pounds on the port side she must heel to starboard when that fuel isn't there. Just rules of physics!

Bill Kinney
SM160 Harmonie



greatketch@...
 

James,

Heeling to windward in light air doesn't just feel strange, it really cuts down on performance. A classic trick for sailing small boats in light air is to move crew weight to the leeward rail to force a "proper" heel. Gravity then helps pull the sails into a good airfoil shape even when the wind is too light to lift the sails on its own. Heeling to windward will make the sails collapse at higher wind speeds than they will on a flat boat.

But we all have our own ways of sailing. For anybody who feels that the range from the stock diesel tank is insufficient I am guessing that sailing performance in less that 5 knots of wind is not a big concern.


James Alton
 

Eric,

   Having sailed a lot of dinghies in light to no wind conditions, I totally agree with what you are saying about a windward heel in light air hurting performance.  Besides helping the sails stay filled, a bit of heel to leeward generates some weather helm which effectively puts some beneficial camber in the keel/rudder coupling.  A windward heel will cause the coupling to generate additional lift to leeward which isn’t too productive unless you like going sideways. (grin)  I guess if the heel isn’t much and it’s a cruising boat the difference probably is not all that meaningful so for me it is mostly just that I prefer my boat to be level when not in motion.  

   Actually I love to sail in light airs and carry a good inventory of light sails.  The mizzen staysail is one of my favourite sails on the Maramu.  I like the idea of not carrying all of my fuel in one tank just in case..  True, you can carry your spare fuel in jugs that are needed to ferry fuel in certain places but the fuel seems to find a way to get out far too often for me to feel comfortable carrying much in that manner.  I feel that having more capacity can be a good thing since when you find a source of clean/inexpensive fuel you can capitalize on that and not have to go dockside as often.  And you never know when a situation might arise where you are required to motor a lot more than expected.  I don’t see any downside to having more options.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220

On Mar 20, 2017, at 10:01 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

James,

Heeling to windward in light air doesn't just feel strange, it really cuts down on performance. A classic trick for sailing small boats in light air is to move crew weight to the leeward rail to force a "proper" heel. Gravity then helps pull the sails into a good airfoil shape even when the wind is too light to lift the sails on its own. Heeling to windward will make the sails collapse at higher wind speeds than they will on a flat boat. 

But we all have our own ways of sailing. For anybody who feels that the range from the stock diesel tank is insufficient I am guessing that sailing performance in less that 5 knots of wind is not a big concern.