[Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Options in Santorin


David Wallace
 

Eric,

At one time I had four Trojan H16s in our boat (same size and weight I think as the US Battery ones). They sit fairly close to centerline and there was no issue regarding weight balance, which as you know is really most affected by the amount of diesel in the tank!

Dave Wallace
sv Air ops
Maramu #104
Puerto Escondido, Sea of Cortez, Mx

On Jun 13, 2017, at 12:45 PM, ericmeury@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


So the first set of batteries that I replaced shortly after i bought to boat at pretty much done.


I have been thinking of going with Trojan's T105 but these came up


they are much taller at 16 inches tall and 4 of them would fit in the engine room.  I currently have 5 12 volt batteries for a total of 500 amp hours.    4 of these would give me a huge battery bank.  Do you think it too much weight on one side of the boat.


http://usbattery.com/products/6-volt-batteries/us-l16hc-xc2/





Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Eric,

I looked at your idea a little differently than you did.
4 each of the GP903 6VDC 360 amp/hr @ 6VDC batteries would give you 720 amp/hours at 12VDC at 416 pounds 337 sq"
6 each of the GP31 115 amp/hour batteries would give you 690 amp/hours at 400 pounds 526 sq"
6 each of the Trojan T-105 225 amp/hr @ 6VDC batteries would give you 675 amp/hours at 12VDC at 372 pounds 439 sq"

So, the short answer, I believe is that no matter what type of voltage or amp/hour flooded battery you buy, the amp/hours will be about 1.75 pounds per amp. and the footprint in terms of sq inches varies. If footprint is important, and I think it is, you will get more amps/sq" with the GP903 battery.

Another consideration is that you might want to stick with what is common rather than searching for an uncommon solution that may not be appreciated by the Santorin's next owner. And, make your decision based on how much weight you feel is appropriate for your amp reward. My guess is that you are not racing your Santorin.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970




Ian Park
 

David,
I had one battery out of four house batteries die just before leaving Cape Verde for Barbados. I removed it. The other 3 x 110 ah batteries were fine. I replaced all the house batteries when we eventually reached Martinique. What I learnt was that I had to ensure more frequently that the batteries were charged up when they got below 80%, but the bank of 3 didn't take as long to fully charge.
You didn't mention whether you still have the original Santorin charging regime or if you have added solar, wind or gen set. Also will you operate mainly from a marina with shore power or self sufficient anchorages.
A bigger bank may last longer, but takes longer to charge to 100% - important if you want maximum life from the bank.
Just another dimension to add to the decision making.
All the best.

Ian 'Ocean Hobo' SN96


Ian Park
 

David,
Sorry, the last message was meant for Eric!
Eric, hope you reach a good decision for your Santorin.

Ian 'Ocean Hobo' SN96


ericmeury@...
 

Ian

We ended up going with the following


new batteries are purchased. 680 Amp hours at 12 volt. Also purchased an automated battery watering system with the batteries. Picking them up on Friday and installing on friday then beer. each batter was 250 MINUS the core (varies on type of battery) I originally wanted the L16 wich would give 840 Amp hours but figured the savings in money could buy another solar panel.







Ian Park <oceanhobo@...>
 

Eric
let me know what you do about the Sterling Alternator to Battery charger. I was looking at that as an alternative to changing to a larger alternator. It reads as if you could connect both the engine and shaft alternators to it (still working independently as originally designed) but would complete a better 4 stage charging regime and be adjustable for different battery types. Has anyone else out there installed one of these??
....and get plenty beers ready on the battery exchange - I've done it twice now and lost about 7lbs body weight in sweat each time. Next time I do it I'm going to sail somewhere cold first!!
I've currently got 2 x 75w solar panels on the aft side rails. They pivot easily at anchor and stack vertically inside the rails when sailing, but they are not enough to keep the fridge going during the day. I need around another 100 w of solar. I did buy a portable generator which I plug directly into the shore power socket. This works well for charging and giving some mains voltage in the boat provided you keep the total outgoing amps within the range of what's being produced. It means Linda is a happy girl because she can use her hair dryer etc when we're anchored - well worth it for a contented crew!!
Good luck with your installation.
Ian
'Ocean Hobo' SN96



On Wednesday, 14 June 2017, 23:34, "ericmeury@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Ian

We ended up going with the following


new batteries are purchased. 680 Amp hours at 12 volt. Also purchased an automated battery watering system with the batteries. Picking them up on Friday and installing on friday then beer. each batter was 250 MINUS the core (varies on type of battery) I originally wanted the L16 wich would give 840 Amp hours but figured the savings in money could buy another solar panel.









ste.dente
 

Ian, we installed last year the Sterling charger you're speaking about. We should now use the alternator of the motor AND the shaft alternator at the same time. In theory. In practice, we noticed that you loose control upon the charge process. We have the original DC4000 that gives us the amount of amp. going in and going out ; and gives us also informations about the % of charge of the batteries and the volt. Before this change, the DC was working very good. Now, it seems that our brand new batteries ( 5 AGM - Zenith-105 Amp each) could not been charged above the 65-69%. We are very confused and not happy. Let us know what you decide and the results you have. Good luck

Stefania # SN93 BoccadiMagra(IT)

Il giorno 15 giu 2017, alle ore 08:30, Ian Park oceanhobo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> ha scritto:

 

Eric
let me know what you do about the Sterling Alternator to Battery charger. I was looking at that as an alternative to changing to a larger alternator. It reads as if you could connect both the engine and shaft alternators to it (still working independently as originally designed) but would complete a better 4 stage charging regime and be adjustable for different battery types. Has anyone else out there installed one of these??
....and get plenty beers ready on the battery exchange - I've done it twice now and lost about 7lbs body weight in sweat each time. Next time I do it I'm going to sail somewhere cold first!!
I've currently got 2 x 75w solar panels on the aft side rails. They pivot easily at anchor and stack vertically inside the rails when sailing, but they are not enough to keep the fridge going during the day. I need around another 100 w of solar. I did buy a portable generator which I plug directly into the shore power socket. This works well for charging and giving some mains voltage in the boat provided you keep the total outgoing amps within the range of what's being produced. It means Linda is a happy girl because she can use her hair dryer etc when we're anchored - well worth it for a contented crew!!
Good luck with your installation.
Ian
'Ocean Hobo' SN96



On Wednesday, 14 June 2017, 23:34, "ericmeury@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
Ian

We ended up going with the following


new batteries are purchased. 680 Amp hours at 12 volt. Also purchased an automated battery watering system with the batteries. Picking them up on Friday and installing on friday then beer. each batter was 250 MINUS the core (varies on type of battery) I originally wanted the L16 wich would give 840 Amp hours but figured the savings in money could buy another solar panel.