[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.


Eric Freedman
 


Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Wow Eric, that is a lot of fuel! We have the 600L in the main tank and 9 x 23L jerry cans (200L) which fit snugly in the liferaft locker. Those also get emptied first as our main tank uses fuel. We don't fill those unless we are headed on long ocean passages.

We finally completed installing the fuel polishing unit yesterday and also installed a T junction with 2.5m hose to suck fuel out of jerry cans along side. Just used it tonight to fill 500L of fuel from jerry cans.... what a pleasure!. So fast, quiet and not a drop spilt anywhere!

Next week we start heading up the east Australian coast towards Indonesia where we will be for four months. There are so many sorry stories of poor quality fuel there that we will put all fuel through the fuel polishing unit before it goes into our tank.

Colin & Lauren Streeter
Island Pearl II, Amel53 #332
Brisbane


On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 1:38 PM, kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I have used Nauta bladders on a number of my boats. I feel the one to get is the more expensive one with built in straps and plumbing hardware already attached.
We use only one hose to fill and remove fuel from the tanks,
We pump fuel into a 5 gallon bucket and remove it using a Jabsco vane puppy pump
Fueling is a breeze and transferring fuel is equally easy.
 
Between the tank and the pump I have mounted a locking ball valve with a hose barb attached.
Then just attach the hose barb to the vane puppy and another hose to go from the pump to the main fuel tank..
 we stop pumping a number of times and reverse the pump , we call it burping the tank.
if you step on the tank vigorously a lot of air will come out into your 5 gallon bucket. we continue the process till we have 55 gallons in the tank. To remove fuel just reverse the process. when the tank is almost empty we hold it up in the air and get the last drops of fuel out of the tank.
when filling the tanks I also add some fuel preservative to the bucket to prevent any growth when the tank is empty.
 
 
The tank that is strapped to the cabin top rail is filled the same except gravity empties it.
 
we also use the vane pump to pump out auxiliary tanks in the life raft locker.
 
All of this fuel is pumped through the large Racor filter that I mentioned in another post that filters the fuel before it gets into the tank. (Thanks Ian and Judy)
Fair winds
Eris
sm 376 Kimberlite
Eris
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: "dennis@... [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:58 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com

> Thanks for reminding me about flexible tanks Eric. I put two 50
> gal bladders in the stern of a Jeanneau DS43 I used to own. Only
> ever half filled them due to my concern that surging in a rough
> seaway would cause the fittings to fail.




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


greatketch@...
 

A question for those people who carry large amounts of fuel above and beyond the standard tank on the Super Maramu:  Why do you do so?  Do you actually find you use that much, or is it just a comfort level to have a lot of excess?

How much fuel do you actually use on passage?  
How much at anchor? 
What rational do you apply for how much fuel to carry?  

Bill Kinney
SM#160, Harmonie
Charlotte Amalie, StT, USVI


---In amelyachtowners@..., <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote :

Wow Eric, that is a lot of fuel! We have the 600L in the main tank and 9 x 23L jerry cans (200L) which fit snugly in the liferaft locker. Those also get emptied first as our main tank uses fuel. We don't fill those unless we are headed on long ocean passages.

We finally completed installing the fuel polishing unit yesterday and also installed a T junction with 2.5m hose to suck fuel out of jerry cans along side. Just used it tonight to fill 500L of fuel from jerry cans.... what a pleasure!. So fast, quiet and not a drop spilt anywhere!

Next week we start heading up the east Australian coast towards Indonesia where we will be for four months. There are so many sorry stories of poor quality fuel there that we will put all fuel through the fuel polishing unit before it goes into our tank.

Colin & Lauren Streeter
Island Pearl II, Amel53 #332
Brisbane


On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 1:38 PM, kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I have used Nauta bladders on a number of my boats. I feel the one to get is the more expensive one with built in straps and plumbing hardware already attached.
We use only one hose to fill and remove fuel from the tanks,
We pump fuel into a 5 gallon bucket and remove it using a Jabsco vane puppy pump
Fueling is a breeze and transferring fuel is equally easy.
 
Between the tank and the pump I have mounted a locking ball valve with a hose barb attached.
Then just attach the hose barb to the vane puppy and another hose to go from the pump to the main fuel tank..
 we stop pumping a number of times and reverse the pump , we call it burping the tank.
if you step on the tank vigorously a lot of air will come out into your 5 gallon bucket. we continue the process till we have 55 gallons in the tank. To remove fuel just reverse the process. when the tank is almost empty we hold it up in the air and get the last drops of fuel out of the tank.
when filling the tanks I also add some fuel preservative to the bucket to prevent any growth when the tank is empty.
 
 
The tank that is strapped to the cabin top rail is filled the same except gravity empties it.
 
we also use the vane pump to pump out auxiliary tanks in the life raft locker.
 
All of this fuel is pumped through the large Racor filter that I mentioned in another post that filters the fuel before it gets into the tank. (Thanks Ian and Judy)
Fair winds
Eris
sm 376 Kimberlite
Eris
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: "dennis@...  [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:58 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups. com

> Thanks for reminding me about flexible tanks Eric. I put two 50
> gal bladders in the stern of a Jeanneau DS43 I used to own. Only
> ever half filled them due to my concern that surging in a rough
> seaway would cause the fittings to fail.




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Alex,

When we circumnavigated in BeBe (SM #387), we carried 10 of the 18.9 liter containers (Jerry Jugs) in the port side watertight compartment that Amel made for the life raft.

We never needed any of that extra fuel. The most fuel we ever burned on a passage was from the Caribbean side of the Panama Canal to the Galapagos Islands. That was 405 liters and it was because of motoring through the canal and mostly because of lack of wind on the equator. We filled up in the Galapagos and burned a total of 235 liters on the 3,000 passage to French Polynesia.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School 
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970







On Thu, Apr 27, 2017 at 12:06 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

A question for those people who carry large amounts of fuel above and beyond the standard tank on the Super Maramu:  Why do you do so?  Do you actually find you use that much, or is it just a comfort level to have a lot of excess?


How much fuel do you actually use on passage?  
How much at anchor? 
What rational do you apply for how much fuel to carry?  

Bill Kinney
SM#160, Harmonie
Charlotte Amalie, StT, USVI


---In amelyachtowners@...m, wrote :

Wow Eric, that is a lot of fuel! We have the 600L in the main tank and 9 x 23L jerry cans (200L) which fit snugly in the liferaft locker. Those also get emptied first as our main tank uses fuel. We don't fill those unless we are headed on long ocean passages.

We fina lly completed installing the fuel polishing unit yesterday and also installed a T junction with 2.5m hose to suck fuel out of jerry cans along side. Just used it tonight to fill 500L of fuel from jerry cans.... what a pleasure!. So fast, quiet and not a drop spilt anywhere!

Next week we start heading up the east Australian coast towards Indonesia where we will be for four months. There are so many sorry stories of poor quality fuel there that we will put all fuel through the fuel polishing unit before it goes into our tank.

Colin & Lauren Streeter
Island Pearl II, Amel53 #332
Brisbane


On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 1:38 PM, kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

I have used Nauta bladders on a number of my boats. I feel the one to get is the more expensive one with built in straps and plumbing hardware already attached.
We use only one hose to fill and remove fuel from the tanks,
We pump fuel into a 5 gallon bucket and remove it using a Jabsco vane puppy pump
Fueling is a breeze and transferring fuel is equally easy.
 
Between the tank and the pump I have mounted a locking ball valve with a hose barb attached.
Then just attach the hose barb to the vane puppy and another hose to go from the pump to the main fuel tank..
 we stop pumping a number of times and reverse the pump , we call it burping the tank.
if you step on the tank vigorously a lot of ai r will come out into your 5 gallon bucket. we continue the process till we have 55 gallons in the tank. To remove fuel just reverse the process. when the tank is almost empty we hold it up in the air and get the last drops of fuel out of the tank.
when filling the tanks I also add some fuel preservative to the bucket to prevent any growth when the tank is empty.
 
 
The tank that is strapped to the cabin top rail is filled the same except gravity empties it.
 
we also use the vane pump to pump out auxiliary tanks in the life raft locker.
 
All of this fuel is pumped through the large Racor filter that I mentioned in another post that filters the fuel before it gets into the tank. (Thanks Ian and Judy)
Fair winds
Eris
sm 376 Kimberlite
Eris
 
 
----- Original Mess age -----
From: "dennis@...  [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:58 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups. com

> Thanks for reminding me about flexible tanks Eric. I put two 50
> gal bladders in the stern of a Jeanneau DS43 I used to own. Only
> ever half filled them due to my concern that surging in a rough
> seaway would cause the fittings to fail.




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Alex?

No, no, the question was from Bill KinneySM#160 on Harmonie



--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 4/27/17, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@svbebe.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, April 27, 2017, 4:01 PM


 









Alex,
When we circumnavigated in BeBe (SM
#387), we carried 10 of the 18.9 liter containers (Jerry
Jugs) in the port side watertight compartment that Amel made
for the life raft.
We
never needed any of that extra fuel. The most fuel we ever
burned on a passage was from the Caribbean side of the
Panama Canal to the Galapagos Islands. That was 405 liters
and it was because of motoring through the canal and mostly
because of lack of wind on the equator. We filled up in the
Galapagos and burned a total of 235 liters on the 3,000
passage to French Polynesia.
Best,
CW
Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander
Emeritus
Amel School 
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX
77550
+1(832) 380-4970






On Thu, Apr 27, 2017 at
12:06 PM, greatketch@yahoo.com
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.
com> wrote:















 









A question for those people who carry large amounts
of fuel above and beyond the standard tank on the Super
Maramu:  Why do you do so?  Do you actually find you use
that much, or is it just a comfort level to have a lot of
excess?
How much fuel do
you actually use on passage?  How much at
anchor? What rational do you apply for how much
fuel to carry?  
Bill
KinneySM#160, HarmonieCharlotte
Amalie, StT, USVI

---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.co
m, <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote :

Wow Eric, that is a lot of fuel! We have the
600L in the main tank and 9 x 23L jerry cans (200L) which
fit snugly in the liferaft locker. Those also get emptied
first as our main tank uses fuel. We don't fill those
unless we are headed on long ocean passages.
We fina
lly completed installing the fuel polishing unit yesterday
and also installed a T junction with 2.5m hose to suck fuel
out of jerry cans along side. Just used it tonight to fill
500L of fuel from jerry cans.... what a pleasure!. So fast,
quiet and not a drop spilt
anywhere!
Next week we start heading up the
east Australian coast towards Indonesia where we will be for
four months. There are so many sorry stories of poor quality
fuel there that we will put all fuel through the fuel
polishing unit before it goes into our tank.
Colin & Lauren
StreeterIsland Pearl II, Amel53
#332Brisbane

On
Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 1:38 PM, kimberlite@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.c om>
wrote:

 I
have used Nauta bladders on a number of my boats. I feel
the one to get is the more expensive one with built in
straps and plumbing hardware already attached.We
use only one hose to fill and remove fuel from the tanks,

We pump fuel into a 5 gallon bucket and
remove it using a Jabsco vane puppy pump
Fueling is a breeze and transferring fuel is
equally easy. Between the tank and
the pump I have mounted a locking ball valve with a hose
barb attached.Then just attach the hose barb to
the vane puppy and another hose to go from the pump to the
main fuel tank.. we stop pumping a number of
times and reverse the pump , we call it burping the
tank.if you step on the tank vigorously a lot of
ai
r will come out into your 5 gallon bucket. we continue the
process till we have 55 gallons in the tank. To remove fuel
just reverse the process. when the tank is almost empty we
hold it up in the air and get the last drops of fuel out of
the tank.when filling the tanks I
also add some fuel preservative to the bucket to prevent any
growth when the tank is
empty.  The tank that is
strapped to the cabin top rail is filled the same except
gravity empties it. we also use the
vane pump to pump out auxiliary tanks in the life raft
locker. All of this fuel is pumped
through the large Racor filter that I mentioned in another
post that filters the fuel before it gets into the tank.
(Thanks Ian and Judy)Fair
windsErissm 376
KimberliteEris  -----
Original Mess
age -----
From: "dennis@... 
[amelyachtowners]"
Date:
Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:58 am
Subject:
[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons
of diesel.
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.
com

> Thanks for
reminding me about flexible tanks Eric. I put two 50
> gal bladders in the stern of a
Jeanneau DS43 I used to own. Only
>
ever half filled them due to my concern that surging in a
rough
> seaway would cause the fittings
to fail.



--
Colin
Streeter0411 016
445


Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

When prepairing for a passage of 3000 nautical miles, where you can be stuck with no wind, you fill up with as much diesel you can. It is not fun to be in the middle of nowhere with no possibilty to run neither of your motors. Even if we have both solar panels and wind gen we have to run the dieselgen on passages since we run more systems when on the move than on anchor.
If we just move around in areas where it is easy to fill up, we never have more than the 600 liters in the main tank.

/Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232
Portimao, Portugal.

Skickat från min iPad

27 apr. 2017 kl. 18:06 skrev greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

A question for those people who carry large amounts of fuel above and beyond the standard tank on the Super Maramu:  Why do you do so?  Do you actually find you use that much, or is it just a comfort level to have a lot of excess?


How much fuel do you actually use on passage?  
How much at anchor? 
What rational do you apply for how much fuel to carry?  

Bill Kinney
SM#160, Harmonie
Charlotte Amalie, StT, USVI


---In amelyachtowners@..., <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote :

Wow Eric, that is a lot of fuel! We have the 600L in the main tank and 9 x 23L jerry cans (200L) which fit snugly in the liferaft locker. Those also get emptied first as our main tank uses fuel. We don't fill those unless we are headed on long ocean passages.

We finally completed installing the fuel polishing unit yesterday and also installed a T junction with 2.5m hose to suck fuel out of jerry cans along side. Just used it tonight to fill 500L of fuel from jerry cans.... what a pleasure!. So fast, quiet and not a drop spilt anywhere!

Next week we start heading up the east Australian coast towards Indonesia where we will be for four months. There are so many sorry stories of poor quality fuel there that we will put all fuel through the fuel polishing unit before it goes into our tank.

Colin & Lauren Streeter
Island Pearl II, Amel53 #332
Brisbane


On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 1:38 PM, kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I have used Nauta bladders on a number of my boats. I feel the one to get is the more expensive one with built in straps and plumbing hardware already attached.
We use only one hose to fill and remove fuel from the tanks,
We pump fuel into a 5 gallon bucket and remove it using a Jabsco vane puppy pump
Fueling is a breeze and transferring fuel is equally easy.
 
Between the tank and the pump I have mounted a locking ball valve with a hose barb attached.
Then just attach the hose barb to the vane puppy and another hose to go from the pump to the main fuel tank..
 we stop pumping a number of times and reverse the pump , we call it burping the tank.
if you step on the tank vigorously a lot of air will come out into your 5 gallon bucket. we continue the process till we have 55 gallons in the tank. To remove fuel just reverse the process. when the tank is almost empty we hold it up in the air and get the last drops of fuel out of the tank.
when filling the tanks I also add some fuel preservative to the bucket to prevent any growth when the tank is empty.
 
 
The tank that is strapped to the cabin top rail is filled the same except gravity empties it.
 
we also use the vane pump to pump out auxiliary tanks in the life raft locker.
 
All of this fuel is pumped through the large Racor filter that I mentioned in another post that filters the fuel before it gets into the tank. (Thanks Ian and Judy)
Fair winds
Eris
sm 376 Kimberlite
Eris
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: "dennis@...  [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:58 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups. com

> Thanks for reminding me about flexible tanks Eric. I put two 50
> gal bladders in the stern of a Jeanneau DS43 I used to own. Only
> ever half filled them due to my concern that surging in a rough
> seaway would cause the fittings to fail.




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Eric Freedman
 

WE carry a lot of fuel on kimberlite as some of my crew have work schedules and it is necessary to make an airport on time.

We crossed the Atlantic on just the main tank.

Other times we have had to motor extensively around the Bermuda high.

Heading from Colombia last year to Guadeloupe we used a lot of fuel.

 

In my last boat there was no wind for 6 days and I motored from Bermuda to New York.

 

I have always come in with around 600 liters of fuel. But better than 0 liters.

I have only filled the tank on the aft cabin top 2 times in 15 years. And did not need it.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 27, 2017 1:06 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.

 

 

A question for those people who carry large amounts of fuel above and beyond the standard tank on the Super Maramu:  Why do you do so?  Do you actually find you use that much, or is it just a comfort level to have a lot of excess?

 

How much fuel do you actually use on passage?  

How much at anchor? 

What rational do you apply for how much fuel to carry?  

 

Bill Kinney

SM#160, Harmonie

Charlotte Amalie, StT, USVI



---In amelyachtowners@..., <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote :

Wow Eric, that is a lot of fuel! We have the 600L in the main tank and 9 x 23L jerry cans (200L) which fit snugly in the liferaft locker. Those also get emptied first as our main tank uses fuel. We don't fill those unless we are headed on long ocean passages.

 

We finally completed installing the fuel polishing unit yesterday and also installed a T junction with 2.5m hose to suck fuel out of jerry cans along side. Just used it tonight to fill 500L of fuel from jerry cans.... what a pleasure!. So fast, quiet and not a drop spilt anywhere!

 

Next week we start heading up the east Australian coast towards Indonesia where we will be for four months. There are so many sorry stories of poor quality fuel there that we will put all fuel through the fuel polishing unit before it goes into our tank.

 

Colin & Lauren Streeter

Island Pearl II, Amel53 #332

Brisbane

 

 

On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 1:38 PM, kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I have used Nauta bladders on a number of my boats. I feel the one to get is the more expensive one with built in straps and plumbing hardware already attached.

We use only one hose to fill and remove fuel from the tanks,
We pump fuel into a 5 gallon bucket and remove it using a Jabsco vane puppy pump
Fueling is a breeze and transferring fuel is equally easy.

 

Between the tank and the pump I have mounted a locking ball valve with a hose barb attached.

Then just attach the hose barb to the vane puppy and another hose to go from the pump to the main fuel tank..

 we stop pumping a number of times and reverse the pump , we call it burping the tank.

if you step on the tank vigorously a lot of air will come out into your 5 gallon bucket. we continue the process till we have 55 gallons in the tank. To remove fuel just reverse the process. when the tank is almost empty we hold it up in the air and get the last drops of fuel out of the tank.

when filling the tanks I also add some fuel preservative to the bucket to prevent any growth when the tank is empty.

 

 

The tank that is strapped to the cabin top rail is filled the same except gravity empties it.

 

we also use the vane pump to pump out auxiliary tanks in the life raft locker.

 

All of this fuel is pumped through the large Racor filter that I mentioned in another post that filters the fuel before it gets into the tank. (Thanks Ian and Judy)

Fair winds

Eris

sm 376 Kimberlite

Eris

 

 

----- Original Message -----
From: "dennis@...  [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:58 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups. com

> Thanks for reminding me about flexible tanks Eric. I put two 50
> gal bladders in the stern of a Jeanneau DS43 I used to own. Only
> ever half filled them due to my concern that surging in a rough
> seaway would cause the fittings to fail.



 

--

Colin Streeter

0411 016 445


greatketch@...
 

Thanks Eric,

Also thanks to Ann-Sofie and Bill R. for their insights on fuel usage.  It was all useful and has an important place in my knowledge base.

In Eric's comments I see the magic word: "schedule."  If you have a "must do" schedule, then fuel is a required ingredient. You say you always "come in with 600 liters of fuel".  Do remember, that's almost over half a tonne of weight.  I know people who sail larger boats tend to not think about weight very much, but that is adding 3% to the sailing weight of the boat and that DOES have a real impact on light air performance, especially if it puts the boat off her lines.

We avoid schedules like the plague.  We tell people who are sailing with us  that we can tell you WHERE we will meet you, or WHEN we will meet you, but not BOTH.

It's not good or bad, everybody travels in their own style. but here are two examples of why I feel the built in tankage is more than adequate for MY needs.  Your mileage WILL vary!

When I was sailing from Hawaii to San Francisco I COULD have loaded up with fuel and motored on a rumb line though the middle of the East Pacific High.  I know several people who have done it that way. Instead I sailed close-hauled north, then reached east, then ran south to stay in the wind, and out of the high pressure system. Hundreds of miles out of the way, and an extra 5 days or so at sea, but there wasn't a schedule to meet.  All that AND we waited a week for the weather in Honolulu, so I guess you could argue that we were two weeks late because we were light on fuel, but we didn't think of it in those terms. 

As an aside, after a wild and windy passage, we did need to start the engine for the last 10 miles, because we ran out of wind coming in the Golden Gate--how strange that one of the most reliably windy places around failed us!

If we were in Bermuda and had a week of calms forecast, we would just stay put until the weather allowed a comfortable passage. We have waited 2 weeks for a good weather window to go 200 miles--because we can. Kind of an old fashioned approach, but we do have the luxury of not having a schedule imposed on us from the outside world, and we work very hard not to set one for ourselves.  The very idea of listening to the engine run for days at a time makes my head hurt!

Again, thanks to all for their input!

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charlotte Amelie, StT, USVI


---In amelyachtowners@..., <kimberlite@...> wrote :

WE carry a lot of fuel on kimberlite as some of my crew have work schedules and it is necessary to make an airport on time.

We crossed the Atlantic on just the main tank.

Other times we have had to motor extensively around the Bermuda high.

Heading from Colombia last year to Guadeloupe we used a lot of fuel.

 

In my last boat there was no wind for 6 days and I motored from Bermuda to New York.

 

I have always come in with around 600 liters of fuel. But better than 0 liters.

I have only filled the tank on the aft cabin top 2 times in 15 years. And did not need it.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

  


Eric Freedman
 

Bill,

My friend Eric Forsythe has circumnavigated twice –(both ways) circumnavigated the Antarctic.

Twice and numerous passages totaling over 325,000 miles and is going out again in July at age 85 on his home made yacht Fiona. (CCA Blue water Recipient). I don’t believe he ever had more than 120 gallons on board.

 

I also recall him sailing 20 miles a day for many days on the equator a few years ago.

 

Me personally I will turn on the motor.

 

When I referred to Bermuda, I was speaking about the Bermuda high that usually is good for 3-5 days of no wind.

Of course if I were in Bermuda I would stay and wait for wind.

We usually pass Bermuda 175-200 miles east or west of Bermuda. Have sailed by that island I think 32 times.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, April 28, 2017 10:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: kimberlite can carry 345 Gallons of diesel.

 

 

Thanks Eric,

 

Also thanks to Ann-Sofie and Bill R. for their insights on fuel usage.  It was all useful and has an important place in my knowledge base.

 

In Eric's comments I see the magic word: "schedule."  If you have a "must do" schedule, then fuel is a required ingredient. You say you always "come in with 600 liters of fuel".  Do remember, that's almost over half a tonne of weight.  I know people who sail larger boats tend to not think about weight very much, but that is adding 3% to the sailing weight of the boat and that DOES have a real impact on light air performance, especially if it puts the boat off her lines.

 

We avoid schedules like the plague.  We tell people who are sailing with us  that we can tell you WHERE we will meet you, or WHEN we will meet you, but not BOTH.

 

It's not good or bad, everybody travels in their own style. but here are two examples of why I feel the built in tankage is more than adequate for MY needs.  Your mileage WILL vary!

 

When I was sailing from Hawaii to San Francisco I COULD have loaded up with fuel and motored on a rumb line though the middle of the East Pacific High.  I know several people who have done it that way. Instead I sailed close-hauled north, then reached east, then ran south to stay in the wind, and out of the high pressure system. Hundreds of miles out of the way, and an extra 5 days or so at sea, but there wasn't a schedule to meet.  All that AND we waited a week for the weather in Honolulu, so I guess you could argue that we were two weeks late because we were light on fuel, but we didn't think of it in those terms. 

 

As an aside, after a wild and windy passage, we did need to start the engine for the last 10 miles, because we ran out of wind coming in the Golden Gate--how strange that one of the most reliably windy places around failed us!

 

If we were in Bermuda and had a week of calms forecast, we would just stay put until the weather allowed a comfortable passage. We have waited 2 weeks for a good weather window to go 200 miles--because we can. Kind of an old fashioned approach, but we do have the luxury of not having a schedule imposed on us from the outside world, and we work very hard not to set one for ourselves.  The very idea of listening to the engine run for days at a time makes my head hurt!

 

Again, thanks to all for their input!

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Charlotte Amelie, StT, USVI



---In amelyachtowners@..., <kimberlite@...> wrote :

WE carry a lot of fuel on kimberlite as some of my crew have work schedules and it is necessary to make an airport on time.

We crossed the Atlantic on just the main tank.

Other times we have had to motor extensively around the Bermuda high.

Heading from Colombia last year to Guadeloupe we used a lot of fuel.

 

In my last boat there was no wind for 6 days and I motored from Bermuda to New York.

 

I have always come in with around 600 liters of fuel. But better than 0 liters.

I have only filled the tank on the aft cabin top 2 times in 15 years. And did not need it.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376