Anchor chain channel liner


thomas.kleman <no_reply@...>
 

I own L'ORIENT, SM2K #422; as the anchor chain exits the boat, underneath the chain forward of the windlass is some kind of heavy duty paper liner intended to protect the gelcoat/fiberglass underneath in the channel. Mine has worn badly........replacing this would be straightforward if I only knew what it was. Kind of looks like a heavy duty non-skid paper of some kind. Thoughts ?


greatketch@...
 

Our boat (significantly earlier in production sequence) has the very front edge of the channel near the rollerprotected with stainless steel screwed into the fiberglass.  And another small piece nearer the windlass where the links would impact the channel.

We are replacing them with a single piece of stainless that covers the whole channel.

Bill Kinney
Sm160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL

---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote :

I own L'ORIENT, SM2K #422; as the anchor chain exits the boat, underneath the chain forward of the windlass is some kind of heavy duty paper liner intended to protect the gelcoat/fiberglass underneath in the channel. Mine has worn badly........replacing this would be straightforward if I only knew what it was. Kind of looks like a heavy duty non-skid paper of some kind. Thoughts ?


thomas.kleman <no_reply@...>
 

Wow- great idea; hadn't thought about stainless. Thanks.


Duane Siegfri
 

I had that peel off of our boat as well.  I replaced it with an EPDM pad that I glued down.  This is a 30" square pad made out of rubber roofing material that is laid down for walkways on "rubber" (EPDM) roofs.  It's available on the internet, search for EPDM walkway pad.  They have raised dots to improve traction, are very resistant to UV, and look OK in black.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

In Fort Lauderdale, I was told the lining material is called "shark skin," but could never find any.  In La Rochelle in 2015 I asked one of the Amel technicians who was aboard to replace it, he said the material is no longer available.

To reduce the amount of wear on the liner, we did two things in Fort Lauderdale:

2014: Two small, rectangular, "starboard" pads were glued into the vertical or nearly vertical leading edges of the fiberglass, aft of where the stainless steel ends.  Otherwise, the fiberglass had begun to show deterioration.  The pads now show significant abrasion, but are still in very good working order.

2015: Two narrow pieces of teak were screwed into the floor of the channel, about halfway between the windlass and the stainless steel.   The chain runs in between the pieces of wood when the anchor is down, and the anchor and its swivel and shackle no longer strike the shark skin when the anchor is up.  The wood shows quite a bit of abrasion, but both pieces are in good working order.

The "shark skin" shows no additional wear and tear since 2015, despite anchoring out most of the time.  Had these measures not been undertaken, I am positive the "shark skin" would have had to be replaced by now.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K Nr. 350 (2002)
Underway, Patara to Kas, Turkey